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stance and the holy grail - please read!

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by mike_odonovan, Jul 4, 2003.


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  1. after spending a month of soul searching regarding my stance :confused: (no really, i have been losing sleep over this) i have come to some conclusions.

    first here is what i have been up to.
    i did some research:

    - went to three prominent teachers in as many weeks to get their thoughts
    - read every post i could find on here regarding this issue (thanks guys)
    - bought and studied videos by Gary Karr, Dave Holland, Ray Brown, Francious Rabbath, and John Clayton.
    - went to see as many bass players playing around my local area (London)

    a lot of time and a fair bit of expense.

    my gut feeling is that stance is a bit of a compromise. anyone who tells you "this is the correct way", without it really making sense - i am immediately suspicious of. sure there are very important general principles (me and my body kind of found out the hard way) but i think the compromise idea still holds (or is it stands ;) ).

    take Gary Karrs stance. with the bass positioned upright the body is not having the carry the weight of this very big instrument. also the bass can be used to lean into the left hand fingers for the thumb position. handy. weight is distributed on both legs evenly with the bass being stopped from spinning by the left leg/knee. all good.
    except i realised that he hardly ever plays on the E string. this is a bread and butter area for my walking lines and community orchestra bowing techique/role. indeed when i tried bowing on the E string with the Karr stance my right hip seems to be always getting in the way. :eek:

    recently i have been using David Kaczorowski stance that he mentioned in a post here:
    "I have the back edge of the upper bout in my lower gut around my belly button."

    this stance seems to keep the body out of the way when bowing the E string and has all the advantges of the Karr approach. EXCEPT I can't use my left leg to stop the bass spinning and that worrys me a bit. it doesn't seem to affect my playing noticably so maybe it will become more steady as i continue. also the bass is moved slightly by the stomach when breathing. whatmore i aint gonna get any slimmer in my old beer drinking age!

    so is there something i am not doing when i bow on the E string using the Karr stance that would fix this minor flaw in an otherwise completely sensical approach?

    or have i found my stance with this diagnal approach and will become more accostomed to the balance on my stomach. and maybe get down the gym!

    really really really appreciate any thoughts.

    thanks so much guys, i couldn't have got thru this month without this site.

    cheers
     
  2. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    PADDY O'FURNITURE,

    I wish you only the best of luck on your quest for a better playing posture that works for you. But since you posted the exact same thread in "Orchestral Technique", and since double posting is frowned on around these parts, I'll close this thread and direct anyone who might like to attempt a reply to do so in the mirror thread in "Orchestral Technique". Good luck.
     



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