Stanley Clark

Discussion in 'Bassists [DB]' started by christ andronis, Oct 24, 2005.

  1. christ andronis

    christ andronis

    Nov 14, 2001
    I had the good fortune to see Stanley Clark, Bela Fleck and Jean Luc Ponty last night at Orchestra Hall. All I can really say is WOW. I've never been a huge fan of Stanley's because I've always felt his technique (of which he has an abundance) is way ahead of his musical ideas. I'm still of the same mind after seeing the concert last night, but oh man, that technique is awesome. I might also add that his ensemble playing is impecible. He has fingers that look like meat hooks which allow him to do some really fine flamenco type strumming with his right hand. I was fortunate to be in about the sixth row so I had a great view of his hand positions. I'd highly recommend this tour, but last night was the final show.
  2. glivanos

    glivanos Supporting Member

    Jun 24, 2005
    Philadelphia Area
    I too am a huge fan of Stanley Clarke's.

    I've seen him back in the 70's with Chick Corea at the Bijou Cafe (I think I'm dating myself here) in Philly when Return to Forever was just getting off the ground and most recently at Newport 2004 & the Keswick Theatre near Philly with John Luc-Ponty and Al Dimeola.

    He is just as awesome today as he was then, especially on upright.

    Keep on truckin' Stanley!!
  3. Eggman


    Dec 3, 2004
    Denver, Colorado
    I saw Stanley with Return to Forever in 1976 at a place called Ebbett's Field in Denver - small place - maybe 100 person capacity. Dead center front row. When Stanley walked in I shook his hand and his fingers seemed to wrap around my hand and wrist twice. Huge hands. To watch in play from no more than 10 feet was incredible.

    JAUQO III-X Banned

    Jan 4, 2002
    Endorsing artist:see profile.
    I was at that show last night as well and it was a very nice show,Stanley was (as well as Jean-Luc and Bela)in top notch form.
  5. Akami

    Akami Four on the floor

    I remember seeing Stanley Clarke on tv sometime in the 80's close to the same time I saw Yes on another program and one thing that stuck with me the most through the years was how both Stanley and Chris seemed to be having so much fun, as if what they were playing was nothing more difficult than walking and chewing gum.

    Someday I hope to be able to do that too - I mean, walk and chew gum! :p
  6. Rabb


    Mar 2, 2005
    SF Bay Area
    Mid 70s - middle row - smoke filled - Berkeley Community Theatre. RTF (Romantic Warrior Tour) with Stanley playing what looked like rubber bands. I'll never forget it. Went back years later to see them again. I had the ticket to the wrong show. Totally bummed me out. I guess that smoke got to me. Then just last year had tickets to see him with Jean Luc Ponty in SF. Concert got cancelled because of an illness. I guess I was only meant to see him once.
  7. brooklynbassguy

    brooklynbassguy Supporting Member

    Feb 8, 2004
    maplewood, nj, usa
    Stanley is the reason why I play the bass. He always makes playing music seem like fun. True master and showman. Check out, if you can find it, the Curtis Fuller record "Crankin" with Stanley and Lenny White fresh out of high school.
  8. AxtoOx


    Nov 12, 2005
    Duncan, Okla.
    Saw him w/ the "New Barbarians"(Kieth Richards, Ronnie Wood and Co.). He got to do a very long solo w/o the Stones guys and It just floored the crowd. We had never seen or heard anything like it. Changed my whole view of bass.
  9. Andy Allen

    Andy Allen "Working Bassist"

    Aug 31, 2003
    Los Angeles, CA
    I saw him in a tiny pub in London in the Late 80s with Stuart Copeland on drums - they were launching their band "Animal Logic."

    Great stuff, but it was on electric bass, so to steer us back on the DB topic; I recently rented the Al DiMeola/ Jean Luc Ponty/ Stanley Clarke DVD "The Rite of Strings." Nice stuff, if rather forgettable musically.

    Stanley Clarke was playing upright, of course and what impressed me most was his restraint - particularly in light of his earlier electric-bass pyrotechnics. He mostly held down the groove with ostinato figures, with occasional flourishes. Much more tasteful than I'd have imagined.