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Stereo Wiring (Not Ric) Anyone?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by Markpotato, Jul 30, 2012.


  1. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    Has anyone played around with using two output jacks? I know most people probably think that's stupid but what I want to achieve is having two single coil pickups wired to seperate output jacks with seperate volume and tone controls. That so far, I believe I've managed to figure out. But what I also want is to have the seperate volume and tone controls continue to run without affecting one another if I send one pickup to both outputs, or both pickups wired in series to both outputs. What I'm worried about here is the potential for Output Jack A to be affected when you turn Output Jack B's volume and tone controls.

    Here's the diagram I have so far, although instead of having a master volume blend pot, I'd like to have two volumes. Doesn't change the wiring though. It's going to be for Jazz Bass style 5 string pickups:

    stereoseriesparallel1vol2tone.

    So basically, because both output jacks will be connected through the pickup(s) in series mode or in parallel neck or bridge alone position, I'm thinking that this will force the controls of one output jack to affect the tone/volume of the other jack, except when in parallel mode with both pickups selected, which should isolate the two.

    Does anyone know how I could isolate each control circuit so they don't affect each other? This way you can turn down the volume of one output to single out the other, and be able to blend it in smoothly. The idea is to be able to have "treble" and "bass" amps and be able to control them both onboard the instrument.

    I've been wanting to do a bass like this for some time now.
     
  2. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    Bump
     
  3. KodyAudette

    KodyAudette

    Apr 30, 2012
    Albuquerque
    Hmm..

    I think you're correct in assuming that they will affect each other.

    Do you specifically want to control the blend between the two with two separate volume controls or would a "blend" pot work?

    Perhaps by incorporating a small active 2 channel mixer with just a blend control you could isolate the two signals? I've never tried it, but it's a thought.
     
  4. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    Not going active. I could use a blend pot, like in the diagram, but would rather be able to control each output individually.

    I'm also considering having 2 neck pickups and 2 bridge pickups and distributing the signals individually that way.
     
  5. Praxist

    Praxist

    May 28, 2010
    British Columbia
    Hi markpotato, I don't have an answer to your wiring question although i have some experience with what you're trying to achieve. I built a stereo bass a little while back and originally used rick-o-sound wiring. Then i wired them separately to their own jacks but also had a blendpot with a switch to switch to separate wiring, or blend them. I just pirated the schematics on here or might have been tdpri? Anyway, the bottom line was that although it was a cool effect, it was kind of pointless in a band situation. Neat things to play with when noodling around but it was just too subtle in the band mix to be worth the effort of maintaining two different sounds in the rigs. For me, rick-o-sound achieves it best with the simplest controls, but in the end, it was just not that practical to me. Is this for a customer or for your own?
     
  6. Markpotato

    Markpotato

    Jul 19, 2012
    Eureka Springs, AR
    Luthier, Sorrentino Guitars
    It's for myself. Mainly for recording, I don't have a band. It would be cool to have a two amp setup and have the bridge pickup go to one amp and neck pickup go to another. It really is more for recording though.

    I'm also trying to keep it to where, if I were in a band situation, I could simply use one output jack and have all the sounds I need.
     
  7. Praxist

    Praxist

    May 28, 2010
    British Columbia
    cool. Well in any case, i think Line6Man, more often in the pickups/electronics forum is the grandmaster dude to ask as he's got nearly everything in the bag and he's super nice!
     
  8. craigie

    craigie

    Nov 11, 2015
    calgary
    Billy Sheehan said he wired his bass with two completely separate circuits and uses the neck EB0 pickup for the bass cabinet and the p pickup for the treble cabinet. Not sure how much music would actually need that kind of sound. I think his approach is best: k.i.s.s.
     
  9. Bruce Johnson

    Bruce Johnson Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 4, 2011
    Fillmore, CA
    Professional Luthier
    On my high-end Scroll Basses, I use three output jacks. It's all passive. One jack is the Normal output, fed from a circuit with Volume, Tone, and Blend controls, blending the signals from the two pickups. The other two jacks are Direct Outs coming from the two pickups; a straight hotwire from each pickup with no interference from the Tone circuit.

    The key is that I use (Switchcraft) switching jacks for the two Direct Out jacks. In the circuit, they are located between the pickup and the controls. When no plug is in the jack, the signal goes through the jack to the blend circuit. Plug in a cord, and it breaks the connection to the blend circuit and sends the signal out the cord. So, the act of plugging the cord in that jack is the switch that changes the circuit.

    What I'm suggesting is that you may be able to use switching jacks to do something similar with your circuit.

    By the way, the two Direct Out jacks are quite handy in the studio. Use two cords to plug into two channels on your recording rig. Record your bass line, and now you have the sound of the two pickups completely isolated from each other, but fully synchronized. During mixdown, you can decide how to mix them note by note if you want to. This is particularly useful if the two pickups in the bass have distinctly different sounds from each other.
     
    MattZilla and Will_White like this.
  10. craigie

    craigie

    Nov 11, 2015
    calgary
    That's nuts Bruce! Genius in a mad scientist spinal tap way. I'm going to try it!
     
  11. StereoPlayer

    StereoPlayer

    Aug 29, 2010
    When I wire a bass stereo, I essentially wire it as two separate instruments and I use a stereo jack.

    Or... You can wire it just like a RIC and that way you could play mono as well.
     
    S-Bigbottom likes this.
  12. StereoPlayer

    StereoPlayer

    Aug 29, 2010
    Once you try running a rig that way it's hard to switch back.

    Neck PU gives you all the bass you'll ever need...in your amp of choice(or channel)
    Bridge PU gives you treble, growl, mids.....plus, I use effects on this PU, so no bass loss! Run bridge PU into your amp of choice(or channel), some people even use a guitar amp for the bridge PU.

    One word for your tone- Control
    image.
     
    S-Bigbottom likes this.

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