1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Stingray5 (H) vs. G&L L-1505 (usa)

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by soloman61, Oct 27, 2006.


  1. Stingray5 single H

    29 vote(s)
    82.9%
  2. G&L L-1505

    6 vote(s)
    17.1%
  1. title says it all - looking at two basses comparably priced (within $150 of each other stingray is higher). which would you buy.

    Stingray5 single H or a U.S.A. G&L L-1505. all else being equal (age, wear, etc).

    thanks
     
  2. dougjwray

    dougjwray

    Jul 20, 2005
    Well, can you play both and decide?
    Otherwise, the short answer would be that the G&L is more versatile, but the Stingray has an strong, inimitable sound. I have both a Stringray 5 and a G&L (4-string, though) and love them. I'm sure both would be extremely well-made, reliable, nice to look at, etc.
     
  3. dougjwray,

    Both are long distance deals - both used - I have played new of each, so I know what I am getting. Asking lots of questions and inspecting photos at this point.

    Thanks.
     
  4. danomite64

    danomite64

    Nov 16, 2004
    Tampa, Florida
    While an L-2500 might be more versitile than a SR5, I seriously doubt an L-1505 is (personally, I wasn't all that impressed with most of the tonal options my L-2000 had, anyway). Plus, I prefer the SR 5 neck, and it's resale is better. So, if it were me, I'd go for the SR5, hands down.
     
  5. markjazzbassist

    markjazzbassist Supporting Member

    Apr 19, 2005
    Lakewood, OH
    Stringray. I got one on the way.
     

  6. You're sending me one??? :hyper: :bassist:

    Thank you very much - you are too kind. HaHaHaHa

    WishWishWish.
     
  7. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    I have a fretless L-1505 on the way, and I own a SR5 HH. I used to own an L-1500 around 1986. If I remember correctly, the L-1500 sounded closer to a P-bass than the Stingray. I thought it had a really throaty slap sound and I really enjoyed it, I think I traded it for a fretless Peavey Foundation.
     
  8. PeppermanL2K

    PeppermanL2K ...and on the 8th day, God created the Habanero.

    Feb 3, 2006
    Huntsville, AL
    Well, it's apples and oranges. Although the pickup looks very similar and is in the same position, they have very different sounds. I described to to another TB'er like this: Think of the SR5 as a mallet, the L2500 as a hammer and the L1505 as a nailgun. Very, very punchy. They (1505's) work best in more aggressive music, IMO.
     
  9. WarriorJoe7

    WarriorJoe7 Inactive

    Mar 12, 2004
    Syracuse, NY
    If it was a 4 string I would take the G&L because i like the electronics better, but since it's a 5 string the musicman because it's likely to have a better B string.
     
  10. Or should I just save for a modulus sweet spot??? or flea 5er
     
  11. lug

    lug Supporting Member

    Feb 11, 2005
    League City, Tx
    Unlikely because the G&L neck is larger, bi-cut, and I've been told (but can't find documentation) that they use quartersawn necks on their 5 stringers. My L2000 neck is the most rigid 4 string jazz sized neck I've ever played on.
     
  12. WarriorJoe7

    WarriorJoe7 Inactive

    Mar 12, 2004
    Syracuse, NY
    Actually I think it's the pickup that makes the difference. Also don't get a modulus unless you try one first preferably with your band. I like them but they on have one sound... quite bright, but also still deep. It's a different sound than mosty basses.
     
  13. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Everything you said about G&L necks is 100% accurate. I think G&L neck construction is booutique level. The workmanship going into G&L basses is easily on with Ernie Ball MusicMan. As I said, I plan to own both in the near future.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.