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StrapLok?....DRILLING!?.....NOOO!!!

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by SpeeDFX, May 3, 2002.


  1. SpeeDFX

    SpeeDFX

    Apr 14, 2002
    I just bought some brand new straploks, to attatch to my brand to strap to attach to my brand new Fender Standard Jazz V that I got yesturday. I am reading the instructions...and it says that I have to drill 1/8" hole in my bass after I remove the factory strap buttons. I'm experienced with a drill, but no risking damaging my first, and expensive (to me) bass guitar. What should I do? everyone is telling me straploks are a must!
     
  2. jasonbraatz

    jasonbraatz

    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    you don't have to. just remove your old ones and attach the new straplox in the same fashion.


    no biggie ;)
     
  3. SpeeDFX

    SpeeDFX

    Apr 14, 2002
    :- X. No. not possible...sounds too simple :- P. Just take out the old strap buttons, and put the screws for the new ones and just screw it in?
     
  4. aye.

    alltho i personally always squirt in a little bit of glue, to lock the screw in very tight. even if the screw is a little bigger.
     
  5. On my Stingray5 I just used the screws from the standart strap button to screw the straplok button on. Works just as good.:)
     
  6. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    Relax, Man.... When you get right down to it, the thing is a chunk of wood and it's hard to screw it up. Anything can be fixed for the most part. The worst that could happen would be that you might drill the hole too big or too deep, in which case you can fill the hole with a little glue and a toothpick or match, then install the strap lock.

    If you DON'T install the strap locks, though, you risk damage to the bass far beyond a mis-drilled hole.

    Basses are tools, not museum pieces...it's gonna get scratched and worn after a while. Fenders are the tough as nails. Relax.
     
  7. Devnor

    Devnor

    Nov 13, 2001
    Dallas TX
    Best bet is to drill per the instructions. If the original hole is too small or not deep enough, you wont be able to completely seat the new screw(the straplok wont engage). If you use the old screw, it might be too small and your straplok will come apart from the instrument.

    Here is what I do. Get a 1/8th inch drill bit and a small piece of masking tape. Place the masking tape around the drill bit 1 inch from the tip. Drill into the instrument until you hit the tape. Install straplok.

    I've done this to about 20 instruments with no problems. You'll be using the proper hardware and the likelyhood of the straplok failing is minimal.
     
  8. 1964

    1964

    Mar 26, 2002
    Too Close To Hell
    If the new screws are too big, providing the head of the old screws are big enough, yet not too big, just use the old screws. I've use the old screws every time w/o problems!
     
  9. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    I very much recommend following the instructions. Typically, the screws with the locks are quite a bit longer, increasing the amount of protection you have. Plus, the old screw isn't designed for the lock button.

    If you attempt to force the new screws into the old hole without the correct pilot hole, you run the risk of splitting the horn open. Now THAT would suck.

    IMHO, you are taking a much bigger risk of damaging the instrument by not following the instructions.

    If you are freaking about it, take it to the shop. I wouldn't expect them you charge more than $10 or so.


    Chas
     
  10. Gman

    Gman

    Jan 4, 2000
    Indianapolis, IN
    I use Schaller locks, and I've put them on every bass I've ever had, without having to drill. The new screw fits the old screw hole perfectly.

    The downside to Schallers, is that it is a heavey piece of steel swinging from a leather strap, and can easily ding the bass if you'r not carefull. So you need to be watchful while atattching the strap.

    Dave
     
  11. 1964

    1964

    Mar 26, 2002
    Too Close To Hell
    > "I very much recommend following the instructions. Typically, the screws with the locks are quite a bit longer, increasing the amount of protection you have. Plus, the old screw isn't designed for the lock button.

    If you attempt to force the new screws into the old hole without the correct pilot hole, you run the risk of splitting the horn open. Now THAT would suck.

    IMHO, you are taking a much bigger risk of damaging the instrument by not following the instructions."



    I've installed more than half-a-dozen - on various guitars and basses - of the Dunlop StrapLoks - which is what I believe we're talking about here - and on not one occasion have I come across ANY of the hurdles presented here! The screws that come with the system are nothing at all special AND even they vary!
     
  12. Munjibunga

    Munjibunga Total Hyper-Elite Member Gold Supporting Member

    May 6, 2000
    San Diego (when not at Groom Lake)
    Independent Contractor to Bass San Diego
    Bring it over. I'll do it.
     
  13. DP Custom

    DP Custom DP Custom Basses

    Feb 7, 2001
    NC, USA
    You guys are forgetting that there's a diference between the Dunlop "flushmount" type and the Schallers..

    yes, the Schallers can be screwed right into the existing holes, since the button still sits on top of the wood like a regular buttton does.

    however
    The Dunlop flushmount straplocks do require a larger hole also be drilled for the metal catch to sink into...

    the originator of this thread didn't specify which ones, did he?

    Dave P.
     
  14. i doubt he has flushmounts, i've never even seen those in stores as after-market upgrades.

    i have dunlop non-flush locks on two basses. i drilled my washburn first and that worked fine, and on my reverend i tried just screwing it into the existing hole and that worked fine too. i recommend the second method, but first take the old button out and use something to measure the depth of the hole before you try it.
     
  15. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    This is a good point...but he DID specifiy an 1/8" hole, which disqualifies the flush mount, I think.
     
  16. malthumb

    malthumb

    Mar 25, 2001
    The Motor City
    I totally agre with what Devnor and Chasarms are saying. It MIGHT be possible to use the existing screw, but following the directions improves your chances of getting it right. If you personally are nervous about handling a drill around your bass, take it to somebody who's done it. Munji has already volunteered :D . If you can't find Munji the next best thing might be to take it to a store and pay the repair guy $10 or so to do it for you. This is cheap insurance.

    James