String crosstalk while tapping

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Joe P, Mar 17, 2006.


  1. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    I've been working on tapping, and also considering what kind of pro-bass I'm going to buy (now I run a 33" Peavey MIA passive Foundation-5 with a solid maple, bolt-on neck). I'm a 'technician-type', and have been very interested in the subject of 'string crosstalk' - in other words 'if I fretboard-tap a string (with no muting, other than when I stop the tapped string - right now I always use twin 'scrunchy'-mutes behind where I'm playing), how much energy is trasferred into the other strings' (or, as it turns-out, other non-intended vibrations).

    I've come to some specific conclusions regarding bass construction on this subject. I'd like to put forth my findings, and see if I could get some further input from some of you.

    Here's what I found (in-general..):
    - All-maple necks trasfer vibrations to the other strings more than necks with a seperate rosewood fretboard (this seems to be a constant on many basses that I've done this experiment on).
    - Neck-through basses exhibited an unexpected property that causes the odd-length of string BEHIND the fret I'm tapping to be picked-up by the pups (way-more than with a bolt-on, on every bass I've tried).
    - therefore, the best tapping bass is one with a bolt-on neck, and a rosewood fretboard.

    Make any sense?

    Thanks for your input -

    Joe
     
  2. WillCO

    WillCO An ounce of perception, a pound of obscure.

    Mar 9, 2005
    Denver, nee Austin
    Makes sense to me. I would think that, all else constant, a bolt-on with a rosewood board would provide less vibration transfer than most other common combinations, and that fact would lead to your conclusions.
     
  3. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    Cool. Thanks for your help, Will.

    I'm glad to at-least see right away that I'm not completely-spun on the subject!

    Notice, though, that I made a potentially pretty big jump there to say 'therefore the so-and-so is best'. Can you think of any considerations that I didn't take into account?

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    I get a pretty good tap sound out of my current cheepie (WITH the hair-tie mutes!), and I love my bass - but now I'm getting better and more respected and-all, and I'm with a big 9-piece band now. I'd best get a pro bass soon; then I'll have my old-faithful for backup too.

    Here's a clip of me tapping with Funk University (we were only seven-piece back-then):
    http://www.narwold.org/joep/What Does it Take (small).mp3

    Thanks -

    Joe
     
  4. WillCO

    WillCO An ounce of perception, a pound of obscure.

    Mar 9, 2005
    Denver, nee Austin
    Well, based on that clip, I'd say you are going to sound pretty good no matter what you play.

    I suppose "best" is almost always a subjectivity. In this case, you can get close to "best" by replacing it to "most conducive to the particular result I'm after", which is pretty impossible to argue.