string tension and old hand

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by kkaarrll, Sep 21, 2016.


  1. Linnin

    Linnin

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    Numbers on a page are just that. Numbers on a page. What you feel is what is real.
     
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  2. ixlramp

    ixlramp Guest

    Jan 25, 2005
    Scientific tension provides a good starting point to get you close, then perfect through trial and error.
    Scientific tension still has the largest effect on 'perceived tension', and there's nothing wrong with a rational so-called 'western mindset'.
    Scientific tension is very real, it's the way of the universe.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2016
    kkaarrll likes this.
  3. kkaarrll

    kkaarrll

    Jun 1, 2014
    with the money some of these strings are (cough cough TI) yes, I want to make an informed decision.

    Thinking of the low tension legends--they sound good to me, and round core?? hmmm
     
  4. Linnin

    Linnin

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    No it doesn't. The pounds of pull required to bring a string to pitch has nothing to do with the amount of perceived finger pressure to intonate a note on that string and also where on the fretboard. Setup comes into play with neck relief along with string height. Only a fool places their faith in science.
     
  5. kkaarrll

    kkaarrll

    Jun 1, 2014
    I think there is room for a healthy balance between some science and some of the art. I use the science to maybe not be as wrong as much on expensive string purchases.........
     
  6. I'm with you on this...

    It's true that the scientific numbers are only part of the equation; however, they can be a useful tool in providing guidance toward finding the right strings to suit one's needs.
     
  7. Thuddy Waters

    Thuddy Waters

    Mar 20, 2015
    Phoenix, AZ
    I'm pretty sure that tension does have something to do with the amount of perceived finger pressure to intonate a note on that string. It's one factor. Isn't that one of the reasons that a lighter gauge of the same string requires less perceived finger pressure to intonate a note than a heavier gauge of the same string type?
     
    Linnin likes this.
  8. Linnin

    Linnin

    Jul 19, 2012
    Linningrad, Earth
    Yes it does, but isn't end all be all of string feel with the stress on feel. Subjectivity is far more important than measurements of tension. What You Feel Is What Is Real.
     
    Thuddy Waters likes this.
  9. craigie

    craigie

    Nov 11, 2015
    calgary
    For a given length of string (if you don't change the scale of the instrument), the frequency is proportional to the mass (guage). The more mass the higher the tension. So take the G string and tune it to a low E. You get very low tension and it flops all over the place. The force required to hold the string against the neck is proportional to the tension, but does it feel better? Changing the tension also changes the amplitude of the string vibration for a given input of energy. The higher the tension the more energy it takes to displace the string a given distance. We all know these things intuitively and it's all been said in this thread.

    We're dealing with interdependent variables here: you can't change the tension without changing the way the string will vibrate and react. Try just tuning down or up, and it changes the neck relief and also the way that particular string will vibrate. So for different tension strings (or even very similar tension but different manufacturers) you will require a different setup which totally changes the feel of the instrument, not to mention the sound.

    Of course there are also other properties like elasticity, toughness, smoothness and the way materials are combined and manufactured, and maybe you believe that snake oil crap about cryogenically frozen strings hand made in antarctica by Santa's elves in the off season.

    I tried light guage strins and hated them. I also tried tru bass 88 nylon coated strings and hated them because of the feel and couldn't find a good setup that worked. But they feel great on a fretless to me.
     
  10. kkaarrll

    kkaarrll

    Jun 1, 2014
    I have read the whole cobalt flats thread, but still can't picture how smooth those feel?
     
  11. ThePresident777

    ThePresident777

    Oct 6, 2013
    As smooth as Chromes in my opinion.
     
  12. bassbully

    bassbully Endorsed by The PHALEX CORN BASS..mmm...corn!

    Sep 7, 2006
    Blimp City USA
    They are not smooth as Chromes out of the pack IMO. The Cobalts wraps have a small gap between them where chromes look like there no or little gap between the wraps. Its not horrible, just not as smooth as chromes. I have Cobalts on two basses and it took a couple weeks to lose the feeling.
     
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  13. ixlramp

    ixlramp Guest

    Jan 25, 2005
    > The pounds of pull required to bring a string to pitch has nothing to do with the amount of perceived finger pressure to intonate a note on that string

    Tension is by far the largest factor (but indeed not the only factor) in the force needed to displace the string downwards or sideways. Try pulling a string sideways while tightening and loosening the string.

    > Only a fool places their faith in science.

    You must be a monkey living in the trees then.
    Science is simply observation of the way of nature, so you distrust nature and cause and effect. Sounds like mental illness, delusion and paranoia.
     
    kkaarrll likes this.
  14. Primary

    Primary TB Assistant

    Here are some related products that TB members are talking about. Clicking on a product will take you to TB’s partner, Primary, where you can find links to TB discussions about these products.

     
    Sep 24, 2021

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