strings to reduce fret noise

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by yor123, Aug 4, 2001.


  1. yor123

    yor123

    Mar 29, 2001
    New Orleans
    I read through about 50 threads and am more confused than ever. Seems that everybody likes just about every string ever made. Go figure. I realize that string preference is highly subjective. However, I'll ask this anyway. I play a MIA Jazz. Still have the factory strings (.45-.110 niti round wounds, Superbass strings I beleive) I can not stand the harsh sound. I find myself turning down the tone pot more and more. I use a Sansamp DI, EQ the bass up and cut all the presence. I guess I am aiming for a warm sound but not muted. Unfortunalely, cranking down that tone pot is like throwing a blanket over the amp, (15 inch scorpion driver in a TKO 80 cabinet) Reading thru the posts, I've decided that flatwounds may help. I am leaning to the TI jazz flats. Or, I am wondering if the Elixir strings wouldn't eliminate the metal on metal sound that my current strings give. Maybe the gore-tex coating would dampen the fret/finger noise. It's not the right hand that creates the noise, I play very lightly, almost petting the strings. It is the left hand .

    Any comments?
     
  2. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    yor - my advice is to take it to a tech at music store if you aren't comfortable with adjusting your action.

    They can tell you if all it needs are some adjustments like the truss rod/bridge, if the neck isn't straight, or, if the frets need some work.

    If all those check out okay, it's time to adjust the bass player's technique.

    Having a bass on which you can't use any type of strings is simply unacceptable, IMO. You shouldn't have to limit your choices.
     
  3. steinbergerxp2

    steinbergerxp2 Guest

    Jul 11, 2001
    I might suggest ground-roundwound strings; less highs but still plenty of attack. GHS Brite Flats are a nice choice; about $28 delivered by www.juststrings.com . These are not the most common, but I have used G-RW for years.

    I used to use DR HighBeams on my P-Bass; I found them to be a lot "smoother" than the original Fender strings. They now make more models in DR than they used to; they are very subtle strings and responsive to how you play.

    The TI Jazz Flats have very low tension; you might not like them, particularly if you ever tune down. They are a fine string, but they are a very extreme case. I would suggest trying something "in the middle" like a G-RW or "pressure wound" instead of full flats right off.
     
  4. yor123

    yor123

    Mar 29, 2001
    New Orleans
    Thanks for the advice. I ordered Fender 9050m stainless steel flats. Seems like they are somewhat popular in this forum and they were not too expensive. I will try the GHS Brite flats next if these don't solve my problem. I ruled out the TI Jazz flats because of the low tension. I just hate the fret buzzin' and string bangin' you get with low tension strings . Hopefully the Fender 9050m flats will have higher tension than the TI Jazz flats.

    Gregg
     
  5. steinbergerxp2

    steinbergerxp2 Guest

    Jul 11, 2001
    The Fender's are a pretty "classic" flatwound. You may find that they take a fair amount of pressure and you might want to adjust your truss rod/lower your action to get them closer to the frets.

    They willl sound great as you practice by yourself. The real trick is whether you can hear them in a band practice; without the mids and highs they tend to get lost and you have a hard time hearing yourself. However, if you have enough amp and a heavy enough PA they sound great; it just takes lots of horsepower to make them "seem" loud because all you are amplifying is really "bass".