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Student needs some help!!!

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by cjkorman, Oct 14, 2004.


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  1. cjkorman

    cjkorman

    Oct 14, 2004
    Alright so I am applying to a new university as a jazz major on the electric bass and now I am not niave to the what they are looking for but one thing on the audition qualifications said all major scales 2 octaves. Ive been playing for almost 7 years and have concetrated on the theory of the bass guitar as well as string bass for almost that whole time but at no point in my education on the electric bass was I instructed on playing major/minor scales properly in 2 octaves. On the string bass that is all I ever learned.


    So im anyone has any idea of the proper way to play them or has any idea if it is all relative to what I want to play let me know tab files would be much appreciated.

    And hey just cause its fun and cliche to do so im putting a poll of your favorite buget basses.
     
  2. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    2 Octave Scales are considered an absolute bare minimum requirement for a jazz Univ.program.
    If as you say you have been studying for 7 years,and by now you can't do them in your sleep while talking on the phone,watching TV and eating a Big Mac at the same time,somebody has fed you the wrong education.
    Sorry for the harshness of that,but mastering basic rudiments like this is like breathing,you just gotta know it like the back of your hand.
    If you can't pull off those scales on the spot at a really good clip without struggling at that audition you will be shown the door quickly.
    Its a university program,there will be no time to learn Major and Minor scales,its assumed you know that when you start.
     
  3. cjkorman

    cjkorman

    Oct 14, 2004
    not to sound very "matter of facty" But I know any scale you'd tell me you just havent focused in on what I am really asking ConU. Im asking if there is any way that is the "ideal" way to play them. I am not blundering idiot as you have made me seem ive been studying the thing in college for almost 2 yearsand out side oh that for 5. I just was wondering if I could get any insite on if there is a set way to do these things or if I should take my own approach play them like on string bass or to go up the scale (for g major)
    E-string: g a b c
    A-string: d e f# g and so on from the normal ionian pattern from there.

    All Im looking for is a suggestion not a theory lesson.
     
  4. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    Play them on one string.
    Play them from lowest note to highest note in one position.
    Play them starting and ending on each note of the scale.
    Play them as double stops.
    Play them as broken thirds.
    The prof's auditioning you won't be looking for a set way of playing a 2 octave scale.They are looking for fluidity with the material.
    If you go up a 2 octave major scale on one string and come back down in broken thirds at a good clip,chances are they won't ask you to play another scale,you've demonstrated you know the material. :)
     
  5. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    Hey - the first thing that crossed my mind was the same: "Jazz school tryout, and he's asking about major scales?! Boy is HE in for a rude-awakening!"

    ConU: You just remind me again that I'd better just get on the ball here, and quit ignoring the basics! I'm just playing for the love of it (..and one thing I'd love is to be called 'one of the best around'!), but I'm just 'going through the motions' if I dont buckle-down and learn to AUTOMATICALLY play major and minor scales and triads anywhere and everywhere on the neck in any key without having to think about it - it's the absolute minimum to even call myself a 'bassist'. Until then I'm only going to say "I play the Bass".

    Joe
     
  6. Joe P

    Joe P

    Jul 15, 2004
    Milwaukee, WI
    I've never heared of a 'broken third'. Would you mind telling me?

    Thanks,

    Joe
     
  7. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    Play the scale ascending and descending as thirds.

    i.e.:C,E,D,F,E,G,F,A,G,B,A,C,B,D,C
    D,B,C,A,B,G,A,F,G,E,F,D,E,C,D,B,C

    doing it over 2 octaves just requires ascending for 2 octaves repeating the pattern,then coming back down.

    Excellent warm-up,in every key,over the entire neck.Starting on lowest note available from the scale to highest.
    On a 24 fret bass,4 strings,Thats open E to the 24th fret on the G string your high G for the above Cmaj scale.