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Studio Design Ideas

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by noeinstein, Aug 18, 2018.


  1. noeinstein

    noeinstein Supporting Member

    Sep 3, 2004
    Northern California
    I have an outbuilding with about 290 sq ft. I'd like to turn it into a rehearsal studio with a little space for tools and a workbench.

    I'd appreciate hearing from anyone who has done this or has even a partial design for how to do it. Thinking some reasonable way to soundproof the walls, plenty of electrical, light/skylight, 1/4 bath, what else will I want?

    Get as creative as you like. Gracias!
     
  2. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    What are the interior dimensions of the building? I assume it is one big room. Walls open to the studs or finished (how so, if it is)?
     
  3. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    I also suggest moving this to Off Topic as, except that you want to use it as a rehearsal space, nothing else in the discussion of this has anything, really, to do with music which is what Miscellaneous is intended for.
     
  4. noeinstein

    noeinstein Supporting Member

    Sep 3, 2004
    Northern California
    Happy to, how?
     
  5. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    PM a mod, they'll move it for you.
     
  6. Frank Tuesday

    Frank Tuesday

    Jul 11, 2008
    Austin, TX
    ahc likes this.
  7. noeinstein

    noeinstein Supporting Member

    Sep 3, 2004
    Northern California
    Will do, thanks.
     
  8. noeinstein

    noeinstein Supporting Member

    Sep 3, 2004
    Northern California
  9. Badwater

    Badwater

    Jan 12, 2017
    There's some good resources on the YouTube on how others did it. Sound proofing is expensive and involved process. But if you have the budget, well worth it.
     
  10. hrodbert696

    hrodbert696 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Seems to me rehearsal space is music-related. The OP is asking about issues like soundproofing, not just how to run power to a shed. This is in the correct forum.
     
    Passinwind, noeinstein and Microbass like this.
  11. This an awesome thread with some amazing information for any DIY'ers. I think I'm a @silky smoove fan girl.

    As for options... Water cooler? You know to hang out at between songs and discuss firing the drummer.
    Pull down bed for when the significant other kicks you out?
    Ampeg 8x10 converted to a beer fridge, obviously.

    On a more serous level...
    Secure storage for instruments/mics
    Space for recording; think ahead, it's a rehearsal space now but your band may want to do a demo down the road - will you layout allow to be in an ideal position at the work bench?
    Think about seating... couches encourage laziness but then stools can be uncomfy as can be standing for hours.
     
    MattZilla and noeinstein like this.
  12. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    What power do you have out there, now?

    Plumbing - Is there a sewer line and hot & cold water connections in the building?

    City sewer system or septic tank?

    Windows? What kinds and how many?

    HVAC in the building as of yet?

    What type of roof? Gable? Flat. Hip? Etc.

    Again, what is the inside dimensions of the space? One big room/ Divided up, already?

    Wall treatment? Plaster & lath? Drywall? Down to the studs? Other?

    Any communications lines? Telephone? T1? Cable? LAN lines? Etc.

    Insulation?

    Given you are in California - fire sprinklers requirements? Fire resistant outside cladding materials (walls-roof)?

    I take it you'll also want a small kitchen area, if for nothing other than a refrigerator, and sink to barf in after consuming too much alcohol? ;)

    I suggest you keep your workshop and tools totally separate (and, lockable) room. Make sure it is large enough to do whatever work you plan to do in there.

    Most important - make sure you contact your city's building department and secure ALL relevant building permits if you do not want to incur fines and having to tear out all that work you will be putting into the project. Better safe and legal than stupid. If you are doing the work it is your responsibility to acquire them. If a contractor is doing the work he must acquire the permits and you must make sure these permits are visible from outside the building.

    This is all strictly music making related, of course. ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2018
  13. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    The only truly effective soundproofing method to minimize/eliminate sounds from being heard by your neighbors is the floating room within a room technique (Google it). Everything else, really, just makes a difference for those INSIDE THE ROOM. Otherwise, the best method to keep the volume down.
     
  14. noeinstein

    noeinstein Supporting Member

    Sep 3, 2004
    Northern California
    A soundproof recording studio is not within my means. My plan is for a functional and comfortable rehearsal space/music room with some reasonably good acoustic treatment.

    The interior dimensions are about 17' x 17' with gabled (6yo) roof. It currently has a wall down the middle; one half is a semi-finished room with textured drywall walls/ceiling, flooring, french doors and one window, the other half is a (very) small garage/storage area with open studs/rafters (house built in 1942). I would likely keep the window, but everything else can go.

    The bldg has 120v (with 220v nearby) and natural gas, but is not plumbed for water or sewer. Heating and AC will be a necessity. I'd like to include a toilet/sink and room for (@Microbass) maybe an Ampeg 410 beer fridge ;)

    It'd be nice to have a bit of space devoted to computer, DAW, etc. for recording, but that is secondary for now. More importantly, I want a small space for a bench/tools to do my setups/repairs. It would be cool to use the same space for both, i.e., make it convertible somehow.

    I appreciate all your ideas, thank you!
     
    Microbass likes this.
  15. Sounds good! Although not convinced a 4x10 conversion is ideal. We like our speakers at eyes and beers no lower than hip, man!!
     
  16. noeinstein

    noeinstein Supporting Member

    Sep 3, 2004
    Northern California
    Haha, I was thinking of conserving space, but you are correct... life is all about priorities!
     
    Microbass likes this.
  17. Except for height an 8x10 doesn’t take up anymore space.

    But offers more space for beer!
     
  18. noeinstein

    noeinstein Supporting Member

    Sep 3, 2004
    Northern California
    Point taken :thumbsup:
     
    Microbass likes this.
  19. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    You need to work from big to small. The biggest decision in any music space construction is whether or not you’re concerned with isolation or not. Remember that isolation works identically in both directions (ie keeping a noisy drummer away from your neighbors, as well as keeping your neighbor’s lawn mower out of your microphones).

    So with that said; How much isolation do you need?
     
  20. silky smoove

    silky smoove Supporting Member

    May 19, 2004
    Seattle, WA
    Thanks for the shout-out. I’ve got a fun update planned for tomorrow :D
     
    noeinstein and Microbass like this.

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