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Stupid string experiment (that worked)

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Flatwound, Mar 12, 2001.


  1. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    OK, this is kind of weird, but I thought I'd share it with you. I had these Fender 7250's that I tried for a little while on a headless bass that I used to have. So, of course, they were too short to use on my current basses, since you clamp them at one end and cut them off (on the headless). I wondered if I could tie something to them or something so they would reach the tuners. Well, to make a long story short, I had some old D'Addario Chromes I was throwing away, so I soldered the cut ends of the Fender strings into the ball end of the Chromes, cut them to length,and stripped off the outer wrap of the Chromes. Strung 'em up and they work fine. Now I can use them for a while. I probably put a lot more labor into this than it was worth, but it was kind of fun.
     
  2. dude, are you bored?
     
  3. try doing that with a broken arm. :D
    sorry, you beat me to it, does seem like a lot of effort.
     
  4. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    Musta been. I even have a new set of Ernies laying around. I just wanted to see how the 7250's sounded on this bass before I try the EB's. You know, kind of a generic nickel wound sound. Also, I'm supposed to get an EMG pup soon, so I may save the Ernies 'til that happens.

    Also, this is not my gigging bass, so I feel it's OK to do weird stuff with it.
     
  5. So ya could get all the broken strings in the world, solder them all together, and ship 'em off to poor people in 3rd world countries that cant afford new strings!!!!
     
  6. But then you'd have to buy them basses. Hm, if I were a liberal, I'd like that idea. And amps, yeah. And nuclear power plants to run 'em with. And send 'em lawyers so they can start their own version of the RIAA, yeah.

    You know, US car companies make these really primitive vehicles for third-world countries, very easily repaired and they run on any kind of petro-swill. And there's some US gun company that makes a general purpose musket for third-world countries; they can't afford shotgun shells, but with these, you just pour some gravel or broken glass or nails in the muzzle for projectiles.

    Now taking into account the need to run and maintain devices on whatever's at hand, how would you build an electric bass and amp rig for the third world? Or, keeping it on topic, what kind of strings do they need? Should they go with gut with a little bit of wire wrapped around the section over the pickup, like the prototype Fender?
     
  7. DaveB

    DaveB

    Mar 29, 2000
    Toronto Ontario
    What's the tone like????
     
  8. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    Hmmm... I guess I'm gonna have to start work on that kerosene-powered amp I was thinking of. :D

    kurosawa- I'm not sure I believe that gun thing. I think all third-world countries can afford weapons. They buy them instead of food. After all, it's better to keep your people in line than feed them, right? Haven't you seen those emaciated people on TV running around with AK's and stuff?

    Back to the string experiment- Geez, guys, don't take it too seriously, I was just having fun. And it did work, after all. Sure, it was a waste of time, and looks stupid, but now I know how these strings sound on this bass, without buying another set. Gives me something to mess around with while I'm waiting for the EMG's.
     
  9. Yeah, they're black powder for reeeeeal primitive conditions. You waitin' on EMGs for your P? They're killer, bottom like you wouldn't believe. I have an Acme now, and I'm having a P5 built, and I'm staying away from the EMGs 'cause the Low B-4 with EMGs pumps out an obnoxious amount of lard. And EMGs with flats sound like you've never heard flats before, all kinds of delicate little textures lurking in nickel flats. Pyramids sound totally classic with a little something extra and Thomastiks sound super authoritative but smooth (I have no idea what they sound like with stainless flats, don't like the dryness of stainless, prefer the wetness of nickel). Jamerson played with the tone knob wide open, I think he would've liked EMGs.
     
  10. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    There was just a big thread about flats not sounding so good with actives. I have Fender stainless flats on my P with a Seymour Duncan pup and they sound great. Maybe I'll try some Pyramids on my Washburn bass after I get the EMG's. I've never tried them (Pyramids, that is). So far, this one sounds better with rounds. EMG's won't fit my Precision without routing, so I haven't tried that. I think I can fit two 9v. batts. in the Washburn, though.

    kurosawa- I remember seeing a show on PBS or somewhere about some former French colony in Africa. When the French left, they left a lot of trucks and machinery behind, but no parts. The people were sand-casting brake drums, and making bolts by hand. So I guess some truly primitive conditions exist.
     
  11. The EMG P pickup itself should drop in, I've done two like that. Sounds WAY different on maple and rosewood. Maple with Thomastiks is amazingly bright and lively for flats. How is it not fitting? If you mean batteries, to enlarge the battery compartment for 18v (2 battery) operation only takes a nice new sharp 1" wide wood chisel, masking tape, and care. One battery fits just fine. Is that a garden variety P or some special model?
     
  12. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    Right, kurosawa, I was talking about the battery. I don't really want to route the P.
     
  13. Well, EMGs work OK with one battery, but if you're set on not using an EMG on any less than 18v, I saw a little device advertised somewhere that would do the trick if it works as advertised (anyone know where it is on the Web? I lost the URL). It looks like a regular 9v battery clip, but somehow it puts out 18v. I don't know what kind of trickery it is, probably eats batteries at least twice as fast, but since the life of a battery feeding one EMG pickup is essentially the shelf life of the battery, one change every six to twelve months doesn't sound that bad. Can anyone help find this thing? I'd like one myself.
     
  14. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    kurosawa- I guess I was unclear. I was saying that I couldn't fit one 9v. battery in my Precision. I'm putting the EMG's in my Washburn, which has room for two batteries. I'm happy with the tone of the P already.
     
  15. Wow! I got one into my 62 RI and one into the 57, and a little chiseling got a second into the 57. All this time I thought your basic P hadn't changed all that much over the years. Guess I was wrong.
     
  16. brewer9

    brewer9

    Jul 5, 2000
    I can only imagine what your new girlfriend looks like (another experiment that didnt work so well).