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Supportive Fingering/OFOF Question

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Elsebet, Aug 17, 2007.


  1. Elsebet

    Elsebet

    Jan 21, 2006
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    My instructor is teaching me to use OFOF and supportive fingering techniques with my fretting hand. The problem I'm seeing develop is that while playing notes on the top of the fretboard (lowest pitches), my index finger ends up curving slightly so that the thumb side of it is actually touching the string. This occurs most when I am trying to stretch to keep OFOF on notes like A-flat on E, D-flat on A, F-sharp on D, and B on G.

    This seems to be causing me to get calluses on that area of my index finger instead of the tip. I can play OFOF just fine on the higher pitches without my index finger "turning", but the lower pitch notes cause this index finger issue. Do you think this will cause a problem for me in the future?
     
  2. could you explain what OFOF and supportive fingerings are? never heard of them.
     
  3. uethanian

    uethanian

    Mar 11, 2007
    i think wat u mean by supportive fingering is keeping the all the fingers fingers pressed down behind the one thats doing the actual fretting. this is what you do a lot on upright, cause the strings are so hard to push down.

    i used to play like this when doing OFOF (coming from an upright background), but then i analyzed why i was actually doing it. im not sure what angle your teacher is coming from, but it only takes one finger to push down the string. if you consentrate on lifting off excess fingers, your fretting hand will be much more relaxed.
     
  4. My index finger curls when playing on the low end of the neck, and I've seen this happen to a lot of other bass players too. I think it's quite normal for people with around average size hands, since that stretch is just a tad too big to play it without angling the index finger like that... Maybe? ^^
     
  5. JebSmells

    JebSmells

    Jul 23, 2007
    UK
    This has nothing to do with the size of your hands (unless you have Seriously disproportionatley sized hands, like really seriously) i promise.

    I all comes down to the one word people hate to hear when they ask a question like this, *ahem* : Practise!

    I have taught 9 year olds to do this properly (after much whining about pain, and how they can do it all just as well with "their" technique).

    you will get it, you just have to keep trying.

    My hands are by no means large, and i would consider my fingers to be of below average length, but i can stretch well over OFPF with good technique, just practice, practice, practice!

    good luck, D
     
  6. DocBop

    DocBop

    Feb 22, 2007
    Los Angeles, CA
    Nothing unusual there as long as you get a good solid note your in the ballpark. My callous on my index finger is slightly off to the side like you describe. My little finger is kind of short so my callous is off to the side. Where you play will change depending on the instrument you play. On my 4-strings I tend to play closer to the tips and curled fingers. As I move to 5-string a bit lower on the finger. Then on my 6-string my fingers are only slightly bent and I play further down the finger. On my upright trying to stay on finger tips but tend to play a little lower and little finger in the side do distance between notes.

    There are guidelines to you strive try for, but ask any pro the bottom line is what works for you. If you are getting good solid note and can play the tempo and techniques then don't worry. If you really think its a problem take a lesson or two and see if it helps.
     
  7. Elsebet

    Elsebet

    Jan 21, 2006
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Thanks for all the advice folks! I am going to keep this in mind and keep on practicing. I am still taking lessons regularly as well.
     

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