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Sweet Georgia Brown

Discussion in 'Music [DB]' started by Slaine01, Mar 12, 2002.


  1. Does anyone know where I can get a chart for Sweet Georgia Brown?
    Someone stole my Real Book yesterday grrrrrrrr
     
  2. There is a copy of the real book online.

    if the link above doesn't work, just type in www.realbookonline.com

    You can also get chord changes here but they're less accurate than the stuff in the Real book sometimes. I didn't see Sweet Georgia Brown on the real book site, but it is on this one.
     
  3. nicklloyd

    nicklloyd Supporting Member/Luthier

    Jan 27, 2002
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    someone stole your realbook? that's great....
    John Clayton (LA dbassist) tells everyone to get rid of their chord books. they do, and they have to memorize the tune. apparently everyone (except one student) thanked him later for that advice. :cool:
     
  4. Here is the overly simplified chart I used just last Friday to play Sweet Georgia Brown.

    D l D l G l G
    C l C l F l F
    D l D l G l G
    FE l FE l FED#D l GCFF
     
  5. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I hope they call you again ;)
     
  6. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    FE, FE? As the local boys say, "Hah?":confused:
     
  7. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    That would be:

    D-/F and A7/E, I guess. But judging from the chart, he would have been there ahead of time enough not to cause any further trouble :)
     
  8. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I hadn't looked at it like that, nor would I have played it like that (initially, anyhow) without some 'instructions for use'...
     
  9. This is how it is done on Stephane Grappelli's live in San Francisco. The F and the E are there. I think the bass player on that album is Rob Wasserman. I thought it was kind of obvious that the bass line was in "half" time. If you have the melody in your head that is. As the locals say around here if you think it's wrong why don't you just write out how you would do it?
     
  10. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    A strange local saying.


    Sweet Georgia Brown
    Code:
    D7            |              |              |              |
    G7            |              |              |              |
    C7            |              |              |              |
    F             |              |              |F7 E7 Eb7 D7  |
    -----------------
    D7            |              |              |              |
    G7            |              |              |              |
    C7            |              |              |              |
    D-            |A7            |D-            |A7            |
    F     E7      |Eb7     D7    |G-7     C7    |F (E7 Eb7 D7) |
    
     
  11. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Chicken and the egg problem there...how do you memorize a tune you have no music for?
     
  12. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    By learning it the traditional way; playing with older/other players and learning tunes from recordings and performances. Jazz owes part of its roots to African oral traditions.
     
  13. sean p

    sean p

    Mar 7, 2002
    eugene, oregon
    taking tunes off recordings is a far superior way to learn than out of fake books, in a few important ways:

    1) it trains your ear to recognize changes and methods of cooperation between players

    2) gives you a perspective of what an actual group performance of the tune sounds like (this is invaluable when it comes to familiarizing oneself with the nuances of accenting melodies and phrasing associated with jazz)

    3) i find i remember tunes better this way (whether this is because of muscle memory since i'm learning with my ears and fingers more than my eyes, or what, i don't know)

    4) ear training like this often results in improved soloing ability for me

    i heard a masterclass with mr. clayton a couple of years ago and have been focusing on learning tunes this way ever since. i love it.

    sean p
     
  14. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Sorry for the omission; Ray's changes are how I'd write 'em. And in my home state of Wisconsin, where I spent my first 25 years, I never heard anyone say that; usually it was yet another request for a Jerry Jeff Walker tune of some sort.
     
  15. It's a rather new local saying, just a few days old actually.

    Wisconsin has moved on from Jerry Jeff.. Lynard Skynard is the rage.
     
  16. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    I'm headin' home in about a month, can't wait! Beer and brats, fishin', and roads that actually go somewhere. My Dad is borrowing the old high school DB for me to play while I'm there; after 3 weeks of playing it, I'll have the Chops of Death.
     
  17. Which corner of the Dairy State are ya from, dere hey?
     
  18. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Up North; born in Rhinelander, raised near Minocqua. I'm almost a Yooper: Mom makes a mean pasty.