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Table saw blades - Lams, glue up, etc.

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by chinjazz, Dec 19, 2017.


  1. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Hey folks,

    I couldn't resist a sale I found on a portable table saw. Things I liked was the portability and size due to my severe lack of space. Now that I know how to make laminates with a band saw, and surfacing them with a router I've set my sights on going down this path.

    I'm definitely highly focused on safety (covered here by LonnyBass).

    Here's what I've got now in a box ready for assembly:

    Shop Kobalt 15-Amp 10-in Carbide-Tipped Table Saw at Lowes.com
    A review:

    Price was right and features work for me and I liked the surface as opposed to those that have holes or made out of a composite.

    I want to get a decent blade(s):

    Firstly, for mainly cutting lams, and of course another general purpose one for making jigs, etc.

    This Freud Glue line rip blade is up there in cost for lams:

    LM74R010 Glue Line Ripping Circular Saw Ripping Saw Blade 10" x 5/8" Bore x 30 Tooth

    As I understand what I've read, this blade coupled with the right technique would produce glue up ready edges..

    Anyone have experience with some lesser pricy ones?

    Thanks for any input :)
     
    Freekmagnet likes this.
  2. Thumb n Fingers

    Thumb n Fingers

    Dec 15, 2016
    I will forever swear by Woodworker II blades. They are NOT less costly, but lots of carbide (you could sharpen these over and over, ad nauseam) that seems to stay sharp forever, which for me is a positive tradeoff to having redundant blades. Cuts everything like butter, balanced wonderfully, leaves a very clean edge. Once there is a gum buildup on it, I usually soak it in kerosene in a shallow pan for about an hour then soft bristle brush clean it, dry it and oil it, and it's good as new.

    I have a Freud Diablo (not a Glue Line Rip, mind you) and, while it is a pretty nice blade, they do not stay sharp nearly as long as the Woodworker, and the coating eventually started to wear and then burned wood if I cut too slowly. really minor complaints, but if I rate a woodworker 10 out of 10, this got about a 7.
     
    Hoochie Coochie Man and chinjazz like this.
  3. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Thanks for the input :)

    Certainly getting up in price, no problem as I’m still researching. Just like in the case with router bits (can’t skimp and expect miracles).

    I was reading that a thinner blade might be desirable for smaller table saws. This one I have will run at 5k rpm. Any thoughts?
     
    Thumb n Fingers likes this.
  4. Thumb n Fingers

    Thumb n Fingers

    Dec 15, 2016
    Yep, router bits (Whiteside are the best I've found) and saw blades I just won't skimp on. Other things I'll cut corners when I can. I'm using a Woodworker in a pretty larger Delta Professional (contractor size) saw that's pretty stable.

    I have also heard the thinner kerf stability thing, but I've never really A/B'd blade kerfs in a smaller saw. That Freud looks like .118 thin kerf. Forrest makes a Woodworker thin kerf at .100 also WW10401100 Woodworker II 10" 40T #1 Grind Thin Kerf

    I think the one I use is a 40 tooth, .125 kerf. https://www.amazon.com/Forrest-WW10...&qid=1513694636&sr=8-1&keywords=woodworker+II
     
    chinjazz likes this.
  5. Aberdumbie

    Aberdumbie

    Jan 22, 2016
    South Carolina
    You can get blade stabilizers for the thin kerf blades. They look like giant thick fender washers. Craftsman sells them at Sears. I use them with all my blades and always produce a presentable glue joint. Get one of those small stew engineers squares. The kind that stands on end and is maybe 2” High. Lay it next to your blade and check it for plumb when you are cutting glue joints..... And for heavens sakes. Use push sticks. I was cocky and didn’t use them. It cost me almost a year from my bass.
     
    Hoochie Coochie Man and chinjazz like this.
  6. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Thanks for the advice! Sorry to hear about the accident.

    I was at Woodcraft today and saw some Freud glue line blades and the thin kerf one was a few bux cheaper than the others.

    Mind my asking what blades you use?
     
  7. Aberdumbie

    Aberdumbie

    Jan 22, 2016
    South Carolina
    That was years ago thankfully.... I had three custom blades made 25 years ago. One rip, one crosscut and one general purpose. I get the sharpened and re-toothed a couple time a year. It cost a lot atvthe time but I’ll never have to buy a blade again.... But blades made today are way better by leaps and bounds than they were back then. I have used Freud blades and loved them. But I haven’t purchased a table saw blade since the 1990’s. FDCBE59A-45BB-4170-8C15-A08B610F18B8.
     
    chinjazz likes this.
  8. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Thanks again!

    I have a few things to consider. Thick or thin kerf. I think I can do both on this saw (checking on that). Many advantages on thin but stability with stabilizers....
     
    Aberdumbie likes this.
  9. Aberdumbie

    Aberdumbie

    Jan 22, 2016
    South Carolina
    No worries. Look up blade sharpening services in your area. A good service can even braze broken carbide back on the tips of your blades. And compared to replacing a blade, the sharpening services are extremely affordable. Find the blade that you like and never buy another. I partnered up with a cabinet shop buddy. He includes my blades in with his so I get his commercial sharpening rates.
     
    chinjazz likes this.
  10. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    I’ve lusted after a Woodworker II blade for years, never quite pulled the trigger, to my detriment. I’ve never had great luck with thin kerf, but I used them without stabilizers, seemed like I got as good or better results with standard kerf that don’t flex in deep cuts. I don’t see any great advantage to thin kerf except in underpowered saws, but that’s a whole other kettle of fish. Spend some time making sure the blade is perfectly parallel to miter slots and fence, it may not come out of the box perfectly set up. I bought a small Delta jobsite saw for rough carpentry and found it was WAY out from the factory. Lots of good videos on how to do this, I used Mark Duginske “Mastering Woodworking Machines” as my bible, but in the Youtube age, one picture....
     
    chinjazz and Aberdumbie like this.
  11. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Great tip, thanks :). I’m sure there’s a decent sharpening service here in Jax.
     
    Aberdumbie likes this.
  12. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    I assembled my Kobalt last night and will dial in the blade setup after work today.

    In what I was finding in cyberspace, I was concluding a regular kerf might suffice.

    The Kobalt is a 15amp, 5000 rpm unit much like the better ones a few hundred bucks north.

    At the moment I’ve got a few Freud’s in my wishlist on Amazon, but this one seems just about right as my first choice:

    LM74M010

    https://www.amazon.com/Freud-Glue-Ripping-Blade-LM74M010/dp/B00006XMTU

    It’s got s max 8000 rpm, 1/8” kerf, 5/8” Arbor and 30T

    Thanks @Gilmourisgod!
     
    Aberdumbie likes this.
  13. Aberdumbie

    Aberdumbie

    Jan 22, 2016
    South Carolina
    That will make you a very nice blade for ripping acceptable glue joints. The ideal rip blade would be a flat top bevel blade. The blade you are looking at is a triple chip blade. You will want to be familiar with blade terminology and I'll post a link below that helps explain that.

    Now I have experienced a few woodshop injuries. And one of my more memorable experiences was having a cut off bind against my fence and shot back at me with such force it cracked a rib. Had it hit me end on it would have pierced me like an arrow...... I am OCD about my saw set up and for years had my fence set dead square with my blade. I would suggest that you set the outfeed side of your fence a very slight 1/16" out to prevent cut offs from binding between the blade and fence. It does not affect your cut and relieves the pressure when feeding between blade & fence. May go against what some believe. But I know it works well for me.

    Saw Blade Terminology
     
    chinjazz likes this.
  14. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Thanks so so much on sharing your experiences! The thought of being hit with and arrow is eye opening.

    Setting the outfeed a slight 1/16” out does make sense. Similarly on my band saw I adjust to drift and almost always use the fence on the right side to get the most straight cut as I can, and don’t have a trapped bind up with left side fencing.

    Just similar but not the same.

    I humbly recognize the sheer force and speed of what happens with kickback. I saw an interesting video with someone who made a jointer jig for their TS and it basically had that outfeed being out a bit being part of it.
     
    Aberdumbie likes this.
  15. Aberdumbie

    Aberdumbie

    Jan 22, 2016
    South Carolina
    Last old guy woodshop secret and I'll hush up and go play my bass..:).... A generous coating of Johnsons paste wax on table tops and fences go a long way toward helping to keep your work sliding through. Have fun and make lots of sawdust.
     
    Ben B, chinjazz and Gilmourisgod like this.
  16. Gilmourisgod

    Gilmourisgod

    Jun 23, 2014
    Cape Cod MA
    1/16” on the outfeed sounds way big, I think Duginske recommends a few .01”. I have witnessed kickback of a 1x3 on a Rockwell 3hp cabinet saw, flew thirty feet and penetrated three layers of drywall like a cookie cutter.
     
    chinjazz likes this.
  17. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Wow! Glad my saw is “underpowered”. I’ll check more into dialing in that outfeed amount more :)
     
  18. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Yes indeed! Got the J paste wax. Oh yeah, forgot that I love bass playing too!!
     
    Aberdumbie likes this.
  19. Paulabass

    Paulabass

    Sep 18, 2017
    All good advice here. I'll just add, throw something heavy (50lbs.) on the base of your stand. I use a bag of concrete, cause that's what I had around. I had been ripping on my portable a few times, and noticed I was lifting the front legs- I assume you do not want to knock your saw over. cheers.
     
    chinjazz likes this.
  20. chinjazz

    chinjazz Supporting Member

    Sep 11, 2002
    Atlantic Beach, FL
    Good idea! I thought about that, and one of the reviews on my particular one got me thinking about that. Cheers!
     

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