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Taking it to the next step

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by Mr. RC, Jan 20, 2003.


  1. Mr. RC

    Mr. RC

    Oct 31, 2002
    New York, NY
    I would describe myself as an advanced jazz bass player. I have a good concept of be-bop playing (Paul Chambers, Ray Brown, ect.) however I am trying to move my playing to the next level and make my vocabulary a little more "hip" (Dave Holland, Ron Carter, ect.). I am looking for a book that will help me modernize my playing. I've been thinking about getting Concepts for Bass Soloing but I have ordered John Goldsby's new book. Will John Goldsby's book be sufficiant or should I also order the Sher and Johnson book? Or should I look elswhere for material to help take me in the direction that I want to go? Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Sorry but I don't think buying a book will make your playing that much more "hip". There are so many excercises and stuff you can do w/o a new book. Also, there's always transcription....
    Taking lessons with a great teacher is also very useful....

    but then again, you're the advanced bass player...
    /lovebwn

    PS.if you haven't already check out dave liebman's book "a chromatic approach to jazz harmony and melody" which covers a lot of of playing "hip"
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I just spotted the big difference between the BG forum and this one! Somebody who posted this kind of thread in BG would be 15 not 16 !! ;)
     
  4. Mr. RC

    Mr. RC

    Oct 31, 2002
    New York, NY
    Sorry to sound arrogant but I didn't mean advanced in that manner. A lot of times people tend to not take you seriously in these forums so I would like to let people know that I am not an amateur and know what I doing. I guess I'll change that to intermediate to advanced student. Thanks for the tip Lovebown I guess I will check out the Leibman book. I'm also goinig to get into some new transcription of Holland and other more modern bass players which are offered in an e-book.
     
  5. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Good luck!

    Going back to the shed now...

    /lovebown
     
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I was only kidding!! ;)

    I have met 15 -17 year-olds at Jazz workshops or classes who can teach me stuff and they also seem to improve at a much faster rate than I do!! :eek:

    I think John Goldsby's book would be a good step; although if you're thinking about advanced Jazz concepts, then for me, there's nothing to beat Mark Levine's Jazz Theory Book.
     
  7. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Except the fact that Amazon.co.uk have decided they now don't have it :(
     
  8. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I get my music books from :

    www.sheetmusicplus.com

    It's always cheaper, even allowing for shipping, as prices in the US are so much lower than UK!

    Or if you don't like buying from overseas, then JazzWise in the UK are very good - I have bought lots of Jazz books from them as well. Quicker, but more expensive.
     
  9. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Enthusiastic dittos on the Levine and Liebman recommendations. And though I'd normally agree that buying a book won't make you more hip, I found the Sher/Johnson book to be very inspiring and a great "rut-buster".
     
  10. You can't play hip until you can hear hip. When you hear a hip phrase, you have to be able to identify what each note meant relative to the change and relative to the moment. An example of what I mean is playing the major 7th on one. First you have to know you're doing it, then you have to know when it will work and when it won't, and you have to know how you'll follow it. You have to know the difference between creating tension and just playing a bad note. If you know your theory, you won't have to buy a book of hip lines; you'll listen to hip players and know what rule they're following or challenging, and when, where, and why.
     
  11. Mr. RC

    Mr. RC

    Oct 31, 2002
    New York, NY
    Thanks for all the tips guys. I definitely see what your saying Ed and didn't mean to sound the way that you percieved my comments. Micheal Bowie told me one of the reasons he likes me so much is because I am humble. On the other hand I have enough confidence to know what I am capable of and wanted to let you guys know that also. Thanks for the tips about playing what I hear Don. I've definitely been trying to do that along with augmenting my studies with transcriptions. Once again thanks for all the tips and the lesson.
     
  12. I agree with Ed, and the others. A book is not really gonna do it. I know some jazz guitar players who think Mark Levines book is pretty basic (I am definitely not including myself in that category!) I have'nt seen all the books available, but I use Marc Johnson's Sher book when I want to get out of a rut, but then I dont take my jazz playing very seriously these days. I'm getting too many country and rockabilly gigs on DB!! (and they pay better!)
     
  13. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    I heard that! The best bucks for me recently have come from the classical and high-profile Hawaiian gigs. Doesn't stop me from playing bread n' butter jazz gigs, though.
     
  14. LOL! It does'nt stop me either, but being the only DB player in town who will play country/honkytonk/blues/rockabilly styles is filling up my diary very nicely.