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Talk me out another cabinet...?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by slap-a-da-bass, May 3, 2010.


  1. slap-a-da-bass

    slap-a-da-bass

    Sep 28, 2009
    Hey,

    I play other instruments, but fairly new to bass. I've had two gigs over the last two weekends, both had PA support with subs. I have a Carvin BX500 with a BRX10.2 cab. I made it through both gigs with just my 210 cab and my amp not even 1/2 way up, but I'm still gassing for another cab. Is there a reason I should be looking or another 210 or 410 to add to my current rig? I'm pretty happy with the BRX cab. I've compared it to my son's Avatar 410 neo, and I think it's got more low end and clarity. I should also through it the mix, the bass player in the band after us had an Ampeg 810, and it kicked the crap our of my sound. It was huge on stage, but I keep my volume low so the guitar players can hear themselves.

    Also thinking about building a fearful 12/6 or a BFM Jack 210. From what I've read, I could expect tone for days with excellent projection.

    I feel like I'm in a hurry to have a great sound, but not really sure how to get there.

    Any comments?
     
  2. xed

    xed Supporting Member

    Dec 8, 2007
    Coastal NC, USA
    Just remember 1 thing... no matter what venue you play your sound will either be through the FOH or you won't have any PA support and it will be all up to your stage amp.

    If its a FOH situation (larger) then odds are you're going to have your sound taken to the board by a DI which will bypass your cabinet. If you're lucky you might get someone running sound that takes a DI and mics you but if that happens then they're probably a bass player too. ;)

    If it's not a FOH situation (smaller) then it's up to you to be heard.

    Take that for what you will, if you're in a FOH just your rig is essentially a stage monitor. Since you already have a 2x10 then I suggest you consider picking up another 2x10 or maybe a 4x10. Take both cabs to gigs without FOH support and just take your 2x10 to gigs with FOH support.

    Having a 2x10 and a 4x10 allows a ton of flexibility because you've got 2x10, 4x10 and 6x10 configurations available to you. Just make sure that your equipment can handle everything. I looked and I think you're 2x10 is a 4ohm cab and your head says that it can run 2ohm "limited" (not sure what that means though).
     
  3. slap-a-da-bass

    slap-a-da-bass

    Sep 28, 2009
    I most cases I'll have FOH or reinforcment. The Band I'm currently with has a full PA system, and I also have my own system from my last band.

    Any comments on my gear? I really like it, but my experience has been limited to trying 4 heads, including Eden Nemisis line, GK mb, Ampeg 2BRE, and the Carvin. Cab's I've tried have been the Carvin I have now, Avatar 410 neo, and an Nemesis 210. Kind of strange, out of all the gear I've tried I liked the Eden gear the least, but it's not the real deal from them.

    How about the Fearful or BFM cabs?
     
  4. I love the Eden EN260 head. I have it paired with an Eden D410XLT. Killer Rig. The trick with those heads (as with any head) is to set it up properly. I tried an Ampeg svt6 pro head, and the Eden blew it out of the water. Give it a shot, and play it through a nice cab. I honestly have not tried the Eden Nemesis cabs so I cannot respond to that. I have heard great things about the Avatar, and I may be getting a 2x12 for practice.
     
  5. craig.p

    craig.p

    Sep 28, 2008
    New Hampshire
    Yeah, I'll talk you out of another cabinet. Be careful. The more "rig" you run on stage, the more variables/headaches you're creating for the sound man in the frequency range you're covering. Once your signal goes through the mains, it's a whole different ball game with a whole 'nother set of rules and it's no longer all about you (sorry) -- it's about the sound out front and what you can do to keep from kneecapping it. A good place to start is by using the minimum possible onstage kit, not by adding onto what you already have.
     

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