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Teachers of DB

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by mr. pink, Jun 17, 2001.


  1. mr. pink

    mr. pink

    Jun 17, 2001
    Hello everyone,
    I am new to the site and new to the world of double bass and would like to know of any teachers of db in my area. I live in Birmingham, England. The style does not matter as it is purely to see if i am able to make the transition from bass guitar and of course if i will enjoy it. I am also presuming that a teacher will have a bass for me to play, is that always the case? Thanks for your time.
     
  2. Hey,

    Welcome to talkbass.com...

    ...rash assumption - if you were a school/college then you might be able to get a loaner, but I don't know of any private teachers (here in the US, at least) who provide loaners for their students. You will need something on which to practice in between your lessons. Double-bass is totally different to Electric Bass Guitar - different sound, different style, different technique. You're going about it the right way by looking for a good teacher. Seek their advice re. getting a Double-Bass. Once you've got one, and start really getting into it - you'll never look back...

    Good Luck, and welcome again...

    - Wil
     
  3. dhosek

    dhosek

    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    You'll find that for your own use, you'll end up renting or buying. Figure in the neighborhood of $100/mo to rent a decent bass (some shops will let you apply the entire rental cost to the purchase of the instrument).

    -dh
     
  4. ChrisRae

    ChrisRae

    Jan 25, 2001
    North Wales, UK
    Mr Pink,
    My brother used to study with Tom Martin who I think is with the CBSO, but I am not sure. If not him, try getting hold of the one of the Bass players from one of the decent orchestras, they should be able to give you a good grounding. Maybe even try some music colleges.


    HTH

    Chris
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    You could alway try :

    www.basslessons.com

    which has a teacher database and lots of links to education sites.

    I also think that the style will matter, as there will be a difference in what a "classical" or orchestral player will teach you as compared to a Jazz player. I imagine that the Jazz player wouldn't necessarily start with Bowing techniques, but the orchestral player almost certainly would?

    I have also found that I have "enjoyed" studying Jazz, but that the first year of a "straight" music degree I attempted seemed like just hard work. I know this is subjective - but I think you should be aware of the possibilities/options and how they affect whether you do actually make the transition successfully and enjoyably.

    I mean if I was playing music I hated, then I think I would be less liable to stick with it?
     
  6. mr. pink

    mr. pink

    Jun 17, 2001
    Thanks to everyone for their advice , you all made some interesting points.
    I had not thought about renting a bass which seems a good idea for someone starting out , however i think guidance from a teacher will be invaluable at this early stage . Does the CBSO chris mentioned stand for classical B'ham orch ?
    I suppose after that last statement you may have gathered i have no knowledge of anything what so ever classical , sums me up some might say , but from what i understood it is a good way to learn as Ed suggests . My real interest in DB came about from jazz so i would love to find a teacher who specialises in this . Anyway i'm going to check out the bass lessons site as well as making some enquiry's locally and see what options there are out there .

    Thanks again

    Mr. Pink
     
  7. ChrisRae

    ChrisRae

    Jan 25, 2001
    North Wales, UK
    Darn close mr. Pink,

    City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra,


    you might find that somebody at the Birmingham Conservatoire is a closet jazz fan and be able to give you the best of both worlds.

    good luck.
     
  8. dhosek

    dhosek

    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    Well neither of the CBSO bassists with bio pages on their web site (http://www.cbso.co.uk) list jazz aspirations, I know that a large number of CSO players do. In general, I've found (and this may be a bit of bassist jingoism here, but oh well), that bassists tend to be the most well-rounded of musicians. It's quite common to find bassists who enjoy playing in a wide variety of genres.

    -dh
     
  9. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well - I did phrase it as a question and I was just giving the benefit of my (very limited)experience - I'm probably just not very dedicated! But several times I have started study with "classical" guys and given up within a year and having learnt very little. Whereas I have found much more in common with the Jazz guys and have found the study enjoyable and can't get enough.

    Now I know that Birmingham is a much bigger place than where I live, with a very varied cultural life - there are loads of Jazz gigs going on, if you search them out - they're not going to come up and bite you though - as someone else said! Now in the place I live, there are quite a few pro Jazz double bassists who give lessons - there are 3 who live in the same street!

    So my view is that there must be some Jazz guys in Birmingham who give lessons on double bass and that this might be a better way to go, whereas the CBSO are going to be very "daunting" - I have seen them play and have many records of them conducted by Sir Simon Rattle and they are a frighteningly high standard!

    But then I suppose it all comes down to the individual - as I only got into Jazz approaching age 40, I felt that I wanted to get into playing quickly - whereas a teenager might feel that they have the time to start from a very good basic foundation and work towards a very high standard over many years.
     
  10. ChrisRae

    ChrisRae

    Jan 25, 2001
    North Wales, UK
    Bruce, for daunting, we could read inspiring? :)
     
  11. In my case, I thought I wanted to exclusively play jazz on DB, began lessons with an orchestral player and am really enjoying it! I guess I haven't decided "what" I want to play, only "that" I want to; thus any sound I can make with the DB is fun.

    I don't think that anything you learn from a teacher can be considered wasted knowledge, no matter what style you decide to play later. For example, there are many jazz bassists who use the bow.

    When learning arco, your left arm doesn't suddenly fall off; you still need to learn the basics of fingering as well. Any good teacher will get you on the right track. Absolutely, if you hate it, or begin to get frustrated, seek something that works better. But if you have a chance to get a teacher now, my advice is: go for it.
     
  12. dhosek

    dhosek

    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    And I would say that playing arco is essential to developing your left hand technique. The rapid decay of notes played pizzicatto will mask intonation problems that will be laid bare when those same notes are played arco.

    -dh
     
  13. I don't think it matters what a cat plays for a living. What matters is how the cat teaches and what he's teaching. The fundamentals are the same, the notes are in the same places, etc. One cat I study with studied with John Hood, currently with the Philadelphia Orchestra, but he's not totally an orchestra bassist. He has symphony gigs, jazz gigs, commercial studio gigs, you name it. Another cat I cop a lesson from once in a while studied with Roger Scott, former principle bassist w/the Phila. Orch., and he's only playing jazz. My point is that these cats both studied with classical cats, but aren't necessarily classical cats themselves. But when they teach, they use formal methods and insist upon proper technique, and I can easily discuss anything from Bach to Bird with either one of them.

    If want to learn how to play the bass, find the teacher that is best at teaching how to play the bass, what the cat plays doesn't matter, jazz can come later or on the side.
     
  14. mr. pink

    mr. pink

    Jun 17, 2001
    It's been good to get different perspectives on this matter especially the views on the style in which to learn . I am very impressed with the talkbass site Some of the techniques described such as arco and pizicatto were completley new to me but after a little searching on this site i have gained a little understanding of this new terminology .
    I have visited a few sites concerning teachers in my area but have had no joy as yet but i have been given alot more ideas on this so thanks to you all .

    By the way , chris are you from B'ham also?

    Mr pink.
     
  15. ChrisRae

    ChrisRae

    Jan 25, 2001
    North Wales, UK
    David, exactly what I was thinking!

    Mr. Pink, I live near Chester, so not toooo far away :)
     
  16. Tom Martin is an amazing teacher/player. He came to the University of Washington and put on a mastercalss that I played in. I'm not sure if he is taking on new students right now as he is he is persueing instrument making more now, though I know he still teaches.

    -Chris