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template-following router bits?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by tekhna, Feb 15, 2005.


  1. tekhna

    tekhna

    Nov 7, 2004
    Any suggestions for routing out pickup cavitys?
     
  2. Sure, get a template bit. That's usually a 1/2" or 3/4" diameter straight bit with a top mounted bearing guide. The template mounted on top of the work and the bearing runs along the edge. When I use a 1/2" template bit, I usually come back and clean up my corners with a 1/4" dia.

    Be careful with straight cut bits though. They can tearout worse than spiral bits in certain types of wood (walnut for me). You can make your own template bit by mounting a bearing on ANY bit. Like perhaps a 1/4" spiral up? That would be a great cutting bit with little or no tearout. The only thing you would have to keep in mind is that your pattern would have to be smaller by 1/2 the difference of the ID and OD of the bearing.
     
  3. CMT makes a pattern bit with shearing action, it should rule!
     
  4. Tho this is a seperate case, I make my own templates and use a plunge router with offset base... I also do the rider bearing bit thing with conventional templates (for J pups aor whatever) but I prefer the offset plate...I never have to worry about skipping or accidentally gouging from not having the bearing set right, and never run out of bit.