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Tenor Basses

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by rawgreenbean, Dec 27, 2003.


  1. rawgreenbean

    rawgreenbean

    Dec 27, 2003
    USA
    Yeah I've heard that they exist and I know they're tuned generally ADGC, but where can you get them? Like a under $800 version perhaps. Also, what are the pros and cons?
     
  2. James Hart

    James Hart

    Feb 1, 2002
    toms_river.nj.us
    Endorsing Artist: see profile
    Any bass can be set up tenor. I played a Carvin 5 strung E-A-D-G-B for ages.

    Just get a new nut cut for the thinner strings and a full set-up for intonation and such.
     
  3. this may be a dumb question, but what is the difference in sound than a normal bass? what type of music are they generally used in?
     
  4. Jmann

    Jmann

    Apr 29, 2003
    Lexington, Ky
    tenor basses are usually tuned adgc, not eadg like a standard bass.
     
  5. Arthur Poon

    Arthur Poon

    Jul 13, 2003
    Stanley Clarke uses a tenor bass quite a bit on the "Vertu" album. Stanley uses the tenor bass mostly as a solo instrument. Amazing stuff.
     
  6. how much did that cost you?
     
  7. James Hart

    James Hart

    Feb 1, 2002
    toms_river.nj.us
    Endorsing Artist: see profile
    I ordered the bass that way direct from Carvin in 1991... right around a Grand with my options. I had to ship them a set of Rotosounds in the guage I wanted.

    The Nut recut and a setup varies.... with a set of strings included it should be around $100. I do my own these days so I might be way off.

    Jmann: Tenor Bass Guitar usually means higher strings without the lower.

    4 string = ADGC
    5 string = EADGC
    6 string = EADGCF

    personally, I'm also a guitar hack... so it makes more sense to use a B for the C or an E for the F

    Crazy Fingers: I played in rock type stuff. I got the High B to be able to expand the chord voicings I was using.
    This was typical of my early 90's stuff
     
  8. Samie

    Samie

    Dec 13, 2000
    Madrid, Spain
    Sure but u will loose symetry. The great thing about the bass is that all the scales are the same not like the gutar were u must shift at higher strings.:bassist:
     
  9. James Hart

    James Hart

    Feb 1, 2002
    toms_river.nj.us
    Endorsing Artist: see profile
    Ummm... scales aren't generally symetrical. Shifting is always done no mater what the tuning. What scales are you playing?

    Besides I already 'know' note placement and chord fingerings on a 'Guitar'. It makes more sense for me to tune my 'Bass Guitar' like the instrument it was modeled after.
     
  10. Samie

    Samie

    Dec 13, 2000
    Madrid, Spain
    Scales are not symetrical but tone changes are symetrical on a bass in any direcction.

    If you already play guitar well b, e tuning might be great, many bassist dont. besides you might find it hard to on a 5 or on a 4. With standard tuning u just have to move up the neck. So u just have to learn it one.

    BTW the bass guitar comes from the DB not from the guitar ....the bass guitar is not from the stum family
     
  11. James Hart

    James Hart

    Feb 1, 2002
    toms_river.nj.us
    Endorsing Artist: see profile
    Leo Fender invented what I play. A bass for guitarists to play.

    The higher pitched version of a DB is a Cello, viola then violin.

    That said, you are arguing a point I stated in the post you first quoted... C & F are the norm and because of my guitar playing (I took guitar lessons because I couldn't find a 'progressive' bass teacher in the early 80's) I opted to keep the guitar tuning.

    And that being said.... once again, any bass can be set up as a tenor with being set up for it. something with a bridge pickup works best IMHO.
     
  12. rawgreenbean

    rawgreenbean

    Dec 27, 2003
    USA
    will a shorter scale help?