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Tenor Sax & Trombone range??

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Lovebown, Dec 13, 2002.


  1. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    I'm writing an arrangement for "Ain't misbehavin" thats gonne include a few bones and a tenor saxophone.. does anyone know how big these instruments' range are?
    That is comfortable to play and doesen't require a virtuoso embouchre .....

    thanks,
    /lovebown
     
  2. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

  3. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Hmmm... I don't know??? "Regular trombone"?

    /lovebown
     
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    The trombone player in my band plays both but mostly bass which has a lower range - he is always annoyed that nobody apart from me has ever noticed! ;)
     
  5. mt10125

    mt10125

    Nov 15, 2002
    West Virginia
    Tenors have a range of about a low B flat to a high D. Im pretty sure thats it.
     
  6. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Bruce - Hehe, I don't think I'd notice either...

    Ok, what octaves are we talking about here?

    /lovebown
     
  7. mt10125

    mt10125

    Nov 15, 2002
    West Virginia
    Tenor sax music is usually written in treble clef so the lowest you can go would be the B flat below the staff and the high D would be the the first D above the staff.
     
  8. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    The important thing is that Tenor Sax is a Bb trasnsposing instrument.

    "Normal" is Tenor Trombone - E below the bass stave (Bass Clef) up for about 2 and a half octaves.

    The Bass Trombone is quite common and range is a fourth below tenor.
     
  9. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Tenor trombone's practical range is E1 (same written pitch as low E on bass) to F or G above the staff.
     
  10. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Ok but that E is one octave higher sounding on 'bone than the low E on a bass, right??

    /lovebown
     
  11. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    thanks man!
     
  12. Let the bass trombonist solo for a while. Then everyone will beg for a bass solo. :)


    -Neil, bass trombonist
     
  13. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Ours is great - he is really popular and everybody comments on how great his solos are.

    I invited a friend along to a gig recently and the first comment he made was - your trombone player is very good!!
     
  14. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    The range on both is about twenty yards with a good arm. :D
     
  15. I teach trombone, so I would say that the range you put the solo in depends on what kind of sound you want, and the level of the player that is going to be playing it. If this is a real hot shot pro, with chops coming out of his ears, then you can write up to the 2nd D or Eb above the staff without a problem. If it's a talented high sclook player, I would stay below the senond Bb above the bass clef staff.
    As for low range, the lower you go, the instrument looses it's projection and singing quality. the best rang for trombone would be in the octave between the Bb below middle C, up to the octave above it.
     
  16. That's cool. Does he ever solo in his lower register much? (Not often done, for reasons of projection and dexterity, and some would say musicianship. :)) Or does he solo up in the mid to high range? (Probably the best choice most of the time).

    Well, there's singing, but you can't forget the growlin', though I guess it's probably not what he wants, anyway.

    -Neil, who is going to mic his rotor valves for a Fieldy sound...or not.