Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by scubaduba, May 21, 2018.

  1. Jim C

    Jim C I believe in the trilogy; Fender, Stingray, + G&L Supporting Member

    Nov 29, 2008
    Bethesda, MD
    Thoughts on this one?
     
  2. Ricardo Rodriguez

    Ricardo Rodriguez

    Sep 8, 2015
    I tried it and had high hopes after hearing so many good reviews on their smaller model. This pedal chopped off too much of the lows on my bass and I think this model was designed for guitar players. I personally did not like it at all. Unless there was something really wrong with the unit I had which belonged to my guitar player I wouldn't recommend it for bass.
     
  3. DirtyDuke

    DirtyDuke Supporting Member Commercial User

    Oct 13, 2012
    guelph ontario
    Partner Southampton Pedals, Partner CCP
    I have one and have had no issues with low end.

    It is one of my fav comps of all time and I have owned over 75
     
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  4. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    Thoughts on the Effectrode LA-1A Leveling Amplifier:

    I'm just going to come right out and say it. If you loved the Effectrode PC-2A I think you'll absolutely love it's big brother, the LA-1A. This thing rocks and is super quiet. In fact, it is probably the quietest compressor I have ever used.

    IMG_5701.JPG

    With the LA-1A Effectrode employed a parallel tube plate design and they claim the LA-1A is "technically the quietest pedal or studio leveling amplifier ever made”. This tube plate design is the type of tube circuitry only ever found in high-end tube phono preamp stages for turntables. According to Effectrode, Parallel tube design minimises the noise floor and maximises the signal to noise ratio of your instrument. It’s an expensive way of achieving noise reduction, as four identical input tube stages are required, however it yields stellar tone quality without the compromise of noise gates or ‘cutting’ certain frequencies with equalisation. The parallel tube design has never been built into a stompbox or even a professional studio leveling amplifier/compressor before, making the LA-1A something truely special. I can't confirm any of this, but I can't deny it either. The Effectrode LA-1A Leveling Amplifier is remarkably quiet.

    Let's talk dials and switches here. There are 5 knobs and two switches.

    IMG_4279.JPG

    The Peak Reduction knob sets both the threshold and the amount of signal compression. As the knob is rotated clockwise the volume level of loud notes is reduced relative to quieter ones, squashing playing dynamics. The effect becomes greater. This Peak Reduction reacts basically the same way as the Peak Reduction knob on the PC-2A. If you've used that compressor before, the way the dial responds on the LA-1A will be familiar. There is plenty of compression on tap and at higher settings it does get pretty squishy. That said, I don't think it makes the best limiter. It feels more natural at mid to lower compression settings.

    The Gain knob adjusts the ‘make-up gain’ and is used to match the relative levels of bypassed and effected signal. Effectrode says it can also provide +15dBu of tube boost when the ‘Peak Reduction’ knob fully counterclockwise (zero compression). Compared to my PC-2A there is not as much audible gain. Even though Effectrode says the PC-2A provides +15dBu, the PC-2A sounds louder with the gain dimed. I don't think it is my ear playing tricks on me either. There is a noticeable difference in volume. That said, I don't know why anybody would need more gain than the LA-1A provides — even at higher compression settings.

    Boost knob gives an additional +6dB of gain (on top of the make up gain) – this is useful when soloing on guitar or bass and can push the input stage of a tube amp into overdrive very nicely too. The Boost footswitch engages (red LED lit) and bypasses (green LED lit) the boost. Here's the thing with this boost though. There is a slight delay when activating the boost via foot switch. It sill let you down if you expect an instantaneous boost effect. It's about "one-one thousand" delay after stomping the boost switch. Still, I liked using it for a little extra "umph" on a chorus or bridge to bring out a little more volume. The boost is clean as the LA-1A doesn't really ever breakup. There is tons of headroom.

    Attack and Knee knobs allow the compression character to be further tailored. While later versions of the PC-2A had small dials inside the enclosure to adjust attack and knee, the LA-1A puts these dials on the top — easy to use. Rotating the ‘Attack’ knob clockwise increases how fast compression kicks in. The entire range is useful. My sweet spot was about 9:00 for a slowish attack allowing some of that initial transient (or punch) through. The Knee knob alters the input/output curve, i.e. how the LA-1A transitions into compression – rotate clockwise and the LA-1A compressor effect to be more obvious and counter-clockwise for smoother, more subtle compression effect. To be honest, I'm not sure which way I like better. All the way counter-clockwise and clockwise both sound great. I tend to prefer smoother compression... but the hard knee (more clockwise) really sounds great. I compromised and put the dial straight up as my point of preference.

    The Dynamic EQ switch is essentially a treble boost to restore some bite that can feel attenuated under higher compression. With the ‘Peak Reduction’ knob fully counter-clockwise (zero compression) dynamic eq is inactive, however as the knob is rotated clockwise, and the pedal begins compressing, the effect becomes increasingly pronounced. I was skeptical about the value of this switch for bass but am a convert. Especially when using a darker bass and higher compression. That treble boost effect is quite subtle but really makes a darker bass feel more punchy.

    IMG_0141.JPG

    The Bypass footswitch is true bypass and utilizes quiet true bypass switching to minimize ‘pops’ or ‘thump’ when engaging the pedal and ensure there is no loss of guitar tone when the pedal is bypassed. I never experienced any popping whether using the pedal as stand alone or in a pedal chain.

    IMG_5933.JPG

    There is a Balanced Direct Out ¼” TRS (stereo) jack socket allows connection of the LA-1A to mixing desk, computer soundcard or external audio capture device. It is fully balanced and transformer isolated. This Direct Out” option completely bypasses the Gain knob and Boost functionality of the pedal.

    IMG_6375.JPG

    There is also an External Select ¼” TRS (stereo) jack socket that enables an external footswitch to be utilized for remote bypass switching and activating the tube boost.

    The Effectrode LA-1A comes with a 12V center positive Wall-wart Power Supply. It does have hefty power requirements. Effectrode says a minimum of 1000ma (1 amp). The power requirements and the physical size of the pedal make it not the most pedalboard friendly. That didn't stop me from trying tough and I did get it on my Pedaltrain Nano+ (would work fine on Nano too) and managed to use my CIOKS DC7 to power it. Of course I had to use a CIOKS parallel cable that combines the available milliamps from two ports and also the red center positive adapter. I used two ports, switched them both to 12 volts and was able to provide 1000ma via the parallel cable. That worked and I used the Effectrode flawlessly with the CIOKS DC7.

    Here's a picture showing perspective of size.

    IMG_4218.JPG

    There is no LED indicating gain reduction.

    There are two gain stages. First is a grounded cathode tube stage. The output stage is a cathode follower circuit which also acts as a buffer. While the Effectrode PC-2A uses one tube for all of this, the LA-1A has three tubes. Don't expect the result to be a sound like a tube amp breaking up but there is enough harmonic content to give the pedal character. Yes, the pedal gets pretty warm.

    IMG_8271.JPG

    So how does it sound? Very, very good. I'm already a fan of the smaller Effectrode PC-2A and I thought the PC-2A was a quiet compressor. It is. But plug them both in side-by-side and you will discover that the LA-1A is actually more quiet. So quiet that in many settings you won't hear a hint of hum, hiss, or white noise whatsoever. The LA-1A is smooth, and just flat out makes everything sound better. There is no loss of highs or lows. Plenty of headroom even with high output basses. With low peak reduction, the lows seem to be less compressed than mids and higher frequencies which makes playing a 5 string through the LA-1A sound huge. Really, really good. Compared to the Markbass Compressore (another single tube compressor), the highs are less attenuated on the LA-1A which I personally appreciate. The LA-1A isn't quite as dark sounding as the Compressore. That may be a good thing or bad thing depending on your taste. While the LA-1A isn't exactly completely uncolored, it is quite transparent overall. But there is just enough tubey goodness going on to give it some character. It reminds me a lot of the Retrospec Squeezebox in how it sounds and responds. Worth noting that though the LA-1A isn't exactly small, it is handily more compact than the Squeezbox.

    I spent a lot of time A/B testing the PC-2A, LA-1A, Markbass Compressore, and Lightning Boy OP-2. The Effectrode LA-1A has a unique character. While it is quite transparent, it is adding a presence that many compressors simply can't. I'm a big fan of the Markbass Compressore but when comparing side-by-side, the LA-1A simply sounds better to me. It offers a wider feel and better low end response. More of the "studio feel" people talk about. I also like how open the top end feels with the LA-1A (even without the EQ switch enabled). The whole thing is has an inherent sweetness, while at the same time being punchy and full. Sounds great finger style or slap. The Markbass does offer more control however.

    If you read my review of the Effectrode PC-2A you might be wondering about the absence of the Limit/Compress switch on the LA-1A. That's a good question. I found that switch to be quite useful actually. I suppose you could dial in more hard knee (more clockwise on the Knee dial) and increase the Peak Reduction dial for a similar effect. I'd honestly prefer having the Limit/Compress switch on the LA-1A. Yet while the PC-2A has that external Limit/Compress switch it lacks external Attack and Knee dials and for me anyway, having the external Attack and Knee dials is more important.

    IMG_3653.JPG

    Compared to the Lightning Boy OP-2, the LA-1A is more neutral, less colored, and more open on the top and bottom. The Lightning Boy is perhaps the more "vintage" voiced compressor of the group. It has the most inherent harmonic breakup quality. The Lightning Boy has an overall darker quality.

    Is it worth upgrading from the PC-2A or choosing the more expensive LA-1A? That's a tough one. The PC-2A sounds very good and is one of my personal favorites. It's a great unit, taking up less real estate. To some degree the choice is like spitting hairs. The PC-2A is smaller and less expensive. Both the PC-2A and LA-1A are super easy to use. The external Attack and Knee dials are highly useful and have significant impact on overall ability to dial in the perfect feel. Both sound very similar — until you get them side-by-side. Power requirements aren't has hefty though still requires 12 volts and center positive tip. I doubt anybody would tell a difference when using either in a live situation. To a board or recording device, my vote goes to the LA-1A because it just has this brilliant spacial and full presence that does remind me a lot of the Retrospec Squeezebox. The Retrospec is probably more versatile overall (having an actual XLR connection, EQ dial, etc.) but it is a lot bigger and even more expensive. The PC-2A is probably most similar to the Retrospec in terms of its "bigness" and smoothing effect.

    IMG_5899.JPG

    The quality of the LA-1A is superb in every regard. It is an expensive compressor, but oozes quality and majorly wins in the tone zone. Is it worth the price and giving up the real estate on a pedalboard? I can't make that decision for you. As for me, I really like it. It is one of my favorites.

    Retail price: $469
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
  5. Ricardo Rodriguez

    Ricardo Rodriguez

    Sep 8, 2015
    Man, there must have been something seriously wrong with my friends' LA-2A compressor. Mind you I have compressors in the $4k category so I am no newbie here. Oh well. Glad it worked out for you.
     
  6. Dee-man

    Dee-man Supporting Member

    Apr 6, 2004
    SF Bay Area
    Thanks for the excellent review, Scuba. It matches my experience. The PC-2a is close enough and much easier to take to gigs. As others have said, the LA-1A responds very well to tube rolling. Both provide a very fun dip and swell when compression is turned toward the max. Also, IMHE, I find the LA-1A to have clearer and more sparkly highs than the Retrospec Squeezebox (although the Squeezebox sounds huge-r to my ears and can also get super spongey/rubbery). Two different flavors of awesome.

    And just so there's no confusion (I can tell you were cranking out this review to fend off the growing angry mob wondering where the heck your review is already :D), it's the LA-1A, not the LA-2A (the PC-2A is the smaller 2 knob pedal).

    Thanks again for your review. Once again, you've likely diminished the net worth of your fellow TBers.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
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  7. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    Thanks @Dee-man. I corrected the model number. Yeah, the PC-2A is easier to take to gigs. Overall though I do prefer the LA-1A. I’m going to have to try some tube rolling too. I do agree that the Retrospec is further down the spectrum of “rubbery”. I think I prefer the more open feel of the LA-1A.
     
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  8. mmbongo

    mmbongo I have too many basses. Supporting Member

    What a fantastic review!

    I thought maybe this was the be-all-end-all for compressor pedals. It's a marvel of engineering and design, they thought of EVERYTHING!

    And then....
    'There is no LED indicating gain reduction.'

    giphy.gif
     
  9. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    I do like gain reduction meters. With the Effectrode (both models) you can readily hear the effect though. Don’t rule either out for lack of metering. I know... it would be nice to have.
     
    petrus61 and ferarayabass like this.
  10. Frellin Smesh

    Frellin Smesh

    Jul 1, 2016
    London
    A compressor with no metering is like an equalizer with no frequency numbers.

    The whole "use your ears" philosophy is only useful in quiet environments.
    But, on noisy stages the Empress Compressor, MXR M87, Whirlwind OC, Becos CompIQ etc, can give you very valuable info on your signal compression/volume levels.

    It's funny how the Becos CompIQ Mini is able to fit a fully functional gain reduction meter on that tiny chassis, but many pedal compressors 5 times bigger always seem to neglect this important feature?

    I'd like to thank you @scubaduba for the excellent work you do on this site :thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2019
  11. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    Good news! I've got a Friedman Sir-Compre on the way. This is a compressor with a Gain knob capable of adding a bit of grit.
     
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  12. Jim C

    Jim C I believe in the trilogy; Fender, Stingray, + G&L Supporting Member

    Nov 29, 2008
    Bethesda, MD
    But no threshold indicator :(
     
  13. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    More good news. Also have a Wampler Ego on the way.
     
  14. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    Thanks. Appreciate that.
     
  15. Man, it's been a while since the last time I read this post...and @scubaduba you haven't stopped!! Awesome work!! Never heard of the Becos compressor but I fell in love with Stella...
    I love compressors and I blame you for making me think of buying more compressors
     
  16. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    You’re welcome? :)
     
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  17. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    If you can get yourself past the no LED indicator thing it’s a sweet compressor.
     
  18. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    Here’s a summary of the reviews so far.

    Ampeg Opto Comp: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Amptweaker PressuRizer: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    BBE Optostomp: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Becos CompIQ Pro Mini: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Becos CompIQ Pro Stella: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Bogner Lyndhurst: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Boss BC-1X Bass Compressor: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Broughton Apex: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Cali CB vs. Smoothie Suave Optical:Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Cali76 CB and fretless: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Few more thoughts on Cali, Smoothie, and Keeley: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Carl Martin Comp/Limiter (2018 edition): Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Darkglass Hyper Luminal: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Darkglass Supersymmetry: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Diamond Bass Compressor JR: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Doc Lloyd Photon Death Ray: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    DOD Milkbox: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    DryBell Unit67: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    EBS Multicomp: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Effectrode PC-2A: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Effectrode LA-1A: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Empress: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Fairfield Circuitry The Accountant: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    FEA DB-CL (Dual Band Compressor/Limiter): Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    FEA DE-CL (Dual Engine Compressor/Limiter: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    FEA OPTI-FET: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Fermata (Xact Tone Solutions): Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Forest Green (Mad Professor: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    G-Lab BC-1 Boosting Compressor: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Jackson Audio Bloom: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    J Rockett I.Q. Compressor: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Keeley Compressor Pro: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Lightning Boy Op-2: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Markbass Compressore: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    MXR M87: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    OKKO Cocaine: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Pettyjohn Crush: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Pulp 'N' Peel (JHS): Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Pigtronix Philosopher Bass Compressor Micro: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    PWNZOR (3Leaf): Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass and Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Refinery (Foxpedal): Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Retrospec Squeeze Box: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Seymour Duncan Studio Bass: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    Smoothie OTA vs. Smoothie Optical: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    SolidGoldFX Horizon: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Strymon OB.1 Bass Edition: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Swindler Effects Workers Comp: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Taurus Tux MK-2: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Union Tube & Transistor Lab: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Walrus Audio Deep Six: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Wampler Ego Mini after time in store: Testing compressors: Cali76 CB, Smoothie, Keeley Bassist, FEA Optifet, Seymour Duncan Studio Bass

    The Warden (EarthQuaker Devices): Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more

    Whirlwind OC Bass: Testing Compressors: Cali, Smoothie, Empress, Diamond, Keeley, FEA, Darkglass, Doc Lloyd, JHS & more
     
  19. scubaduba

    scubaduba Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Dec 23, 2003
    Michigan
    I have the new Becos CompIQ Mini One Pro Compressor on the way from Romania.
     
    Rojd, kesslari, javi_bassist and 5 others like this.
  20. Ross McLochness

    Ross McLochness Living Room Bassist Extraordinaire Supporting Member

    Aug 20, 2013
    Eden Prairie, MN
    That’s it?......(i.e. good natured ribbing).
     
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