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The Bassists of James Brown

Discussion in 'Bassists [BG]' started by The Owl, Aug 28, 2005.


  1. The Owl

    The Owl

    Aug 14, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    I wanted to start a thread on this subject, the bassists that gave James Brown his nasty, funky grrrrooooves! I'm sure there were many,but some come ot mind:

    Most famously, Bootsy Collins (who went on to become an intergral part of the P-Funk Mob!)

    Tim Drummond, who only stayed with The Godfather a short time, he used to get a lot of flack just simply for being white from people outside the band). Tim was a killer player with lots of soul and a distinctive "walk" in his bass playing.

    Bernard Odum

    Post away with comments, observations, names etc------
     
  2. morebass!

    morebass! I'm listening

    May 31, 2002
    Madison WI
    I dig them all. Heck I'd probably lay it down pretty good with James kickin' my a$$ every night.

    I assume you saw the Bass Player article? Lots of good info there. Bootsy on the cover probably sold some issues but I came away thinking that he was not a huge part of the history.
     
  3. The Owl

    The Owl

    Aug 14, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    Very true, Bootsy wasn't in for avey long stretch at all but the time he was in, he kicked some major ass, to the point I think he got fired by James for overplying ('ol JB was to put it mildly, a control freak).
     
  4. 43% burnt

    43% burnt an actor who wants to run the whole show

    May 4, 2004
    Bridgeport, CT
    Bootsy is my favorite. I've been listening to alot of JB's lately...amazing stuff!
     
  5. Lo end PUNCH

    Lo end PUNCH

    Jan 28, 2005
    Racine,Wi
    TM Stevens also had a stint with James.
     
  6. willgroove2

    willgroove2

    Aug 16, 2003
    chicago IL
    Endorsing Artist;Essential sound products,Dunlop, Ergo Instruments
    he didn't get fired for overplaying, he got fired for dropping acid before a gig and having a freak out on stage because he thought his bass neck turned into a snake
     
  7. The Owl

    The Owl

    Aug 14, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    YIKES!!!! :eek:
     
  8. I have seen Charles Sherrell play with Maceo Parker and Fred Wesley a couple times, and I would not count him out.
     
  9. johnp352

    johnp352 Supporting Member

    Aug 19, 2005
    Chicago
    Endorsing Artist: Rick Turner, GK, Malekko, Dredgetone, Pigtronix, Seymour Duncan
    Bernard Odum
    Charles Sherrell
    Sam Thomas
    Tim Drummond
    Catfish's brother Bootsy
    David Williams
    Hubert Perry

    and for all of you with 17 string or whatever it is this week, "basses"..AS fahnkified as the bass lines are the G!@#$%r lines....I mean now that you have the supersonic, only heard by bats range on your salmon platter like lute bass..why not cover the whole mess? I'd think doing the interlocking parts of Jimmy Nolen and Country Kellum would be a lot more challenging (not to mention FUN and REWARDING) then plowing through yet another stab at JSB..been there..

    SO...

    Pick up a copy of "The Funkmasters" by Allan Slutsky (better than Shadows of Motown..he wrote that too), and the boxed set "Star Time" by JB.
    Take some time..and learn how to play. Good Luck. Been at it 30 years myself.
     
  10. Ty_Boogie

    Ty_Boogie Bass, A way of life

    Sep 6, 2004
    The Bronx, NYC
    less strings-----do more, that's the short version I guess?
     
  11. johnp352

    johnp352 Supporting Member

    Aug 19, 2005
    Chicago
    Endorsing Artist: Rick Turner, GK, Malekko, Dredgetone, Pigtronix, Seymour Duncan
    is that a ....5....string bass in your picture?

    we have to talk...
     
  12. Ty_Boogie

    Ty_Boogie Bass, A way of life

    Sep 6, 2004
    The Bronx, NYC
    I own a 4.......... LOL

    I had to try it, I like it, and more than 5 is just not for me.

    everyone has their likes and dislikes, I don't agree with evreything, but I respect that

    now let me tune up my 5'er.......;-)

    silly aliens messing with it again
     
  13. johnp352

    johnp352 Supporting Member

    Aug 19, 2005
    Chicago
    Endorsing Artist: Rick Turner, GK, Malekko, Dredgetone, Pigtronix, Seymour Duncan
    ok..5..you know T..it might be a good idea after all..I mean if you break a string, there's always an extra one..right there on the neck ;) like a spare tire!

    and the "aliens" ? umm, no Ty..as you are in the Motor City..that would be the ghost of James..you know.."ty..all you need is 4..listen to Bernadette..Ty..one finger..4 strings..."
     
  14. Pick up a copy of "The Funkmasters" by Allan Slutsky (better than Shadows of Motown..he wrote that too), and the boxed set "Star Time" by JB.
    Could you elaborate on how Funkmasters is better than Standing in the Shadows of Motown?
     
  15. chilliwilli

    chilliwilli

    Aug 17, 2005
    i think its better done, everyone's parts are there not just bass and it just seems to have a lot of good info.

    I wish standing in the shadows of motown could be the same way with all the player's parts not just Jamerosn

    only drawback to funkmaster's book is that his tab in it which doubles the size of most pages and drives up the price
     
  16. Well, I liked the biographical info in Shadows. Plus the lack of TAB made me get my reading together and become a real player. But Funkmasters is great too. They both made me a better player.
     
  17. Sippy

    Sippy

    Aug 1, 2005
    Stuart,Florida
    That happens to me all the time.. psht.. like it never happens to you guys... right?.. *ahem*.. I mean NO! :bag:
     
  18. johnp352

    johnp352 Supporting Member

    Aug 19, 2005
    Chicago
    Endorsing Artist: Rick Turner, GK, Malekko, Dredgetone, Pigtronix, Seymour Duncan
    I think Alan digs deeper into what makes a groove work in Funkmasters. In JB's music, it's the interplay/interlock of the four main ingredients..bass/drums and usually two guitars..that make it work. By analyzing this interplay, you get a better idea of how the groove works. Granted, this is not the same as learning "Going to a GoGo" as played by (was it John Entwhistle?), but for my money and time, I learned a lot more from Funkmasters. I took the time and learned the guitar parts as well, and I programmed the drum parts into my sequencer..a good learnng experience, and something, as mentioned above, not available in Shadows. As an aside, it was interesting to mix certain parts together..a guitar riff from one piece with the bass line from another..I often came up with fresh ideas. I also experimented with turning guitar parts into percussion lines in the sequencer.. f.e. Catfish's guitar riddims made great cowbell parts..all of this helped me understand and enjoy James Brown a lot more.

    It'd be nice to have him do a similiar book on your tag line, no? Analyze the use of harmelodics in Ornette's work with Prime Time...
     
  19. cdef

    cdef

    Jul 18, 2003
    NET
    I seem to recall reading somewhere (maybe on the back of the first Jefferson Airplane LP?) that Jack Casady had "been on the road with James Brown" - can anybody corroborate that, or is it something I subconsciously made up?
     
  20. RobC

    RobC

    May 21, 2010
    Canberra
    Now that seems unlikely...

    My question is about Hubert Perry- the photo of him in the BassPlayer article on JB bassists shows him very clearly as left handed- can someone confirm this?

    Rob.