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The Boondocks.

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Wrong Robot, Dec 21, 2005.


  1. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    This show is great. Intelligent, stylish and clever animation, hilarious, excellent music, ballsy and modern. I have read the strip in the past, but I don't really read comics too much. The show is way good though. I don't even have a TV, but when I happened to catch a couple episodes the other day, I got my friend to tivo the rest.

    Anyone else been digging this show?
     
  2. NJL

    NJL

    Apr 12, 2002
    San Antonio
    Who's the tosser, now??? :spit:

    :D ;)
     
  3. Agreed, good stuff. I remember one dialogue scene that was taken straight out of Pulp Fiction.
     
  4. fenderx55

    fenderx55

    Jan 15, 2005
    NYC/Queens
    I started reading the boondocks when they the strip first got syndicated 3 or four years back and it is my favorite comic strip of all time. Initially my friends and I were unimpressed with the pilot but we said, "let's give it room to grow." A couple weeks ago with the rapper episode, I said, thank god i dind't give up on this show.

    Casting the dad from friday as grandpa was a stroke of genius.
     
  5. fenderx55

    fenderx55

    Jan 15, 2005
    NYC/Queens
    cartoon network sundays at 11pm (check local listings :smug: )
     
  6. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    I love the show.

    My dad was telling me that he was hearing some black people call in on talk shows complaining about it so Im wondering if there are any black TBers that could share some insight.

    Apparently a big part of it is that they feel that its characters are based to strongly on negative stereotypes.
     
  7. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    This is why I don't read the comic strip. I didn't even know it was on TV now. I gave the comic a chance when it first came out, but it just seemed like it was always complaining about being a minority.

    -Mike
     
  8. Mario Lewis

    Mario Lewis

    Jul 6, 2001
    Clinton, MD


    I am African American and I have to say that I actually LIKE the Boondocks. I got a totally different vibe from the show than I did from the cartoon strip. However, the humor, while a little dark and on the brash side, does keep me coming back. I’ve got people like that in my family,



    There are some negative stereotypes. But that’s one thing about the African American culture that never fails to disappoint… no matter the subject, no mater how taboo… it’s gonna be OUT THERE!! Why? I think it because our history consists of public demonstrations of our status in society. The old methods used to let us and everybody else know what was thought of us wasn’t a big deal then, so why should it be a big deal now. (I have an answer to that but TPA is closed) Current times don’t show that a lot has changed, thank you Katrina. What has changed is that no one else has to tell us we’re unintelligent & underachieving… there are enough African Americans doing that pretty well on their own with no prompting from society. Their actions, dialect, phrases, attire, demeanor, colloquialisms, conduct and frequent use of the “n” word in every other sentence are dead give aways.



    The segment of the African American community that are not in favor of public (or national) displays of that part of our community have the sentiment that it’s a bad thing because what tends to happen is that the stereotypes that negatively portray 1 African American character/person/community… 99.996% of the time, get attributed to ALL characters/people/communities. And I’m sorry…. I’m no thug…I don’t use the N word in my home or around my children, which I didn’t father until after I was married, and who I work every day to clothe, feed & provide for with no court order or public assistance. Every culture has it’s blights…. and it’s bright spots. For some reason, nothing but the negative images get air time when it comes to African Americans.



    Another troubling thing is the amount of acceptance and the comfort that society has with it. It’s almost as though it is preferred that we’re shown on COPS as the suspect or perp being pursued in the middle of the night. What is it about an intelligent, law abiding African American that society has a problem grasping. So much so, to the extent that a show like The Cosby Show gets the attention that it got for its POSITIVE portrayal of what African Americans COULD be like? I’m starting to get off topic…. sorry ‘bout that.



    So, yeah…. the Boondocks has my vote for it’s bravery for calling it like it is. It’s a little exaggerated, but it’s funny as Hades. Don’t think that every African American uses the N word as freely or listens to rap & hip hop & stuff. I know that the story is about a Grandfather that takes his grandkids OUT of the ghetto into a more affluent environment, and there are accolades that are due to the author for developing a story line around that…. but in the real world, especially today, in a neighborhood like that, there were probably already African Americans down the street a bit that DON’T act like that. Where’s the cartoon strip and television show about them?
     
  9. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    This is why I like the show so much. That's exactly what it's NOT doing. The show is really intelligent, and the way it presents racial relations is subvert and clever. Every character has quite a lot of depth and all their interactions usually bring up multiple viewpoints and perspectives simultaneously with no one being an authority. The show makes a lot of observations, commentaries, jokes and statements, but they are all varied both in the message and how they are presented(some are vert subtle, others are more obvious)

    I'm really impressed with this show. I hope it doesn't get the ax for being controversial.
     
  10. Mario Lewis

    Mario Lewis

    Jul 6, 2001
    Clinton, MD
    Respectfully, I offer that while you are entitled to your opinion, I humbly diagree. The show is very liberal with its use of the very stereotypes (i.e. Uncle Ruckus) that I (and a lot of other african americans) would prefer NOT be on television, or the 6:00 news or in the news paper.

    That you and others don't see how they're detrimental to the overall social perception of African Americans is what gives us angst. This is what I meant in my earlier post when I said that it seems that this is how African Americans are preferred to behave and conduct themselves. Why must me be social and cultural denegrates to get air time, press time or attention?

    I don't have anything against you Wrong Robot, so please, don't take this as a flame or anything offending. This is a spirited discussion and I'm just offering my opinions. Cool?
     
  11. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Hm, I see what you're saying, but I see the show as being so laced in satire and humor that any 'stereotypes' or generalizations are not only tongue-in-cheek but not meant literally and used only as a means of exposing the wrongness of stereotyping and generalizations. As you said, the show is 'telling it how it is' but with exaggerated elements.

    It's a tricky subject for sure and there are no easy answers. I think that aaron McGruder believes that his presentation and portrayal of all the contrasting characters and situations is fair, honest and meaningful. I think the show has a lot more depth than you are giving it credit for though.

    I do not mean disrespect either, and I am not offended. But, as it appears to me, and I could very well be wrong. I don't believe simply stopping so called negative stereotypes from being on TV is going to alleviate anything. McGruder's approach is to meet them head on and defeat them. Maybe? Maybe not? I dunno, All I know is that the show is very clever and refreshing to see. We shall see how it continues to present racial issues as it develops.


    (side note, I hope this thread doesn't veer into lounge territory)

    Oh by the way, I wasn't responding to your post, I was actually replying to the post above yours.
     
  12. Mario Lewis

    Mario Lewis

    Jul 6, 2001
    Clinton, MD
    Cool. I'm sorry about thinking you wre responding to my post. I guess I should have looked closer. My bad.

    Everythings cool.
     
  13. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Ya, I am very interested in your input on the topics of race relations though it's been on my mind a lot lately, if you'd care to PM me, maybe we can have a dialog?
     
  14. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    I think that a big part of tossing those negative stereotypes out there is the fact that they are incredible stereotypes and so over the edge that they are unbelievable. I think they are made unbelievable to drag even milder versions of the same stereotypes out of the mainstream by eradicating their credibility.

    I enjoyed the comic strip, but I enjoy the show more. After seeing the show I read the comic strip a bit differently. The fact that now those same words I read in the strips now have some more depth to them through "body" language and vocal cues makes it easier for me to understand what McGruder wanted to get across in those few frames I read every day.

    Thats another thing thats been on my mind. McGruder seems to be addressing the black community and saying "This is how we portray ourselves, maybe thats why things are the way they are." Huey was more vocal in the strips, but in the show he's a bit more quiet which helps to get that message across.

    They may not be main characters, but that family is in the show too. The little girl with the black lawyer father that's scared of being analy rapped in prison and the white mother make up that family.
     
  15. Nick man

    Nick man

    Apr 7, 2002
    Tampa Bay
    The show seems to put more blame on blacks than whites for the stereotypes than you might expect and puts it into a different perspective than before. Check it out. Maybe that point of view might help you get into it a bit more.
     
  16. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    I got that vibe from it. Still, it isn't something I care to have in my face all the time.

    -Mike
     
  17. Mario Lewis

    Mario Lewis

    Jul 6, 2001
    Clinton, MD
    I would agree.... the show does point a good amount of the blame squarely where I feel it lies. Which is the undertone of the comment I made above pertaining to the seemingly intentional underachieving segment of the African American Community.

    Bill Cosby made headlines a while back for putting the dirty laundry out there that has LOOOOONG been an issue within the African American community, that the biggest thing keeping African Americans from moving ahead is themselves/ourselves. Call me a closet Republican, but I am inclined to strongly agree. This is an issue that we as a community and culture have had a difficult struggle with. The Boondocks is just one of the ways that it is being addressed. It does a good job with it, but still.... the way it's done on the show is right there on the borderline. I think the fact that it's a cartoon and that it uses kids as its central characters keeps it on the passing side.

    I'm going to keep watching it though. I still think its a great show. Funny, contemporary, and something that I can relate to.
     
  18. LiquidMidnight

    LiquidMidnight

    Dec 25, 2000
    That's exactly the vibe I get from it. It seems to me that the creator is pointing out the stupidity that happens in both the black and white communities. I found that to be especially prevalent in the Gangstalicious episode. A lot of people (both black and white) and too concerned with portraying the image of a thug, and the episode pointed out how stupid it is to be one. It also pointed out how stupid it is for rappers to glamorize the gansta life-style. That's why I laugh every time Riley says something. He's not suppose to be taken seriously. He's a caricature of the guys who want to be thugs. Huey's a caricature of the self-righteous Spike Lee type of guys who hate white people.

    I also like the social commentary of the show. While it was a bit of hyperbole in that episode where the guys shoot up the convience store and the foreign owner is the one who gets arrested, it does say a lot about our social consciousness in America.