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The Electronics are shot!!!!

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Orco87, Jun 18, 2001.


  1. Orco87

    Orco87

    Mar 26, 2000
    Texas
    I have a Peavey T-40 (my first bass :D) and the electronics have been dying slowly. When first bought, instead of the input jack being on the side, it's on the front. So that led to one of the reasons of why the electronics are shot. Another reason is that it's an old bass. So I was wondering: does anyone have a good estimate on how much it would cost me to put all new electronics in it (excluding the pickups)?
     
  2. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.

    Do you mean what would it cost for a shop to do it, or do you mean if you do it yourself?

    Pkr2
     
  3. rllefebv

    rllefebv

    Oct 17, 2000
    Newberg, Oregon
    Pretty much everything you'd need to do the job in the link below. You'd probably need different capacitors. It says 'Les Paul', but basically any two humbucking pickup bass could use this kit, so this should get you going in the right direction. The stewmac site also has a pretty good section on wiring diagrams. Have a blast!


    http://www.stewmac.com/catalog/1.asp?name3=Les_Paul_Wiring_Kits

    -robert
     
  4. Orco87

    Orco87

    Mar 26, 2000
    Texas

    Basically both. :)
    I could do it myself, but it is a vintage bass so I don't really want to mess it up, but the only way to learn is to try. Do you know how much it would cost for the shop to do it though? I took my bass up to guitar center a while ago and they said they would charge $50 to look at it, and that was just to LOOK at it. So thus I come to you guys because I would like $50 to go into the repair of my bass and not just to simply look at it. I guess I'm kinda cheap, but I don't really have much money to spare. Anyway, getting back to the subject, do you know how much it might cost for a shop to do it?
     
  5. Do it yourself. Trust me, you're not going to ruin an irreplaceable piece of history by opening up your T-40.:D If you have decent mechanical skills and know how to solder, then go at it.

    As I have learned, even though you may not be an expert repairman with 20 years experience, since it is your bass, you'll do a better job than anyone you pay to do it. You have to live with it, so you'll care about the results more.

    And oh yeah, all you'll probably have to do is open it up, check and resolder all connections, and maybe spray some contact cleaner into the pots. Tighten all nuts on the pots and the output jack as well. Problem fixed 90% of the time with just this. Especially if one of your pots has come loose and the wire is wrapped around the pot from turning it round and round......

    Chris
     
  6. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    You have nothing to lose by attempting the repair yourself. If you talked to a shop that wants to charge you fifty bucks just to look at it, you need to deal with another shop. That's way too high.

    If you follow good soldering practices you are very unlikely to screw anything up. Just work slowly and carefully.

    If you choose to shotgun (replace everything), now is a good time to upgrade the original parts. The pots used in the Squire are not the best grade of parts available. Most any repair shop will sell you the pots , cap and shielded wire that you need.

    While you have the cavity stripped out it would be a good time to shield the cavity with either copper foil or shielding paint. The latter is the easiest and fastest.

    One caution: make a good drawing of where each wire goes and double check for accuracy before you remove or disconnect anything.

    The cost of the parts and shielding paint should be considerably less than $25.00. The shielding paint being the most expensive part.

    With a little elbow grease you can end up with a bass that's better than you started with.

    It's very unlikely that everything in your electronics has went bad all at once so it would be quicker and easier just to troubleshoot the problem and fix what's already there.

    Keep in mind that if you choose to have it done that a repair person in any field of electronics could easily repair your prob. If you know a TV repair person, a problem such as yours is a peice of cake.

    Good luck. If I can be of any help, just holler.

    Pkr2
     
  7. Orco87

    Orco87

    Mar 26, 2000
    Texas
    Dude, you guys are awesome! Once again I have self-confidence in doing something myself! Thanks a bunch. I didn't take that electronics class for nothing, so I think I will take stab at it myself. I have already opened it up once to see what was going on in there, (and then that's when it wouldn't sound out in an amp, but overlooking that :D) I also think that it just needs a couple of new things and I'm good to go. Please excuse my ignorance, but what exactly is a pot? I've tried using context clues, but I'd like to know what exactly it is. Thanks again!
     
  8. pot = potentiometer

    Chris
     
  9. Orco87

    Orco87

    Mar 26, 2000
    Texas
    *A cobweb of many is destroyed by the single moving gear of the many inside my head.* :D

    Maybe I didn't learn that much in electronics class, but thanks. Now A WHOLE LOT is starting to make sense. I think some more gears are turning too. :)
     
  10. Rock on with your bad self.

    Word to your mother. :D

    chris