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The Hal Leonard Bass Method thread

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by HelpImaRock, Aug 18, 2013.


  1. Yonni

    Yonni

    Oct 31, 2016
    Here’s a new problem:

    I’ve been following the first book and dipping in and out of other things as well. I recently joined bass guitar Pro lab. It’s a good resource for new to intermediate folk but I’ve run into an issue. When following a course on there using the third finger box shape I’m finding that I get pain in my fretting hand at the big muscle at the base of my thumb. Is this simply because I’m not used to using it after following the Hal Leonard method? Anyone else get this pain when moving on to one finger per fret? This is worst when I’m using mainly first and third fingers.
     
  2. I would be scared of any kind of pain while playing. Kelly Richie was facing carpal tunnel surgery and beat it with exercises. She says she's practiced up to 14 to 16 hours a day; watching her play, it's easy to believe. The three exercises look pretty easy and would be perfect when you take a break to watch the news and weather. I haven't tried them because my few minutes a day watching TV are spent using a Bullworker. I usually just do a few warm-up exercises before I play. I've also switched to playing a short-scale Jag because it's easier to go back and forth from bass to six-string.



    edited: I have to add that I LOVE the way the Jag looks, plays, and sounds.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2018
  3. Yonni

    Yonni

    Oct 31, 2016
    This isn’t CTS, this is more like cramp in the big hand muscle from either poor thumb position or getting used to using the third finger which is new after the 124 of Hal Leonard.
     
  4. I suspect a combination of thumb position and too tight of a grip. You only need a light touch. You should be able to play without having your thumb touch the back of the neck.
     
    Yonni likes this.
  5. 928cat

    928cat

    Aug 6, 2018
    USA
    Hope studies are going well for everyone. Any more of you guys from earlier in the thread still using this method, or are you done? What other books/methods did you move on to?

    As for me, I got to the end of book 1 a couple of nights ago. I'm not finished though, and probably won't be moving onto book 2 for a couple of weeks until after going over the book again. First I want to nail everything and so far feel really good with the second pass. I've been using slow, deliberate, practice after reading First Learn to Practice by Tom Heany, and some of David Moto's stuff. They have really been instructional, and using their techniques has been eye opening. Ed Friedland's method along with proper practice is like a one two punch.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2018
  6. 928cat

    928cat

    Aug 6, 2018
    USA
    Yonni,

    Check out this video by Adam Neely if you haven't already seen it. It might have some info that could be useful. It helped me when I was getting some discomfort in my left hand.

     
    Andythefat likes this.
  7. I'm still working through the method. I'm in book 2 and will move on to book 3 when I am finished with that. In part because I bought the 3 book omnibus and I am loath to not finish a book...

    Having said that, I work on other stuff too. I have the Ariane Cap music theory book, I learn songs, and work on some of the supplemental bass method books.
     
    928cat likes this.
  8. Usidore T Blue

    Usidore T Blue

    Jun 28, 2017
    I like the Cap book.
     
    928cat likes this.
  9. 928cat

    928cat

    Aug 6, 2018
    USA
    I actually have Ariane's book. It's at the printing store getting spiral bound, and I haven't seen it for two weeks. (long story). Does it complement the HL method well? I'm looking to gain a better understanding of theory that can ultimately help me play to songs that I don't have notation for, or only chords or piano music sheets.

    I also have Foundation Exercises for Bass by Chuck Sher in the mail. I will choose between it and Ariane's book to compliment HL Book 2, but will wait until the time feels right to take on extra material. I'm also increasing song work, so need to make sure I'm not overloading myself. It seems my 2 hours per day needs to become 3 or 4, and it very well may. lol. I do have the time and desire.
     
  10. Yonni

    Yonni

    Oct 31, 2016
    Yeah, I’ve been through that one several times over the last 2 years as well as many others (SBL, Studybass, ebassguitar, etc.). I’m beginner by to think that PillO is right. It happens more when I’m learning something new so perhaps I’m gripping tightly and not positioning my thumb naturally ( leading to bent wrists at times) as I get used to new patterns and stretches. Also, as I’m following theses books and doing ebassguitar at the same time I’m beginning to use the third finger more, which is taking a bit of getting used to. When I’m doing box shape riffs with the third finger it’s worst.
     
  11. ttp

    ttp

    Jan 12, 2018
    Palo Alto, CA
    I'm working through exercise 34 (finger rolling) and I'm having difficulty rolling the pinky without really stressing the fretting hand. Any tips or tricks to actually fret the C when going from G without stressing out the have?
     
    Andythefat likes this.
  12. Andythefat

    Andythefat

    Sep 26, 2017
    London
    Me too
     
  13. ttp

    ttp

    Jan 12, 2018
    Palo Alto, CA
    After messing around a bit, I've really developed bad technique I think. I've been playing more on the pad of the pinky, not the tip. When I really concentrate and get the tip instead of the pad I can roll pretty easily.
     
    Yonni likes this.
  14. Yonni

    Yonni

    Oct 31, 2016
    I think it was this exercise that made me realise how poorly I was fretting (pad, not tip). This combined with some John Patittucci spider practice fixed that.
     
    R&B and ttp like this.
  15. crunchysock

    crunchysock

    Dec 29, 2011
    Hi all, I just bought the book today after coming across this thread last week. I dabbled with bass for a couple months around 2011 or 2012, then I started school that required me to achieve a 4.0, then had a kid, so I completely stopped. I didn't try to learn any theory, I was just trying to learn riffs from youtube. Flash forward 6 or 7 years and I'm ready to give it go again.
     
  16. crunchysock

    crunchysock

    Dec 29, 2011
    I put in some time today and was feeling pretty good until I came up against Little Rock. It's the first time you actually play along to a music track and try to keep time. I'm horrible at it. I literally spent 40 minutes trying to get it, but kept getting lost when the notes would change from 1/4 to 1/2. I considered just moving on and hoping I would just "get it" eventually, but I decided to work it out. I found that if I kept the whole thing 1/4 notes (just plugging in an extra E or G when needed) I was just fine. I don't know what that says about me (I'm musically ignorant) maybe you guys know what it means. Anyway, I've stepped away for an hour or two and plan on putting in another 30 minutes or so tonight. Wish me luck.
     
  17. crunchysock

    crunchysock

    Dec 29, 2011
    Oh, and I don't normally have an issue going from 1/4 to 1/2 and back. Earlier this week I was playing along to this because I remembered learning a 1-4-5 blues progression in one of my lessons years ago.

    After playing with it a while I was playing different notes, some 1/4 some 1/2 in the same progression with no issues. So, I don't know.

    On the plus side, before starting the book yesterday I had no idea what 1/4, 1/2, and whole notes were or what they looked like.
     
  18. bfields

    bfields

    Apr 9, 2015
    Ann Arbor, MI
    So the problem might have something to do with the rhythm. I'd try to figure out how to break it into baby steps. Maybe:
    1. Put down the bass. Sit down at a table, count the beats (1-2-3-4-1-2-3-4...) slowly out loud and tap the notes along with them. (So for example on the third bar you'll say "1 2 3 4" and tap on the 1, 2, and 4.) Do this as slowly as you need to; one beat a second, or slower, is fine. After you feel comfortable, let yourself do it a little faster.
    2. Repeat the same exercise, but with a metronome instead of counting out loud.
    3. Pick up the bass. Rest your left hand flat against all four strings to mute them, then play through the piece while just plucking with your right hand in the correct rhythm. Again, play to a metronome set to a very slow tempo. You should feel relaxed and like you always have plenty of time to figure out what's coming up next. Let yourself speed up a little as you get the hang of it.
    4. Set the metronome back down to your lowest tempo, and this time try playing through it while also fretting the notes with your left hand.
    5. Once step 4 is easy at a good tempo, try playing along with the recording.
    Don't spend a long time at one sitting. Just give it your best for ten minutes, then move on to something else. Sometimes your brain needs rest and time to absorb something new. It'll be easier when you come back to it the next day.

    Be patient, take baby steps, and you may be disappointed at your short term progress but surprised how much better you get in a few days.
     
    Drestakil and ttp like this.
  19. crunchysock

    crunchysock

    Dec 29, 2011
    Thanks for taking the time to respond. Tapping on the table did the trick. I think maybe part of the problem was that I was so focused on calling out the notes as I played that I was losing the beat. As soon as I quit calling out E,F, or G, with every note I was able to keep the beat as the notes changed from 1/4 to 1/2. I kept at it until I could play it 3x in a row perfectly. Thanks again @bfields
     
    bfields likes this.
  20. bfields

    bfields

    Apr 9, 2015
    Ann Arbor, MI
    OK, so my 5 steps was massive overkill. But in general that's the sort of thing I do when I can't make my fingers do some rhythm--figure out how to break it down into smaller steps, work on each one slowly, then build it back up again. But yeah often it just clicks at some point. Best of luck with the rest of the book!
     

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