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The Last Question

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Selta, Apr 5, 2005.


  1. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
  2. Tom Crofts

    Tom Crofts

    Mar 15, 2001
    Interesting... Am I the only one who's bothered to read it?
     
  3. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    Looks like it... give it some time though :). I want some people to read it, cos there's a lot there, and I think it could prove a good discussion.

    Ray
     
  4. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    I'll wait for the Cliff Notes on that one. Or perhaps others can start talking about it, and then I'll join in based on what they say. :D

    -Mike
     
  5. Against Will

    Against Will Supporting Member

    Dec 10, 2003
    Big Sound Central
    I like Asimov's writing, and this is a nice short story with some interesting implications.

    For one, I see human being's dependency upon technology that they don't really understand. I also see a continuous growth; the fact that we quickly grow to fill any vaccuum that is created by ourselves (in this case, availability of energy), and a willful denial of the inevitable future. Also, I get the sense of Asimov's (like Arthur C. Clarke's) confidence that salvation for humanity will come from technological advancement.

    It's a little dated in respect to the size of the computers (especially Multivac), but there was no way that anyone could have predicted the impact they would have, nor the advancements they would make (Talkbass being a prime example of this).

    The only thing I have trouble with, is the idea that humanity will SURVIVE for that amount of time. I'm technologically pessimistic, and I think it's now naive to assume that people will be able to find redemption, or evolve, through technological means. The fact that the dinosaurs didn't even make it a billion years (I think it was 300 million...but I'm probably wrong, it's been a long time since I've read anything on dinosarus) makes the assumption that humanity (in one form or another) will still be around 10 billion years from now is pretty far-fetched. Yes yes, dinosaurs didn't have our developed brains, but they also didn't have a precarious environmental situation, nor did they devote themselves, as much as we do, to new ways to brutalize, maim and kill each other.
     
  6. Selta

    Selta

    Feb 6, 2002
    Pacific Northwet
    Total fanboi of: Fractal Audio, AudiKinesis Cabs, Dingwall basses
    See your quote for my thoughts on your thoughts :eyebrow:.

    Ray
     
  7. I'm divided on the idea that humanity can last so long. At first I found it a bit far-fetched, but if technology could advance that way and man could become immortal, it would definitely be a possibility. I don't think any of us could understand that... Asimov couldn't even predict the size of computers in our age (even a Multivac with our current technology wouldn't be half the size of a spaceship would it?)... it's just something you can't predict... nothing can. I found it extremely interesting, true or not, far-fetched or not. The ending is arguably the best part, suggesting that maybe such a machine (can it even be called that?) would exist in hyperspace. Cool article Ray!