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The longest rock epic! Download here.

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by sLapshock, Dec 20, 2004.


  1. sLapshock

    sLapshock

    Nov 12, 2004
    Singapore
    For those who want to download longest rock epic ever made by Yoshiki, you can downlaod it at the link below

    http://meroigo.mine.nu/Sounds/xjp-aol.htm

    This song is really incredible that it impress George Martin first time he hear it and that leads him to works with Yoshiki (Yoshiki offers was reject until he hear this song)

    This song also got a lot of solo's and scales. And i really love the time progression and arrangement.

    This one of the most incredible masterpiece ever released by human being ever exist.

    Enjoy.
     
  2. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    We have a Forum for Recordings. That is where this is being moved.

    This Forum is for Basses.
     
  3. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
  4. Wolfehollow

    Wolfehollow

    Jan 21, 2003
    Pensacola, FL
    anything that has the lyrics... stab the dolls of hate... in it is great in my book! ...but my pedagogy is lacking.
     
  5. Wolfehollow

    Wolfehollow

    Jan 21, 2003
    Pensacola, FL
    Its actually not that bad... Kansas/Dream Theatre meets Metallica...pretty good production aspect... electronic drums are a bit bright and punchy for my tastes. The singer is unique but vewy hawd to undewstand... cewtain difficulty saying his R's, but so do I sometimes. The R is not in the Japanese alphabet, so it is understood.

    I actually listened to it... so I thought Id give my opinion. :)
     
  6. sLapshock

    sLapshock

    Nov 12, 2004
    Singapore
    Its not electronic drums. Yoshiki (drummer/pianist of X japan) plays it on real drums. I dont what you think, but Yoshiki is one of the best drummer you can ever know.

    I got the "live" dvd and mp3 of this song. The live is very very great. I dont know how Yoshiki endure playing the drums for such a long time. He sure have a good stamina. Playing over human limits.
     
  7. FireAarro

    FireAarro

    Aug 8, 2004
    austr-
    ? 28 minutes isn't the longest... and some drum solos have been longer even. Just saying.
     
  8. sLapshock

    sLapshock

    Nov 12, 2004
    Singapore
    yeah, it isnt the longest. but like i said, download the song and hear how the drum beat goes. it is incredible until some people thought its played on electronic drums. :)
     
  9. Wolfehollow

    Wolfehollow

    Jan 21, 2003
    Pensacola, FL

    Ok... then I dont like the sound of the real drums... they sound too electronic... :)
     
  10. Wolfehollow

    Wolfehollow

    Jan 21, 2003
    Pensacola, FL
    playing it on real or electric drums has nothing to do with its validity... ?

    It was the sound I am speaking of, not the playing. The playing is decent all around... you need to listen to more music if you think this is the best stuff ever. Just my opinion... :)

    ever heard dream theatre? kansas? metallica? etc...
     
  11. sLapshock

    sLapshock

    Nov 12, 2004
    Singapore
    yup. but id ont like. i am more classical inclined. sorry. dream theatre doesnt work for me. overture is not that bad tho.
     
  12. From your first post.

     
  13. sLapshock

    sLapshock

    Nov 12, 2004
    Singapore
    yeah, i know it isnt somethign complicated but sure it is a historical composition. dream thetre six degrees of turbulance goes for 42 minutes and 2 seconds. but compare to Art Of Life its a total different genre, you did not need that much of stamina to play Six Degrees of turbulance. Art Of Life beat is fast beat.

    But i was amuse that guy said his vocal are weak.

    But its ok, people has its own taste aight?
     
  14. sLapshock

    sLapshock

    Nov 12, 2004
    Singapore
    Yoshiki's piano solo in Art of Life has to be at once one of the most controversial and brilliant compositions in rock history. Rarely has anyone come close to Yoshiki's dextrous use of this instrument in rock composition, and no rock musician that I know of can match his raw power and talent in playing. The piano solo in Art of Life is about seven minutes long with no extra accompaniment, and starts out simply enough with syncopated eighth-note chords in the right hand and single notes in the left, gaining strength and body as the left hand gradually enters with both chords and running notes, changing from eighth-notes to sixteenth-notes and then suddenly a few seconds before seventeen minutes, repeats itself all over again. Just as it is starting to become repetitive, you'll notice a little discordance in the notes. At first, that might be attributed to an overactive imagination from sitting through the same song for almost twenty minutes, or even a slip of the hand on Yoshiki's part (I'm sure that's happened before, even to him), but as the piece draws on, the discordance becomes more and more apparent, and by eighteen minutes it's very obvious that Yoshiki is consciously missing notes. The running melody is still there, but it is slowly pushed back by the seemingly random notes that intrude in upon what was a beautiful, simple line. By the nineteen minute mark, it has degenerated into the fine art of pounding.

    The discord has puzzled many an X Japan fan, but if you can get past the pounding and carefully listen to each note, it'll become quickly obvious that Yoshiki isn't throwing up his hands in despair and just playing the piano with his feet (though he might be doing some of that, who knows...it's Yoshiki, after all). There's a meticulous quality even in the most discordant of the notes in this solo. You might have to listen a few times to the solo, taking it as a whole rather than as two seperate parts, melodic and discordant, to effectively see the larger picture, but Yoshiki keeps the rhythm of the solo moving through the entire seven minutes, never stopping, never pausing, pushing the notes so that they seem to be dripping from the piano strings. This is piano playing - not just keyboarding or rock piano playing, but true piano playing at a high quality classical level. This is the level of professionalism that artists like Gackt aspire to but haven't reached. (Gackt's piano solo Blue, the c/w of Mirror, actually sounds like a more amateur version of Yoshiki's Art of Life piano solo, pounding and all.)

    If you listen even more carefully, you'll notice that there are not two hands, but four in the later part of this piano solo. I don't know the recording facts about Art of Life, but obviously Yoshiki must have spent hours in the studio by himself just recording these seven minutes (I don't even want to know how long it took to record the whole song). The four piano lines clash with each other in a dance reminiscent of the earlier dueling of melody lines between the band members in the metal section. Yoshiki's piano work becomes even more complicated at this point, with a constant stream of running sixteenth and thirty-second-notes in all four hands, using the full length of the keyboard to its full advantage. Yoshiki holds nothing back. He pulls out all the stops, pouring into the piano rage, grief, hatred, anger, sorrow, loneliness, passion, hope, joy, and pure ecstasy all at once. The piano, like his drumming, effectively becomes an extension of his own body and his own mind here. The music sweeps across the listener, jarring and painful in its discord, frightingly searing, almost orgasmic in its pitch.

    And then just as the pounding threatens to cause severe brain damage to all X Japan fans everywhere, Yoshiki lets up. The melody comes back, flowing softly through the discordant notes bit by bit as the orchestra enters once more. The random notes fade slowly as the former melodic line returns in a more refreshingly pompous state with the strings bolstering it, soaring to new heights. The piano gradually fades back into the background and then it is just strings, just as it was in the beginning. A swelling run up the keyboard (and maybe harp?) segues into a single-note rendition of the melody by the treble strings and a strong, solid bass line underneath. The orchestra slows and stalls at a fermata at 24 minutes, and then...
     
  15. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    Never in TB history has anyone defended their musical taste with so much verbage yet saying absolutely nothing.

    You could have just said you dig it and leave it at that.
     
  16. Benjamin Strange

    Benjamin Strange Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    Owner / Tech: Strange Guitarworks
    Ok, I listened to the whole thing. That was the most boring, pretentious, and musically unsatisfying thing I've heard in a long time. Do these guys wear capes on stage?
     
  17. Josh Ryan

    Josh Ryan - that dog won't hunt, Monsignor. Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 24, 2001
    Check his other thread.
     
  18. sLapshock

    sLapshock

    Nov 12, 2004
    Singapore
  19. LajoieT

    LajoieT I won't let your shadow be my shade...

    Oct 7, 2003
    Western Massachusetts
    Someone needs to listen to some more music.

    I HATE when reviewers say things like "most controversial and brilliant" and "rarely has anyone come close". It is usually an indication of their limited exposure to high quality music or that they are being paid by the band or label for the review.

    I understand it was not sLapshock who said/wrote this, so I'm not slamming him, or the point of the review (that the person REALLY likes this guy and his music), but the ultimate statements that the review started out with are rarely atributed to even those who deserve such praise, and often used to inflate those who do not deserve it.

    And a lot of the rest of the review is hillarious when taken out of context... :D