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The opposite of dead spot

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by Basgubben, Mar 31, 2013.


  1. Basgubben

    Basgubben

    Dec 28, 2007
    SWEDEN
    I play a '71 Fender Jazz. Rosewood fret board with blocks. There are no dead spots, but instead the C and C# on E-string are way louder than other tones. Is this a common issue? What can I do to reduce the volume? I don´t want to modify the bass permanently. Can a Fatfinger change the mass so it evens out? I use a compressor so it helps a little.
     
  2. If I had to assume, I'd say you found a resonant spot with the instrument or the amp. You could shift that resonance around with mass, either more or less mass on the body or neck.

    I've also found that different brand strings can emphasis or tame a resonance.
     
  3. Basgubben

    Basgubben

    Dec 28, 2007
    SWEDEN
    I have this issue regardless of strings and amp. So the thing is the bass itself. Maybe i should try changing the mass with a Fatfinger.
     
  4. bass32

    bass32

    Jan 30, 2012
    Oklahoma
    There are times that I will have a certian note stand out. Depends on the venue. When it happens it's usually the E and F note on the A string at the 7th and 8th fret. I find the frequency on my amps EQ and drop it. It's always worked for me.
     
  5. M.R. Ogle

    M.R. Ogle Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 5, 2004
    Mount Vernon, Illinois
    Backstage Guitar Lab owner
    I've seen this a lot. In fact, I'd say that happens on MOST of the basses I've played.
    Never bothered me, in fact I've used that known "boom zone" to shake a few rooms from time to time.
     
  6. pudge

    pudge Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    NY
    I had that on my '73 precision.The C note on the G string.Great for getting feedback it wouldj ust take off. Moving around lessend it but not completly.
     
  7. gwangi

    gwangi Supporting Member

    Jul 4, 2009
    Forbidden Valley
    Referred to as a hot-spot.
     
  8. ...or a wolf note.

    G.
     
  9. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    Wolf note or wolf tone is the most common term.
     
  10. M.R. Ogle

    M.R. Ogle Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 5, 2004
    Mount Vernon, Illinois
    Backstage Guitar Lab owner
    I thought a wolf-tone was an unusual (many times out-of-tune) overtone that is generated on top of the fundamental note being plated?
     
  11. The G string on most of my basses has always seemed more "Present" than the others. Finding a set of strings that balances those tones with the tones of the rest of the set can be the fix. My DR Sunbeams did it for my Spector.
     
  12. Jeff Bonny

    Jeff Bonny Supporting Member

    Nov 20, 2000
    Vancouver, BC
    They're notes that excite the body of the instrument and create artificial overtones. More common on acoustic bowed instruments but can happen on electric basses too.
     
  13. SirMjac28

    SirMjac28 Patiently Waiting For The Next British Invasion Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 25, 2010
    The Great Midwest
    Try a Fat Finger they work I have two that I use.
     
  14. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    The good plater I knew is out of business now, so no more plated notes from him. :bawl:

    :bag:
     
  15. 64jazzbass

    64jazzbass

    Sep 5, 2002
    Chicago, Il
    Another suggestion......learn to live with it and compensate with touch and technique. Two Fender players that come to mind who have lived with not so perfect instruments are Jaco and Marcus.
     
  16. M.R. Ogle

    M.R. Ogle Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 5, 2004
    Mount Vernon, Illinois
    Backstage Guitar Lab owner
    Plated? What the...

    Oh.


    PLAYED.
     
  17. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Rickenbacker guru.......... Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2006
    :D
     
  18. coyote1

    coyote1

    Mar 23, 2012
    Have you considered that the bass is one big dead spot, those two 'live' spots aside?

    :bag: :D
     
  19. n1as

    n1as

    Mar 29, 2013
    Years ago I had a MIM Jazz. C (3rd fret, A string) was weak compared to the B right next to it. Also had the standard dead 7th fret D on the G string.

    I replaced the bass with a Warmoth and that took care of the issue.

    - Keith -
     
  20. Remus_Redbone

    Remus_Redbone

    Dec 27, 2010
    Western AR
    If you can hear it with the bass un-amplified, it's a resonant frequency of the physical bass & strings (wood & metal). If it's happening only when amplified, it could still be the structure of the bass, but could also be the pickup(s) or the amp. The fact that a compressor helps a little sounds like the pups are resonant at that frequency.
     

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