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The Oprahs and Dr Phils of the world

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by Eric Cioe, Jan 13, 2004.


  1. Eric Cioe

    Eric Cioe

    Jun 4, 2001
    Missoula, MT
    Is anyone else sick of somebody with a microphone in hand telling Mr. and Mrs. Average America what to do with their lives?

    I'll delve into my reasons later.

    (Offshoot of the Gay Bashing thread).
     
  2. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    To be honest i'm more sick of people who blindly follow these "leaders" without coming to informed opinions of their own. Is it Oprah's fault that there is a legion of mindless idiots out there who think her advice is infallable?
     
  3. Eric Cioe

    Eric Cioe

    Jun 4, 2001
    Missoula, MT
    Very good point.
     
  4. miccheck1516

    miccheck1516 Guest

    Feb 15, 2003
    Ireland
    yeh

    Kilroy is a british one i dont like, i think trish is good tho, she used to be a drug addict or used to live with one or something, she actually seems to help people.
     
  5. DanGouge

    DanGouge

    May 25, 2000
    Canada!
    My solution: turn off the tv. If someone talks about them, say, "I don't watch that, I don't know who you mean."
     
  6. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    I find them to be good sources of other viewpoints, NOT advice.

    I get frustrated because they present their viewpoints as fact/truth. So many mindless people, like Mark referred to, don't realize this. They figure if _____ said it, that is the way to do it.

    -Mike
     
  7. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Guess I just have a different POV. I've seen both shows and have yet to see anyone tell anyone else this is what you "must" do. More like if what you've been doing isn't working, you can try this. I also haven't seen them representing their viewpoints as fact. They're opinions. Some people agree with them.

    Or do we think some people don't really need help?

    I guess I can't sign onto the blanket dismissal as others have.

    :meh:
     
  8. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Unfortuantely the kind of help they provide often only treats the symptoms rather than causes of the problem (how can it when those they are trying to help arn't there to truely present their problems).

    This kind of blanket band aid solution is often not appropriate for many situations and, as I said earlier, blindly following these "solutions" is often not appropriate.

    That said, anyone is free to watch and follow whomever they want. The shows do offer advice, is it appropriate and adapted to the needs of its audience? Who knows.
     
  9. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    I agree with you Mark. I also think the shows sometimes give viewers false expectations. Like maybe their marriage/family/sex/life problems can be solved with just an hour of _________'s time.

    They certainly provide people with tools, and valuable advice, which is what it should be viewed as. I actually like Dr. Phils no non-sense approach to problems.

    -Mike
     
  10. BaByBlUeBaSs05

    BaByBlUeBaSs05 Guest

    Jan 13, 2004
    Cali-USA

    I aggree with this person here,heh.
     
  11. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    How about his obvious pandering to women? (Well, at least he's smart enough to know how he gets paid, but still - hardly unbiased.)
     
  12. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    What I'm reading makes me wonder if anyone here has actually watched his (Dr. Phil's) show? Maybe this has just been a condemnation of the genre in general and he got thrown in with the rest. He's the most popular right now so I'd think he'd have to at least be taken into consideration.

    I've seen it several times and what I'm reading here doesn't reflect what I've seen, rather what people "think" happens on the show.

    Pandering to women? How? I've seen several women come on, bitching about their spouse, kids, job, life, etc. and he let's them have it, pointing out that they're a big part, if not all of the problem. This is hardly rare on the show.

    As far as false expectations, how can anyone blame a show for a viewer's lack of intelligence? I've yet to see Dr. Phil say that a problem can be fixed in an hour or set any expectation like that. I've seen him chastise people for making excuses for why they "can't" do things, berate parents who come on complaining about their "out-of-control" kids, etc. It's basically a calling a spade a spade thing and I'm not sure what the problem is with that.

    BTW even though it's a one hour format, why assume that's all the time that's spent on a problem or that there's no follow-up?

    "Unfortuantely the kind of help they provide often only treats the symptoms rather than causes of the problem (how can it when those they are trying to help arn't there to truely present their problems)".

    What "symptoms rather than causes"? Getting to the cause of the problem is exactly what the show is geared to. He even tells people they're focused on the symptom instead of the problem all the time.

    The format of the show is that he deals with specific people on the show and their specific problems. I've seen no claim that his advice is a blanket remedy for all viewers in similar situations.

    So what have you guys been watching? Granted, Letterman does some funny out of context snippets from Dr. Phil's show but that has little to do with the actual content.


    BTW what are the reasons you mentioned earlier, Eric?
     
  13. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Brad, I'll speak to the comment I made.

    I'd seen him several times on Oprah's show. I do like his no-nonsense attitude, but several times I've seen him in something similar to the following situation (one time it was exactly like this):

    Wife: My husband doesn't want to have sex with me.

    Husband: You gained 150 lbs since we got married (two years ago). I love you, but physically, I'm not attracted.

    Note: this guy wasn't cheating, he just didn't want to have sex with her - can't blame him, if you as me

    Phil: That's horrible! She's your wife, you're supposed to love her, no matter what!

    Husband: I do love her, I just don't find her physically attractive, since she's twice the size she was when I married her!

    etc, etc, etc....




    I've seen several segments on Oprah's show (I've since decided not to watch that kind of TV anymore...) that were like this. Enough to realize that he caters to his female audience. (Not that that's not smart, they ARE the reason he's on the air. But he's not unbiased)
     
  14. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Like I said, it sounds like there's far more that you haven't seen than you have. It's not as biased as you seem to think IMO.

    It's the etc, etc, etc.... part of your post that I find interesting... what does it include?:D

    Did Dr. Phil not try to find out "why" the spouse had gained all the weight? Did he only berate the husband and say the situation was all his fault? Did he try to convince him that not being attractive to what he thought was an overweight spouse made him a bad husband? Did he merely suggest that the husband shut up and climb aboard?

    Just curious... if there truly was a bias we'd already know the answer to these and similar questions. Besides, with this alledged female bias, how would he mediate disputes between two or more females?;)

    :meh:
     
  15. Eric Cioe

    Eric Cioe

    Jun 4, 2001
    Missoula, MT
    Something about someone with an hour time slot each day on network television, microphone in hand, trying to solve America's problems bothers me.

    If the people really wanted help, they'd see a -real- doctor (real in the sense that they can spend considerable time working out the causes and not just the problem).

    I guess my problem isn't with the people themselves, but the fact that so many people hang on their every word. Dr Phil puts out a book on weight loss, it's #1 in the charts. Dr Phil has a special with people having marriage trouble, and everyone is convinced that they have at least some of the problems too.

    I'm just calling this as I see it, being the 16 year old son of a Ph.D who watches this show at least twice a week, and tries to tell me that maybe we're having communication problems, or that she's overweight and should buy Dr. Phil's book. Yes, the problem is the viewer, but why does the show have to be there at all?
     
  16. If you could make thousands of people follow your every word like sheep and have them pay you at the same time, wouldn't you? Also, what if some of the stuff these talk show people say actually works? I'm not saying that i think it does work, but apparently a lot of people believe that it does.
     
  17. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Yeah, I watch it with my wife. We both enjoy the show. He provides people with valuable tools to deal with their problems. I have not condemned Dr. Phil. My comments were directed to the genre, radio or TV.

    "why assume that's all the time that's spent on a problem or that there's no follow-up?"

    I made no assumption of such. The "mindless" viewers I referred to earlier are the ones who don't take that into consideration. I don't blame the shows for this. Blame rests with the viewer/listener. Sometimes after an episode my wife and I will comment to each other that there is probably some wife/husband sitting at home thinking that when their mate gets home they are going to solve their problem after watching ______ today. "Honey, on _____ today they had a couple with the same problem as us. _____ told them to do this, so we are going to also". While the advice may have been valid, a mindless viewer may have the false expectation that their mate will respond the same way. "It worked on _____ today, so it will work for me."

    -Mike
     
  18. Marlat

    Marlat

    Sep 17, 2002
    London UK
    Brad,

    My comments were not directed act Dr Phil specifically (I have seen his show, but we don't have it in Australia). However, the symptons rather than the causes problem is true of the genre when applied to the viewers rather than the participants.

    Whilst the participants may receive a taylored solution - many of the target viewing market of these shows will try and apply this advice to their lives as if it were tailored for them. Its like giving someone a copy of DSM IV and saying "here you go, this will tell you whats wrong with you". Its not that simple.

    Another example - I can tell you all about pensions law in Australia, but unless I know what your specific situation is, the advice I give is unlikely to be well suited to your issues.

    As I said, my problem with the show is not with the show itself, but with the viewers and the acceptance of what a lot of these daytime idols say as being (for want of a better word) gospel.
     
  19. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    I'm with Brad.

    As a psychology student, I'm a fan of Dr. Phil's. I also know many professionals in the field of psychiatry or psychology that are very complimentary of his work.

    I also know as a fact that Dr. Phil does quite a bit of follow up work.
     
  20. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Yeah, that is cool. Some of the best Dr. Phil episodes are the follow-up's. Surely he does much more than what we see on TV.

    -Mike