The Ridiculous Process to adopt a Rescue Dog

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by BurnOut, Mar 28, 2017.

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  1. BurnOut

    BurnOut It's The Billy Baloney Show In Memoriam

    Feb 1, 2015
    The Natti
    I'm a dog person. I've been around dogs my whole life. I love my dogs and they live a healthy, happy life in my care. I particularly like the Australian Cattle Dogs (blue heelers). My current one is the sweetest, fun loving, forever puppy, even at 6 years old. I've had 4 and I am very good at working with the breed. They can be a handful and not for everyone. They are super smart and high energy.
    We recently lost a old dog, passing after a long life. Broke our hearts like they all end up doing eventually. So we have room for a new pack member. I could just go get a puppy no problem. I'd much rather rescue a in need cattle dog, and there's plenty out there.
    Here is the problem, the application, investigation, background check, is ridiculous over the top. I could buy a house easier than rescue a dog. I understand they want the best for the dogs. But they aren't doing them any favors making it so difficult. Come meet my animals and you'll see they have a better life than a lot of people.
    I rescued a Chorkie once. I'm pretty sure he was a former lab animal. His transformation was incredible. He went from a scared little mess, that chewed off any hair he could reach. To a happy, loyal, companion that manages all dog activities.
    When it's easier to just get a puppy then rescue a dog in need, they're not helping. They are just adding to the problem. Thanks for listening
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2017
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  2. Gorn

    Gorn

    Dec 15, 2011
    Queens, NY
    I don't know much about the process and I believe you when you say you take good care of your dogs. But wouldn't anyone trying to get a dog from these people say the same thing? They need to verify that right? They can't just take someone's word for it.
     
  3. Suck it up and jump through their hoops once, get a reference to show the next shelter next time the pack is short.
     
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  4. BurnOut

    BurnOut It's The Billy Baloney Show In Memoriam

    Feb 1, 2015
    The Natti
    I said that I understand they want them to go to good homes. But their process is just over the top.
     
  5. Gorn

    Gorn

    Dec 15, 2011
    Queens, NY
    What's the process? Which steps should they omit? I'm curious. I don't know how it works.
     
  6. beaglesandbass

    beaglesandbass Think first, then post? Staff Member Supporting Member

    Aug 14, 2001
    Philly Suburbs
    If I remember correctly the process in NJ was simple. Filled out the application, answered a questionnaire, listed what vet we'd use, and then in a day or two we got to take home our pup.
     
  7. RoadRanger

    RoadRanger Supporting Member

    Feb 18, 2004
    NE CT
    Yep, especially the "breed specific" rescues end up with tons of dogs they can't place because they are wackos. Keep looking, support the shelters that aren't run by crazy people. Got my last dog free from a pitbull rescue as a pup, she had to be put down last month at almost 14 years old :( - nicest dog ever :) .
     
  8. murphy

    murphy Supporting Member

    May 5, 2004
    Canada
    Also...there are tons of people who have dogs...that really shouldn't...children too

    So I understand why they use this oppertunity to ensure a suitable and appropriate home

    You sound exceptional....but many aren't

    I wish there were some extremely high standard requirements for dog, cat and children production
     
  9. Kahrmine

    Kahrmine

    May 25, 2013
    This happens in regions that are overwhelmed by peta types, if you know what I mean. Down south it's not as difficult.

    The people and organizations that insist on jumping through so many hoops actually end up contributing to the unecessary death of many more dogs because their process bottle-necks doggie distribution.

    If they can have 4 dogs at one time, but hold on to all of those dogs for an inordinate amount of time, all the potential puppies that could have come into their homes end up euthenized.

    It's the sad truth about dog and cat rescue. Overwhelmingly, they are put down because their processes to adopt are ridiculous.
     
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  10. Gravedigger Dav

    Gravedigger Dav Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2014
    Springtown, Texas
    I've been through the process a few times and I can agree it can seem over the top sometimes.
    The only issue I ever had was once I was adopting a black cat in early October. The scrutiny got more intense than usual. I had them call my vet who vouched for me. I got to know some of the people there and found out that people will try to get a black cat for torture and sacrifice, particularly close to Halloween.
     
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  11. friskinator

    friskinator Supporting Member

    Apr 5, 2007
    Georgia
    Black cats are also more difficult to adopt due to superstition. Crazy that's still a thing in 2017, but it's true. That's why we adopted one, and I can confirm he's brought us nothing but happiness and good luck.
     
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  12. RED J

    RED J Lol

    Jan 23, 2000
    @ BurnOut I recently had to put down my old friend of 14 years, and wanted a companion dog for my remaining one.

    I went on pet finder, and noted the same thing you did. Not for me either.
    In the final analysis, I am one person who could adopt one dog.

    I came across a family who had two litters of stray pups they were trying to place.One of those pups, a yellow Lab mix, came straight up and chose me.

    The pup has turned out to be a perfect fit. I'm having her spayed and innoculated and all that stuff by the vet.

    Either way, I was one person who was able to adopt one dog, responsibly. No hoops, no red tape , or fees. For those who choose to go that route, the end result is what the whole thing is about. Sadly, there are just too many strays.
     
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  13. MonetBass

    MonetBass ♪ Just listen ♫ Supporting Member

    Sep 15, 2006
    Tulsa
    I'm sure you can thank Michael Vick for all of that. :D But we adopted a rescue dog six years ago, and although the process was a bit involved, it was well worth it. Odie is a wonderful dog.
    FG9yuis.jpg
     
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  14. viribus

    viribus Gold Supporting Member

    Jan 1, 2011
    Pacific Northwest
    I never actually learned to play very well
    Thankfully they err on the side of caution. There are a lot of sickos and numbskulls who shouldn't be able to easily adopt pets.
     
  15. mpdd

    mpdd neoconceptualist

    Mar 24, 2010
    LA
    i realize that these places don't have a lot of money and not the best organization, however
    even after all the bs with the appointments, dog previews, and interviews, the freakin rescue people brought the wrong dog for the home visit
     
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  16. viribus

    viribus Gold Supporting Member

    Jan 1, 2011
    Pacific Northwest
    I never actually learned to play very well
    When I adopted my cat last week I had to fill out a lengthy application. Many of the questions are there to force the applicant to think about things like the cost of food and veterinary care, what you'll do with the animal when away from home or can no longer care for it, etc.

    The process is the way it is because poor adoption outcomes in the past have made it necessary.
     
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  17. Fully agree. My wife and I had to fill out many forms when we rescued our current dog. Yes it is a pain, but worth it.

    spoiled dog.jpg
     
  18. Steve

    Steve

    Aug 10, 2001
    I feel your pain brother. I've been in the market for a good used basset hound for a long time.
    The regional basset rescue seems to be very active. The are centered about 75 miles away. I tried jumping through their hoops a couple times. They are all volunteer so they are weeks getting back to you slow. The application is utterly ridiculous, complete with essay questions: "Why do you want a dog?", "Tell us about your most extra-specialist childhood memory about your dog.." and a bunch of other stuff in the interest in "seeing that you get matched with the best dog for your life style"...and THEN the home inspection to pass judgement?

    I'm sorry. I get all that good intention but, I'll pick out my own damn dog thank you very much
     
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  19. Just because you jump through all the hoops doesn't mean you'll end up with a nice animal.

    We had two cats from rescue that were absolute whackos..one escaped never to be seen again and we returned the other one.

    My ex had a dog that was nuts too.
     
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  20. pcake

    pcake Supporting Member

    Sep 20, 2011
    Los Angeleez
    i'm all for adding some hoops. i've seen too many abused animals whose owners passed the regular checks. many, many :(

    our next door neighbor years ago had an untrained pitbull that they kept tied in a corner of their yard for years with no way to exercise, nothing to smell, nothing to do. animal control failed to do anything about it when we called, probably because those people had their lies in a row, but i can't imagine why they wanted this poor dog in the first place. they never interacted with her short of putting out food and water once a day and once having her bred. she couldn't even scare off bad guys as she was stuck in the yard.

    there are rescues here that include a home visit in advance and one after adoption, and i'm for that.

    we had a local stray cat, the sweetest can i've ever known, who some family just dumped when they moved. three groups of us fed and watered him, and one got him vet checked. he was adopted by a family first who didn't treat him well, and finally let him escape, and when my neighbor found him, he was terrified and skinny. we all fed him back up, loved him and this time he scored a great home. he's now well fed, always indoors and petted all the time. my neighbor has visited several times, and mr. c's owner sends pics and updates. we would have loved to take him, but we have an elderly cat with health issues.
     
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