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The search for heavy, extra long scale strings.

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Beast, Aug 15, 2007.


  1. Alright, I've been looking at some Ken Smith Metal masters for my 5 stringer. Those are gauges .050 .070 .085 .110 .145T. However, I'm worried they won't fit my 35 1/4 scale Carvin. Does anybody know where I could find strings with that amount of tension, and that length?

    Also, will increasing the tension to that much damage my neck or bridge or anything? I heard with that much bigger strings, I will have to get my nut filed, is there anything else that needs to be done?

    Thanks!
     
  2. bump?
     
  3. mccartneyman

    mccartneyman

    Dec 22, 2006
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Managing Editor, Bass Guitars Editor, MusicGearReview.com
    I'd asking Ken Smith if they'll fit. You need to measure the length of the strings that came on the Carvin and compare. Bigger diameter doesn't always mean higher tension. As for diameter and your nut, it's a crapshoot. I went with a much beefier B on my Lakland 55-94 without a problem.
     
  4. knuckle_head

    knuckle_head Commercial User

    Jul 30, 2002
    Seattle
    Owner; Knuckle Guitar Works & Circle K Strings
    Ken Smiths are the same as several other brands - you want to find a string with a 38" wind and it is fairly common. These strings are used on 36" and 35" through body basses by and large.

    At first glance that is a pretty specialized set - La Bella has a .140 but that is as thick as they go. They do have a 4 string set that nearly matches the higher 4. Check out Just Strings. D'Addario might be a decent option as well as they have a wide variety of gauges as singles.

    The tension on your neck will be only minimally higher and the bass ought to be able to take it - you will have to adjust the truss rod, and set your intonation back a bit.
     

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