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The "Very First" 5 String Bass???

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by jokerjkny, Jun 11, 2002.


  1. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny

    Jan 19, 2002
    NY / NJ / PA
    While doing research for nice 5 stringers, i came across this guy... according to Huber/Breese Music Studios that's selling it, its a 1966 Fender Bass-5. is this thing for reals???

    [​IMG]
     
  2. the bass is real, i don't know if it was the first 5 or not though...
     
  3. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    It is for real, but IIRC it was tuned differently then todays 5 strings.
     
  4. IIRC, that bass has a high C instead of a low B and has less frets as a result of the added range from the higher string.

    -Chris
     
  5. BassFelt

    BassFelt

    Mar 26, 2002
    I've owned one of those. Not a useful instrument to todays standards. It sounds pretty lame. The range is the same as a 4 string - what you gain in the extra string you loose in the reduced number of frets.

    For collectors only.
     
  6. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
    I think BassPalace has a 1930's Kay 5-string DB. Does that count?
     
  7. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Pretty accurate. Pictures don't do it justice. In real life these things look pretty goofy... the body is abnormally long, the neck is 15 frets. The sound is definitely not it's strong suit;). It's collectable because it's old, kind of rare and a Fender.

    There's a modified one at a local store, has a PJ setup and refin.

    How much are they asking for this "gem"?
     
  8. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk

    Apr 14, 2001
    Pennsylvania
  9. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    In the last issue of Double Bassist magazine there are pictures of a 1767 bass that was made as a 5-string and was played by the virtuoso Simandl.

    The article say that most Viennese double basses in the 18th century were 5-strings !! :D
     
  10. Showdown

    Showdown Supporting Member

    Jan 21, 2002
    Honolulu, Hawaii
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    But there were 5-string basses in the 18th Century!! And as I SAID - most Viennese made basses were 5 strings! Keep up! ;)
     
  12. You have not lived until you have bowed the low string on a 5 string DB.

    Extreme brown note.
     
  13. ldiezman

    ldiezman

    Jul 11, 2001
    Nashville
    Couldn't be the first 5-string bass ever made... the first 5-string basses were double basses...:eek:
     
  14. neptoon

    neptoon

    Jul 25, 2000
    summerville, sc
    they made 6 string db's too...i'm not sure they were called db's, though.
     
  15. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Here's an excerpt from the "New Grove Dictionary of Music" :

    "During the early 17th century the five-string bass was most commonly used in Austria and Germany. Leopold Mozart referred in the 1787 edition of his Violinschule to having heard concertos, trios and solos played with great beauty on instruments of this kind. The earliest known playing instructions, by Johann Jacob Prinner (Musicalischer Schlissl, 1677, autograph US-Wc) are for an instrument tuned F'-A'-D-F#-B. Much more usual, however, is the tuning F'-A'-D-F#-A cited in 1790 by Albrechtsberger, for a violone or contrabass with thick strings and frets tied at every semitone round the fingerboard. Michel Corrette's 1773 Méthode throws much light on the bass techniques and tunings in use during the 18th and early 19th centuries when the bass was enjoying some popularity as a solo instrument. Many of the virtuoso pieces from the Viennese school of that period and later abound with passages of double stopping and, in view of the tunings required, were thought by early 20th-century authorities not to have been written for the bass at all. "


    So - fretted, five string double basses were common things in the 1700s!!
     
  16. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Here's a pic :

    [​IMG]
     
  17. neptoon

    neptoon

    Jul 25, 2000
    summerville, sc
    quick! get this over to the DB forum...someone accidentally asked for a tab in the db forums. hee hee there may be a war over there...