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Thelonious Monk?

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by Bassline1414, Aug 4, 2001.


  1. My jazz collection is fairly limited, and the only Monk album I have is "Straight, No Chaser", which I thought was a really cool album. One of my friends let me borrow the Coltrane collaboration, too, and I thought that was also very good. Are there any other Monk albums that you guys could recommend? Thanks.
     
  2. brewer9

    brewer9

    Jul 5, 2000
    I know everyone's gonna crap all over me for this, but I cant help myself. Every time I see his name. I think of "Thelonious Ranger."
     
  3. You can goto www.allmusic.com and do a seaerch on TM, lots of good info there. My favorites are probally "Trios" and "Brilliant Corners"
     
  4. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    Columbia Records will very soon release (or maybe already has) a reissue called "Thelonius Monk: The Columbia Years, 1962 to 968" in honor of what would have been Monk's 75th birthday.

    A reviewer in my local newspaer has called it a "beautifully packaged 3-CD retrospective consisting of highlights and unissued outtakes from eight Columbia studio albums plus a number of live sessions."

    In addition two more new releases of variations of Monk's best known work are "Monk Live at The Jazz Workshop--Complete" and "Monk in Tokyo."

    I haven't heard any of these myself, but the reviewer, Craig Havighurst, speaks very highly of each, but especailly the first which he rates four stars, something he seldom awards any recordings at all.

    Havighurst is a big Monk fan and ends his commentary about these new offerings by saying. "No jazz artist I can think of is so prone to make a rapid and triumphant journey from a listener's head to his or her heart." Whew! I guess that says it all.
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    My Penguin Guide to Jazz on CD, gives its highest possible rating (a coronet) to "The Complete Blue Note Recordings" which is a 4CD boxed set, although this is quite expensive. So they say that for anyone who can't afford that set to go for "The Best of Thelonius Monk : The Blue Note Years" which includes selections from the boxed set. I have the latter which was quite cheap (single CD)and is excellent -all the classic tunes, that have since become standards.
     
  6. A Rock

    A Rock

    Mar 18, 2001
    New Haven, CT
    did u try cdnow.com?
     
  7. Well, I cannot add to the recommended recordings which have been mentioned elsewhere in this thread, but for something slightly different, you might take a listen to Jessica Williams - "In The Key Of Monk" is her tribute to Thelonius Monk, and I think her playing is absolutely incredible. I first heard her playing "Cheek to Cheek" (from her "In The Pocket" CD) and thought it was TM as I'd never heard of Jessica Williams before. Just FYI...

    - Wil
     
  8. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Also consider "Thelonious Monk Plays Duke Ellington." Fascinating meeting of two of the premier musical minds of the 20th century (IMO).
     
  9. whiteshadow

    whiteshadow

    Jul 3, 2001
    Ohio
    This is sorta off tipic, but I played TM in a play in 6th grade about jazz. It was a pretty weird play but I had this awesome monolouge about jazz and what it means and whatnot. Back to the topic...
     
  10. Thanks for the input, guys. Speaking of Monk, does anyone have the tribute album that Andy Summers put out? I really like Andy Summers in the Police, and I was a little curious about this one.
     
  11. Doesn't that book simply rule? I can sit there reading it, lusting for album after album, for hours on end.

    FWIW, I'd recommend Brilliant Corners, and for a really basic overview the reissue of 1962's The Best of Thelonious Monk (my dad has the original LP). On Brilliant Corners, it's an interesting and somewhat sad exercise to contrast the rather mundane playing of the usually fabbo Oscar Pettiford--who was quite heroin-addled at the time--and the brilliance of Paul Chambers' performance on "Bemsha Swing."