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Thinking about buying a '69 fender...

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by mactac, Mar 15, 2008.


  1. it's year I was born, so I want one!

    other than the obvious differences between a p & a j, which one would be a better buy for a 1969?
     
  2. Andrew Jones

    Andrew Jones Banned

    Feb 28, 2001
    Northampton Mass

    What are the obvious differences to you?


    Aj
     
  3. well, i've owned both newer p's & j's, so
    sound, neck, feel, weight, tone shaping, etc.

    I wanted to know which of the 2 in a 1969 is a better buy
     
  4. Andrew Jones

    Andrew Jones Banned

    Feb 28, 2001
    Northampton Mass
    The J going to be allot more money.


    Aj
     
  5. The BurgerMeister

    The BurgerMeister musician.

    Apr 13, 2006
    Big Bear, CA
    go with your gut.

    just a warning, though... your gut will probably want a J. :smug:
     
  6. jazz bass
     
  7. I really like the late 60's -early '70's maple neck p's. They had a solidity that I just can't explain. At the same time, many loved the maple jazz necks from the same period; but from my memory they seemed to have an awful lot of problems(cracked fingerboards, wharping,etc.) This may be why Jazzes from the period that survived are now worth more. But if it were me I'd find a maple neck P.
     
  8. I agree with you on both counts bassmanrocke. I like the late 60's -early '70's maple neck p's, been looking for one with a C width. I own a 68 RW fingerboard jazz and have had trouble with the block inlays lifting or falling out. There was a 68 jazz neck sold on evilbay from a repair shop here locally. One inlay had fallen out as well along with fingerboard cracks. But they aren't all like that.
     
  9. markjazzbassist

    markjazzbassist Supporting Member

    Apr 19, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    i love my 69 Jazz. Great neck, tone, weight, looks, and playability. Go for it, you won't be disappointed:)
     
  10. hmmm.. sounds like the jazz is the one :)

    what's a reasonable price to pay for an all-original in good shape?
     
  11. oh, and how much do they vary is tone? ie can I buy one without seeing it first?
     
  12. markjazzbassist

    markjazzbassist Supporting Member

    Apr 19, 2005
    Cleveland, OH
    depends on what you're looking for. if you're going all original, plan to spend $4000-9000 (depending on finish, matching headstock, etc.).

    a refinish cuts the value in half (which is what i got) so thats something good to look for if you're not made out of money
     
  13. mikeswals

    mikeswals Supporting Member

    Nov 18, 2002
    Seattle / Tacoma
    Well true period correct maple boards started for the 1970 model year. Some prototype maple boards were made in late '69 on J's (but not on P's), but for the most part they didn't exist as an option in the late 60's.
     
  14. mikeswals

    mikeswals Supporting Member

    Nov 18, 2002
    Seattle / Tacoma
    I really wouldn't recommend buying one without trying it. Anything could happen in 39yrs, and I would want to do an in-hand inspection for any damamge, repairs, and especially originality of all the parts considering what they fetch nowadays. Pretty much 4k and up for standard colors, and local dealer gets 7-9k for matching headstock colored ones all the time. *Original finishes of course. J's get anywhere from 500 a 1k more than the same year P.

    I love my '69, the neck is the most comfy feeling neck ever. It's in excellent+ shape and is 100% original down to every last screw. Got it 5yrs ago, but I most definitely wouldn't be able to afford to buy it at todays prices.

    DSC00010.
     
  15. wow, what a clean 69 Jazz Bass, u is lucky!
     

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