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This awesome! (Melodyne)

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by i_got_a_mohawk, Mar 12, 2008.


  1. Jordan

    Jordan

    Feb 22, 2004

    It is very cool. I got to use it once in a studio. I recorded an 3 minutes upright bass track that was almost perfect except for this one pitchy note. Instead of having to mess with punches, the engineer just dragged the out note back into pitch with Melodyne. The end result was perfect!

    Jordan
     
  2. smeet

    smeet Gold Supporting Member

    Nov 27, 2006
    Woodland Hills, CA
    This is incredible!!! It doesn't even seem possible... When this technology advances a few more steps, you might be able to edit individual instruments within a stereo band performance...

    You could retune an out-of-tune recorded guitar even if it was playing chords!

    Melodyne was always great, but the DNA feature puts it way over the top. I love using these kinds of tools in ways in which they were not intended to be used. I can imagine the sound-mangling you could do with this feature...
     
  3. envika

    envika

    Nov 27, 2007
    Bronx, NY
    I took a ProTools class with a master NYC session guitarist (name withheld). He made me watch this whole video. While I sat there speechless, he said to me: "Sure, this works perfectly with the recordings on the video, but I'm not so sure that it will work as well with a trashy distorted Les Paul as it will with that nice, clean, perfectly recorded classical guitar. That being said, I'll throw down the money for it if it's even half as good as they say it is." I'm a little scared, but it sure is a huge stride not only in audio but in science as well.
     
  4. pbass2

    pbass2

    Jan 25, 2007
    Los Angeles
    Melodyne is the bee's knees. I use it all the time, not just for fixing things from pitchy vocals to my guitarron (when I whip that out after not having played it in ages:) to building vocal harmonies. Another KILLER use for it is, if you use sample libraries--for example, I use live horn sample libraries of riffs and phrases a lot---always better sounding than trying to "play" horns on the keyboard. With Melodyne, all those riffs and phrases can have a whole new life--I can build all new melodies with them, change vibratos, etc. etc. I dunno what I'd do without it these days frankly. It's pretty sick what it can do.
     
  5. lm183902

    lm183902

    Aug 19, 2007
    Denver, CO
    I have a feeling that voice over guy doesn't have much audio experience other than recording vocals. I laughed over and over every time I heard him say "meedee"
     
  6. Josh Ryan

    Josh Ryan - that dog won't hunt, Monsignor. Supporting Member

    Mar 24, 2001
    Wow. That is unreal, I must see it for myself though. It seems to cool to be reality.
     
  7. Taylor Livingston

    Taylor Livingston Supporting Member Commercial User

    Dec 25, 2002
    Oregon, US
    Owner, Iron Ether Electronics
    I saw this when it was first announced, and it is the only time I have been really considering buying expensive software. The possibilities of DNA are just mind-boggling. The creative uses of recording your own stuff and then warping it in ways never before possible is really exciting.

    Another interesting thing is that if you really like the sound of something on a record, you can now lift it and repurpose it in your own music. In certain cases, this would be unethical and illegal, but that aside, just imagine using the sound of a great performer playing a great instrument, recorded beautifully, and using that to write your own composition. Since we can see that classical guitar works well, imagine for example you want to record a classical guitar piece, but all you have is a cheapo guitar and awful mics and preamps. Using this technology, you could perhaps take the sound of Andres Segovia playing his Hermann Hauser guitar, recorded with world-class mics and preamps, and completely rearrange it into your own composition. Again, there are ethical and legal considerations, but for non-commercial music, this could be limitless fun.
     

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