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This Bass is amazing but....

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by BGOLDBASS, Aug 15, 2007.


  1. BGOLDBASS

    BGOLDBASS

    Jul 31, 2007
    glen head,NY
    i just brought back my eb mm sr4 i was unhappy with the bass in general , mostly the spacing of the strings and the sterile tone....anyways (mm lovers, dont hate me) , i picked up a 60th anniversary fender jbass ....and it plays awesome.....

    my "but" is this... when my hands are not touching the strings , i get a hi pitched buzzing noise, and when i put my hands on the string the noise goes away ....also the 3 knobs at the bottom the one closest to the input jack "the treble knob" if i have this completly turned off there is no noise... is one of the tone pots busted , do i have a faulty cable, or is the the "noise" im hearing about from non noiseless single coils? whatever it is i need it gone , what do i do ?
     
  2. XsorrowfoxX

    XsorrowfoxX

    Apr 12, 2007
    Miami
    the bass might not be grounded properly.

    when your hand touches the strings, it creates a direct line to the ground or something.

    check under the bridge, and the wire should be touching the metal of the bridge.
     
  3. that's a very common thing on jazz basses. They never really stop humming.
     
  4. BGOLDBASS

    BGOLDBASS

    Jul 31, 2007
    glen head,NY
    i understand that , but this hum pops in and out as my finger touches the string ...sounds like a grounding issue to me but is anyone else experienceing this?
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Do you get that noise if both pickups are turned up full? If not, then it's just a characteristic of Jazz basses. If so, then check your ground, and also it wouldn't be a bad idea to line your pickguard, control cavity, and pickup cavity with shielding paint or aluminum tape.
     
  6. BGOLDBASS

    BGOLDBASS

    Jul 31, 2007
    glen head,NY
    it happens when both pickups are on if you turn of the bridge pickup all the way , it goes away
     
  7. Double Agent

    Double Agent Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2006
    Lakeland, FL
    Grounding issue. Try removing the bridge and making sure that the ground wire is making contact with it. It doesn't have to be soldered, it just has to be exposed and make contact with the bottom of the bridge. Bring it to a tech if you don't feel comfy doing this yourself. Best of luck!
     
  8. middy

    middy

    Mar 14, 2007
    Texas
    If the grounding wire wasn't contacting the bridge then there would be no difference whether he touched the strings or not....

    It's the standard 60 cycle hum through the single coil pickups. When you touch the strings you're grounding your body (which is the source of a lot of reflected electro-magnetic noise), so you get less hum.

    If you put the effort into properly shielding and grounding your instrument (which is almost never properly done in the factory), you'll get less noise. You could also try installing "noiseless" pickups.
     
  9. Double Agent

    Double Agent Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2006
    Lakeland, FL
    If it happens when BOTH p/u's are on full, then it is NOT standard 60-cycle hum, it is something else. It is either a bad ground, or bad wiring period. Almost, if not all, J pickups are hum-cancelling when they are both ON. Its only when one is soloed that you get 60-cycle hum.

    Also, if his ground wire weren't touching the bridge, wouldn't his body still ground the bass when he touches the strings???
     
  10. nastyn8c

    nastyn8c

    Feb 7, 2005
    Tampa, FL
    Try putting both full on to help with hum canceling. I had the same problem with my Fender RBV, but putting both pickups full on got rid of the noise.
     
  11. Dan1099

    Dan1099 Dumbing My Process Down

    Aug 7, 2004
    Michigan
    Sorry, but you are wrong. It is 60 cycle hum, being picked up by the electronics. Yes, the pickups are humcancelling, but the electronics cavity is NOT. If the electronics cavity isn't shielded, it will pick up 60 cycle hum. Touching the strings grounds your body, which essentially acts as a shield at that point. That's why it must be shielded properly.
     
  12. BGOLDBASS

    BGOLDBASS

    Jul 31, 2007
    glen head,NY
    me confused!
     
  13. Double Agent

    Double Agent Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2006
    Lakeland, FL
    Look at it this way...

    Loosen your strings and remove the bridge. If you see the ground wire is not contacting the metal underneath your bridge fix it real quick, reattach your bridge and tune up. If your bass is still making the noise, then you know that wasn't the source of the problem, and it won't even take 5 minutes to check it. Of course, if the ground wire is touching the bridge, then you know its something else, like poor shielding or bad wiring. It probably couldn't hurt to do some sheilding work anyways.
     
  14. kevinmoore73

    kevinmoore73 Supporting Member

    Jun 18, 2007
    Cleveland, OH
    You could also use a multimeter to check for continuity between the input jack and the bridge. If there's no continuity, the ground connection is bad. My vote is that you should shield your control cavity.
     
  15. ggunn

    ggunn

    Aug 30, 2006
    Austin, TX
    There's an easier way; just get a meter and check continuity between the strings and the nut that surrounds the output jack. I doubt that this is the problem, though; if the strings are isolated from the electronics, why would touching them do anything to the sound/noise level?
     
  16. Dan1099

    Dan1099 Dumbing My Process Down

    Aug 7, 2004
    Michigan
    If touching the strings makes the hum go away, it means he's making his body part of the shield. He's grounding his body. That means the bridge is grounded.
     
  17. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001

    Jun 17, 2004
    Ireland
    Maybe but it would do a very poor job of it. Going through your body which has a decent resistance plus your socks and your shoes and your carpet and flooring all adds up to make a terrible ground connection. Don't get me wrong you could still get electrocuted from mains power, but for grounding signal noise you are a pretty poor conductor.

    As was said when you touch strings you are grounding yourself much better than when your not. Your body can act as a large antenna (like when you tune a radio by adjusting the aerial and you walk away you lose the signal) you reflect a lot of radio interference and what not. When you ground yourself by touching the strings you become a large piece of shielding. Noise coming from you gets sent to ground via the strings and bridge and then doesn't interfere with the basses electronics .

    Just as an experiment, I took my cheapy jazz and solo'ed a pick up then walked over to my pc which gives off a bit of noise. Touching the grounded chasis of the pc had more or less the same effect as touching my strings in terms of noise reduction.
     
  18. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001

    Jun 17, 2004
    Ireland
    What puzzles me is that it's noisy when both pickups are on and not when the bridge pickup is soloed. Are you sure your not mixing up what you think is both pickups on and the bridge soloed?

    I would agree that shielding is the way to go.
     
  19. BGOLDBASS

    BGOLDBASS

    Jul 31, 2007
    glen head,NY

    three knobs on my bass , the closest to the input jack i thought was the bridge knob, when that is off completly there is no hum the second its on the hum appears(sounds like a noise pick up) but the second i touch the strings the hum stops , and vise versa....the middle knob is the neck pick up and the one furthest is the volume....correct? i think so ...when both pick ups are on the same problem occurs

    when just the neck is soloed there is no him or ground problem ....

    does this help ?
     
  20. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001

    Jun 17, 2004
    Ireland
    Hmmmm. I could be wrong but I think that the first knob closest to the jack is the tone pot. Usually the more treble the more noise your going to get.

    For the other two knobs...

    Then there are two possibilities either you have a volume pot for each pick up with the middle knob being volume for the bridge pickup and the knob closest to the neck is for the neck pickup.

    The other is if you have a blend pot (which will be the middle pot I think), which when centred will have both pickups on and as you move it to the the bridge will turn down the neck pickup and turn up the bridge pick up and vice versa. Then the third knob is overall volume.

    In the first instance the hum should quiet down when both knobs are fully on.

    In the second the instance the hum should quiet when the centre knobs is in the central position.

    Im not a jazz expert so someone correct me if Im wrong.

    If one of the above works at making the hum disappear your going to have to shield the electronics in the bass. There's some good tutorials here if you do a search or you could get a tech to do it.
     

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