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Thoughts on Hologram Concerts and Their Effect on Modern Music?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Bodeanly, Jun 12, 2019 at 6:15 AM.


  1. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    For the last 10 years, I have been the sole graphic designer for a small entertainment promotions company. We generally do shows for comedians (Tim Allen, Lewis Black, etc.) and smaller bands or those that can no longer fill arenas (REO, Cheap Trick, etc.). Lately, we've been doing quite a few hologram concerts and while I feel that technology has lessened the desire for people to see live rock music, I also feel that it has opened a door for people who never would have experienced it otherwise. The hologram concerts are backed by live bands comprised of hired musicians who tour with the "artist." The latest "tour" we've been tasked with is for both Buddy Holly and Roy Orbison.

    While I've seen enough episodes of Black Mirror to be fearful of the changing times, it also leaves me a little hopeful that live rock music will make a resurgence, perhaps bringing it back to what it once was. Perhaps.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    I think it’s weak.

    I’d sooner stay home, listen to the recordings and keep $100 in my pocket.
     
    Jeff Scott, rendevouz, MCF and 18 others like this.
  3. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    Man, I totally get that and if they weren't signing my paycheck, I probably wouldn't think twice about it. On the other hand, I'd love to take my kid to see Nirvana some day.
     
  4. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    This method won’t do that.

    R’n’r is about energy and spontaneity and passion.

    Touring a static performance doesn’t get halfway there...
     
    rollie 55, GregC, 4dog and 11 others like this.
  5. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    Sorry, no interest for me. We talk about bands using backing tracks, and the consensus seems to be that if it is for a needed background part, it can be acceptable. Here, it is for the primary track, both visually and sound-wise. I'd rather see a good tribute band (and little interest in that beyond it being a good cover band).

    I think this will hurt, not help, live music.
     
    MCF, 4dog, DJ Bebop and 5 others like this.
  6. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    I actually think it will flop so quickly it won’t have any measurable effect on live performances
     
    ICM, MCF, DJ Bebop and 4 others like this.
  7. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    No need to be sorry, dude. I’m just thinking out loud here. I’m not trying to sell tickets. :thumbsup:
     
    MCF, DJ Bebop, nbsipics and 2 others like this.
  8. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    So you’d turn down the chance to play bass in the backing band for Buddy Holly’s hologram?

    I’d also like to add that I thought the idea of kids paying concert prices to see a DJ would flop.
     
  9. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    What does it pay?

    Just because I don’t have faith in it’s longevity doesn’t mean I wouldn’t endorse the paycheck. Sometimes you have to make hay when the sun is shining
     
    DJ Bebop and dkelley like this.
  10. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    No different than any other cover band with a steady calendar of good shows, it's a gig. But I'd rather play in a good band with a singer who can cop his vocals well.
     
    DJ Bebop, LBS-bass and Bodeanly like this.
  11. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    That’s all I’m doing.
     
  12. charlie monroe

    charlie monroe Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 14, 2011
    Buffalo, NY
    I get that. I hope you don’t think I’m knocking YOU down. It’s the concept I’m not a fan of.
     
    Bodeanly likes this.
  13. Bodeanly

    Bodeanly Supporting Member

    Mar 20, 2015
    Chicago
    I’m not going to take it personally until I’m dead and you don’t show up to any of my hologram gigs.
     
    FilterFunk, garp, Avigdor and 41 others like this.
  14. bholder

    bholder Affable Sociopath Supporting Member

    Sep 2, 2001
    central NY state
    Received a gift from Sire* (see sig)
    Can I attend as a hologram? I mean, why let the small matter of Death stop my concert enjoyment? :woot:
     
  15. two fingers

    two fingers Opinionated blowhard. But not mad about it. Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 7, 2005
    Eastern NC USA
    While I think Nirvana would be a waste of a perfectly good hologram, I get the sentiment.

    Short version: I think it's great if the artist is dead. I would go see a Johnny Cash one in a minute. That would he fun.
     
    pcake, OldDog52, Bodeanly and 2 others like this.
  16. buldog5151bass

    buldog5151bass Kibble, milkbones, and P Basses. And redheads.

    Oct 22, 2003
    Connecticut
    Would you rather pay money to see a hologram concert, or a good tribute band?
     
  17. two fingers

    two fingers Opinionated blowhard. But not mad about it. Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 7, 2005
    Eastern NC USA
    I'm fine with either, honestly. I would get a kick out of "seeing Johnny Cash" himself as a hologram. A good tribute would be fun too if the guy really owns the character. Etta James would be fun.

    I like the new kid who sings for Queen. He's pretty awesome. But halfway through the show, a song with a Freddy hologram and his vocals would be fun.

    It would be great to see a stage production with Kennedy, MLK, Reagan, etc. speeches too. (I'm a big history buff.)

    "I have a dream." "Ask not what your country can do for you." "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall." That would be ridiculously cool to see in front of me in "3D".

    We're all grown. We know what we're paying for.
     
  18. I say okay if, all proceeds in someway help causes the artist was lost to or supported. Other than that to make profit from a deceased person and put the money in your own pocket, is just wrong imo.
     
  19. BassBrass

    BassBrass

    Jul 6, 2009
    Boston MA
    I thought this was about techno rave dance bands who play in front of a bluescreen upon which sets are projected so it the synth/track fiddler looks like he sitting in a spaceship or huge something-or-other. The point isn't the show anyway, it's the ravers.
    I wouldn't go through the effort of parking to see a hologram performance, but if I was walking along on a balmy night and it was playing in a alley I'd watch it for 5 minutes. Live Honk bands in an alley get a whole set stop & watch.
     
    Charlzm, Bodeanly and Jeff Elkins like this.
  20. knumbskull

    knumbskull

    Jul 28, 2007
    UK
    a few vague thoughts:

    - i don't have a problem with it, but wouldn't pay to see one myself.

    - you could look at it as a respectful tribute to the work of a much-missed artist... or a ruthless cash-in.

    - i think that given the general public's – and therefore the music industry's - love of heritage acts, it's not a surprising development at all.

    - a more interesting use of the technology was the band Gorillaz (really a solo project, but anyway), which used holograms to enable their animated band members to "play" live!
     
    DrayMiles, Pizza1988 and Bodeanly like this.

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