Three bands want me, HELP!!!

Discussion in 'Band Management [BG]' started by chris4001asat, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. chris4001asat


    Dec 16, 2002
    Toledo, Ohio
    Warehouse Manager : Reverend Guitars
    My Current band, I've been with them 3 years. We had some REALLY prime gigs. But the leader/ lead singer, well, he's arrogant, obnoxious, and is a really BAD singer. But he is a realy good frontman at getting the crowd involved. Everybody but me quit the band in July. I stuck it out, we got new members. But now, all the prima gigs we had, we lost because nobody can stand the singer....He's THAT bad. We do have some good summer festivals contracted for this summer, but that's it. He keeps saying we'll get gigs, don't worry. He thinks we lost the gigs because we had to play some shows with a not yet ready band. I know for a fact that it's because of him.
    I've been jamming with the old keyboardist and drummer since December. It's sounds really good, but I have my doubts. I've known the drummer for 20 years, and I know that he's more talk than action.
    The third band is a blues band I just auditioned for Saturday. They're a few years older than me. Really easy going, real good players. I come from a more pop/rock background, but it was fun jamming with them.
    I think I could juggle two bands, but not three. Should I quit the first band now, or hold out till the summer gigs? Should I take a chance on a genre I'm not all that familar with?
  2. Sounds like you need to get your priorities in line. What's more important to you? For example, do you want to play gigs, or do you want to play music you like?

    You didn't mention how serious the blues band is. Is it a serious band that is going to be gigging regularly and making money, or is it just a group of guys that get together and jam once in a while? Does the music really interest you, or is it just a novelty right now because it's different than what you're used to?

    If you like the sound of the second group, what would hold you back from playing with them? You said one guy isn't dedicated...well, are there ways to work around that? Is he the key guy in the band, while someone else handles bookings and stuff?

    As far as your first group, has anybody actually spoken to the singer about his vocal issues? It's amazing how some of these things can work out when people actually confront the problem instead of talking about it behind the person's back, and leaving when things don't magically get better, you know? You said this band at least has some shows booked this summer. At least that is a start to build on. Most small local bands would be grateful to have bookings that far ahead, so they can prepare and get some fill-in gigs in the meantime.
  3. chris4001asat


    Dec 16, 2002
    Toledo, Ohio
    Warehouse Manager : Reverend Guitars
    The blues band, gig wise, is exactly what I'm looking for. 1-2 weekends a month, with a once a week rehearsal. I;mnot sure if it's a novelty or not.
    The second band, the leader and drummer( who've I've known for 20 years) is....a great salesman. He can tell you what you want to hear, but rarely follows through with it. My gut tells me it'll be a year of rehearsal, followed by nothing.
    As far as the singer in the first band, He'll be the first to admit he can't sing. But he refuses to take lessons because they'll just tell him to " stop drinking and smoking". Plus he says his "show" makes up for any vocal issues. We had a really impressive first year and a half gig wise. But we lost the majority of them.
  4. cheezewiz


    Mar 27, 2002
  5. Well, sounds like the blues band is right up your alley. I'd join that, and follow your gut on the second band. I think we've all had experiences like that...someone says how great everything is going to be, you work and work and work, and then nothing ever happens.

    As for the first band, it sounds like your singer has some issues. Drinking heavily, but more importantly, smoking, is seriously bad for any vocalist. I think you need to sit down in a non-confrontational way, and remind him how many gigs you guys used to have, and how things have really slacked off now. Explain that he needs to improve himself for the good of the band. If he refuses, it may be time to cut him loose and look for a new vocalist. A band is only as good as its weakest link.