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Three finger or four

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by Chef, Jun 15, 2004.


  1. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    So, I'm bored waiting for my newly ordered db to arrive. I went out and bought some method books to read whilst waiting. This has probably already been much discussed, so sorry if this is repeat material...
    Are most of you guys simandl "three finger (1,2, 3&4)" people, or franke "four finger people?"
    I've always used all four on slab, and centered my fingering around number two, shifting up and down, or string to string as needed. If four finger technique is possible, with a little "thumb roll" as franke suggest, I guess that would be most similar to what I'm used to...

    If it matters, I'll be playing mostly r&b, and 'grassin'...
     
  2. You will probably find it much easier to play in tune using three fingers--especially in the first few positions.
     
  3. I'd definately go with the simandl method. Your fingers are all just in the right place, plus you can get more of a sound (in my opinion) using both 3&4 rather than just one or the other. As long as you learn how to shift well I dont see any advantage of using all four fingers.

    I've actually liked the 1, 2, 3&4 technique so much that I use it when playing electric now, and in the lower parts of the bass, I actually think it is more comfertable and efficient, if you use the proper shifting techniques and whatnot.
     
  4. Josh McNutt

    Josh McNutt Guest

    Mar 10, 2003
    Denton, Texas (UNT)
    I use both. I usually use 124 when I'm in the lower positions, but I'll throw in a 3 occasionally. I use Rabbath with some twists, and I use all four above the D on the G string pretty often.
     
  5. 1,2, 3&4....but wish i'd done the Rabbath thing.
     
  6. Chef -- I use Simandl's three-finger method. However, I occasionally throw in my third finger in rare situations, mainly when I'm playing an interval of a perfect fourth from one string to the next (say, playing C on the A string, then playing F on the D string). For this interval I will sometimes use a second finger-third finger sequence, or sometimes a third finger-fourth finger sequence. But that's the rare exception. Having played guitar for most of my life, I was used to using all four fingers, and I thought that a three-finger method would be needlessly restrictive. But now that I've been learning Simandl for a couple of years, the three-finger technique feels very natural and efficient.
     
  7. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Roger that...
     
  8. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    I just started (like, half an hour ago) on DB, and I'm using the Simandl. I also play fretless BG (lined, at the moment) and I've unconciously started using Simandl on it in the last few weeks to intonate correctly, so...why not?
     
  9. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    I've been working on some cool poop, wherein I use four finger -- but Thumb - 1 - 2 - 3 -- starting as low as C on the G string. I'm still working on a way to apprach this so that I can tell people how to do it, but it's really amazing how it opens up the neck. (For TB veterans, this is in addition the my Monster Fingering threads of the past)
     
  10. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?t=38912&highlight=monster+fingering

    that? If that's not it, please point me to it, it's all very interesting:)
     
  11. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Ooh, me too. I agree that getting in and out is the hardest part (here Sam's "inadvertent microtonalist" moniker comes to mind...), but once you get "in", there are a lot of possibilities. I recently got scoffed at by a bassist in the audience (who related it to my teacher, who was also present, although the scoffer didn't know I was studying with him) of a recent gig for doing that. The scoffer ended up saying it sounded great, but that "only a self-taught player would come up with **** like that", and that it would "hurt me in the long run".

    Whatever. :D I like it.
     
  12. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
  13. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    They all laughed at Christopher Columbus, right?

    Anyhow, the getting in and out isn't really awkward, but it is new for me. Getting out seems easier than getting in at this point.

    I've found it much easier to get in up closer to the break as my hand is on its way to TP anyhow (a la The Monster Thread). It's kind of at the point now that if I think about it, I blow it, but when I just 'want' it, it seems to come out ok. In the next few months as it comes together I may start yakking on about this stuff...
     
  14. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Man, my King should be here this weekend, I can't wait to try this stuff. Probably way over my head, but I appreciate the threads Ray:) I will be studying them, along with the simandl and rufus ried, and all the toher books I've got laying around...waiting for my bass....

    Also, the early link in the thread I pointed to
    http://sun.he.net/~rparker/TheExorcises/
    comes up as invalid, is that the same stuff that's in the second thread that you pointed to Ray?

    If that's clear...;>)
     
  15. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Good hunting!

    That link probably is bad, but it's the same poo.