To Music Man, Or not to Music Man.

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by OrioN_2k, Dec 14, 2001.

  1. FireAarro

    FireAarro

    Aug 8, 2004
    austr-
    What? Sterlings have contours. Maybe you're talking about SUBs?

    [​IMG]
    Sterling

    [​IMG]
    SUB

    [​IMG]
    Pre-EB 'Ray (thanks bovine ;))
     
  2. bovinehost

    bovinehost

    Dec 5, 2002
    Endorsing Artist: Ernie Ball Music Man/Sterling By Music Man
    I really don't understand "That's what I was told by the owner" - I thought you made a comparison, not asked someone else.

    While this isn't information that will exactly change the world as we know it, it is a basic misunderstanding. Stingrays are Stingrays. The differences between pre-EB and modern-era Stingrays are relatively small. Certainly there hasn't been much of a design change.

    Lighter in the 70s? Hardly. I've had a few pre-EBs that were quite heavy. You're much more likely to get a lighter one now, although you can also find modern Stingrays on the heavy side.

    The necks are not considerably different, although now a oil and wax finish is used in lieu of the old thick poly coating on the pre-EB instruments.

    No contours would not make a pre-EB Stingray like a Sterling in that a Sterling, of course, has contours.

    The Sterling was introduced in the 90s as sort of a "Jazz" alternative to the "Precision" Stingray - thus the downsized body and the thinner neck. Plus a pickup selector switch was added. You wouldn't easily mistake a Sterling for a Stingray, I would think.

    Well, you can say it, of course, but saying it doesn't make it correct; in fact, it is exactly wrong to say it. It's not a "to each his own" thing; it's not knowing the facts.

    Hope that helps.
     
  3. dlloyd

    dlloyd zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Apr 21, 2004
    Scotland
    Put down that pipe now!

    '70s Stingray
    Ser1%2Ejpg.jpg

    '70s Stingray
    Ser2%2Ejpg.jpg

    Current Stingray
    [​IMG]

    Current Sterling
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Musicman basses are great (in my opinion). I find them expensive, but they're worht every penny :D
     
  5. hands5

    hands5

    Jan 15, 2003
    good 'ol USA/Tampa fla.
    none
    IMO a good Jazz bass is WAY better than a (EB) Sterling or Stingray 4 or 5 in just about any situation,however I must admit that the Stingray does some things that alot of other basses (even the real good ones) just don't do.
    I will agree with you that the 4 string ray is good for Slapping,however I don't think the 5 is the so-call Funk machine to me it is more of a bass that is good for rock&metal. :meh:
     
  6. hands5

    hands5

    Jan 15, 2003
    good 'ol USA/Tampa fla.
    none
    Agreed.You can get a mellow sound out of the Stingrays because I've also done it even with regular roundwound strings in the studio,but the bass still lack the real fat,clean,and punchy low-mids that a Jazz bass has so thats why I kinda fell outta favor with it ,not that it was really my favorite bass anyway it was all that I had at the time.
     
  7. I really like the new Radiance Red finish, with black headstock.
     
  8. Dr. PhunkyPants

    Dr. PhunkyPants Guest

    Aug 11, 2002
    USA
    The red/black combo is a limited edition, with a special neckplate, etc. If you like it, you should get one now while they are still available.
     
  9. cgworkman

    cgworkman

    May 14, 2004
    Ohio
    What he said...

    Thanks Jack!
     
  10. lucas vigor

    lucas vigor Inactive

    Sep 2, 2004
    Orange County, Ca,
    Well, some people think that if you can't get a mellow sound on a EB, then it's because your fingers are untalented!

    I play mostly hawaiian, bluegrass, country and soul and I have been playing for about 25 years now...started out with my favorites being ACDC (Bass player used a stingray) went through the YES/KING CRIMSON/RUSH years, then new wave, then discovered Jaco, and jazz fusion...and now have went back to the organic, smooth and mellow sound...

    I think my technique is just fine, considering I play upright bass as well. I used finger style, pick, slap, double thump...you name it.

    My point is this: Few active basses are able to mellow out completely...as I have said in posts before, there is a huge difference between a passive tone control, and a active treble cut/boost...

    A huge difference! They are nowhere near the same thing!

    Plus, look at the size of that fat humbucker! It is simply not designed for a mellow sound..it is designed for an aggressive, growly in your face sound!

    There was an Ibanez bass that came out a while ago, that featured two fat humbuckers..and wasn't that guy Fieldy playin and endorsing it?

    The day I see Rocco Prestia or Donald Duck Dunn playing musicman and getting that mellow organic fender sound out of it, I will eat my words!

    Until then, all your technique will do on a musicman is either get a softer or louder sound..no way can you get the same kind of mellow sound my p-bass with flats gets. You can come close with a sterling, but not perfect.
     
  11. pickles

    pickles Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    I've been spending some on a friend's early model Ray-5 since my Modulus' electronics have been acting up.

    My conclusion: a stingray sounds like no other bass, and if what you like is a 'ray, then nothing else will do! But if you are used to Fenders (or say, Modulus) its quite an adjustment.

    The main thing that is hard for me is finding where to rest my plucking thumb, and its got a bit of a higher action than I'm used to, so I tend to just feel a little uncomfortable on it (being so used to my buttery Modulus) ... but it sounds huge.

    I think with a thumbrest in P-pickup-land (my fingers always want to be about 1" ahead of the pickup), a little neck tilt, and a fret job and the thing would be downright dangerous.
     
  12. Psychicpet

    Psychicpet Guest

    Mar 13, 2004
    Friend and Endorsee of Larry
    Rocco...mellow...???
    Anywho, a Jazz is not a StingRay. You'll never get a "J-Bass" tone out of a StingRay and vice versa BUT as to getting a "Mellow" tone which I believe people are meaning to say "P-Bass" tone then ofcourse a SR or Sterling isn't gonna give you that "P-Bass" tone but IT WILL give you Reggae and Bluegrass "mellow" . The Musicman bass that'll give you a killer P-Bass tone is the neck humbucker of a 2 humbucker Bongo bass soloed, they've got the P-Bass tone nailed AND you can get a great Jaco/Burpy bridge J-Bass sound out of the bass too. If Fender's what you like then great, buy a Fender but IMO why waste the money, just buy a Warmoth and you'll save money and have all the same parts (EXACTLY THE SAME NECK as Warmoth makes them for Fender US models) but then again all the MM stuff is made in the same MM factory in San Luis Obispo(even the cheaper priced SUB series).... well "to each his own" :eyebrow:
     
  13. lucas vigor

    lucas vigor Inactive

    Sep 2, 2004
    Orange County, Ca,
    it could be that I got the one sterling in existence that sucks...

    After having this bass almost 6 years, I deduced that the treble EQ was voiced way too high, and way too "glassy"

    As hard as I tried, I could not get a "dub" sound at all. The treble was always there, in my face.

    I could hear every scrape of my callus across the strings, in full detail, and that was with the treble rolled completly off.

    I can't imagine anyone using a musicman for bluegrass or reggae, at least not as the first choice, but..as one dude said "to each their own!"
     
  14. hands5

    hands5

    Jan 15, 2003
    good 'ol USA/Tampa fla.
    none
    I don't know about that.I mean they're allright,but they ain't" that good.
     
  15. Dr. PhunkyPants

    Dr. PhunkyPants Guest

    Aug 11, 2002
    USA
    I found this odd. My main instruments are two Sterlings--one with a rosewood board and one with a maple board. I do find that the tone varies some between instruments based on the woods used. However, I've never heard of anything like this.

    Could have been the strings or the amp. IMHO, choice of strings has a lot more to do with the amount of string noise heard than does the pickup design.
     
  16. Deaj

    Deaj

    Aug 15, 2004
    Kingston, WA
    My Bongo 4 HH is the most versatile bass I've ever played and quickly becoming my 'desert island' bass.
    :bassist:
     
  17. I know, I think I will soon. It's just that they're so darn expensive here in Sweden.

    I'd like to go to USA to lay my hands on one, or perhaps the Radiance Red Sterling.
     
  18. lucas vigor

    lucas vigor Inactive

    Sep 2, 2004
    Orange County, Ca,
    I was still getting too much of a high -end even with the flats!! I tried every different string there was, messed around with the EQ...nothing helped!

    I swear I am not making this up! The more I think about it, the more I think that I must have just had a stinker of a sterling. I tried to sell it to several bass playing friends, even letting some of them keep it for a few days, to evaluate. Not one person liked it!

    So, either I had a lemon, or, I just don't like active EQ vs. Passive tone!

    All I know is that around the same time, I bought another one -tricker, the venerable P-bass..and BAM! Problem solved! Rocco city! EXACTLY the soft, round tone I was seeking! (Keep in mind a put flats on it right away)

    Another thing I hated about the sterling: When playing with a very loud rock band, I could barely hear the d and g strings, compared to everything else! They sounded very "scooped" and turning up the mid control just made it sound too nasally!

    MY carvin has a similar situation..I like the sound, but backing off the treble completly does not completly eradicate the treble...

    I have mentioned this several times in posts, and not one person has ever agreed with me....rolling off the tone on a passive bass COMPLETLEY rolls of ALL treble frequencies..ALL frequencies!! The tone goes from dead, dull and muted (Which I happen to like) to "open" or "bright", meaning, I can hear string noise. On every active I have ever tried, rolling off the treble simply LESSENS the treble, but does not completely eradicate it..on my sterling, I could go from "bright" to "extremely bright and glassy" there was no dead, organic closed treble rolled-off tone! Even with the treble turned all the way down, i could still get a decent slap tone! Why is that?? On my p-bass (or my jazz, for example) slap tone is impossible to get, as long as that tone is rolled off!

    I wish one luthier would back me up on this and let me know I am not totally crazy!!
     
  19. My name IS Luther and you're totally crazy :eyebrow:
     
  20. BlasphemyArise

    BlasphemyArise

    Jul 15, 2004
    I played a couple MM's yesterday. I liked them, they played good and sounded decent but the press hardly seemed worth it for a new one. If I were to get one I'd look for one used first.