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Too much EQ. What to do?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by rickreyn, Dec 23, 2000.


  1. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    I note that many players have access to an abundance of EQ settings from their guitars to effects boxes to the main board. How do you coordinate it all? I've tried to simplify everything, but I am still not satisfied. I like the active Corvette Standard I am now playing, but it offers no mid-range controls. I solved that problem with a Yamaha parametric EQ effects box, but I still struggle with how to set up everything. Do I keep my amp flat? I use a Zoom for tuning, practice and an occasional effect.
     
  2. i have an Eden WT-800, and i use that for all of my tone shaping and what-not. I have my MIM Jazz bass, into a Sans Amp (i use it for the ocasional distortion) and on the sans amp, i have the eq set, so it makes the distortion sound better, but doesnt heavily change the tone. What i mainly like to do if i add effects to my chain, is have them set relativly flat, and only controll with my amp. it just makes everything easyer for me.
     
  3. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    My advice: start over with everything flat.

    The first question, though, is: what IS flat? If your amp has passive tone controls (cut only), flat is 10 on all tone knobs. If the controls are active (boost and cut), then flat is straight up, usually marked as 0 (zero). Same with your bass. If your bass is passive (no battery), then flat is wide open.

    (I should state here that if you don't like this sound, you may not be too successful with any further adjustments. If your rig, bass included, doesn't have a decent, pleasing -- to you -- sound when it's set all flat, then you may have the wrong rig for you.)

    NOW: Play with your band, or whatever you usually play with. Start by CUTTING frequencies you DON'T like, as opposed to boosting things you think you want more of. In my experience, when you get too many "adds" in the signal chain, things start to sound over-processed and you get a stiff, construct, artificial sound rather than a clear, open, natural sound.

    Once you get as close as you can, then you start adding colors. I boost 800 Hz with a touch of overdrive to get my fretless "mwah". But almost everything else is set to CUT rather than boost.

    Good luck!

     
  4. rickreyn

    rickreyn

    Jun 16, 2000
    Lutz, Florida
    I am getting to where most everything is flat with some go to sounds. I find that I lose the richness of the raw bass sound with too much of anything. Thanks for the advice.
     
  5. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    Cool. Let us know how it turns out, K?
     
  6. The above points are all valid, also remember to stand out in front of your amp with a long cord or wireless, 'cos the sound you hear on stage can be quite different to that heard by the audience.