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Too much power for cabs?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by funkedupbass, Jun 21, 2005.


  1. I have 2 single 10" speaker eden cabs that are rated for 150 watts rms each @ 8 ohms. I was thinking about getting either the crown ce-1000 or ce-2000 mainly becuse I've heard good things about them and I can get a deal on them. But I'm wondering if the ce-2000 would be too powerful for the 2 single 10" cabs. I like the ce-2000 because it could also drive my eden 4x10 "just in case"; its 700 rms @ 8 ohms. But would the ce-2000 be too powerful for the 2 single 10's? The ce-1000 ratings are 275 watts a channel @ 8 ohms and 900 watts @ 8 ohms bridged. The ce-2000 is 400 watts a channel @ 8 ohms and 1320 watts @ 8 ohms bridged. I understand headroom is good, but is the 400 watts a channel from the ce-2000 too much for the 2 150 watt single eden 10's? Would a compressor help?
    thanks,
    -eric
    funkeudpbass@hotmail.com
     
  2. Happy MurphDay

    Happy MurphDay

    Mar 9, 2004
    around
    there is a volume knob on the amp, you can keep it down, and if you are going to use the eden 4x10, you can always turn it up
     
  3. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    It depends on how you use the amp. Power rating are for *max* power under specified conditions. Just because you have an amp capable of 500 W, that doesn't mean it actually is putting out 500 W all or even most of the time.

    If you have to push either amp too hard, there's a good chance you'll hurt your speakers. If you only need to use a fraction of the power and scarcely push the amp, you'll probably be OK.

    This stuff has to be thought of in terms of your playing situation. It's impossible to say that, for example, a 500 W amp will *always* fry a 300 W speaker, or that it will *never* fry the speaker.

    A compressor may help, and often does, but it some situations it could actually make things worse. Speakers tend to be kinda forgiving of quick peaks that exceed their rating, but they deal much less well with sustained average levels of power above what they're rated for. The reason a compressor can give you more apparent loudness in some settings is that it increases the average power output (by decreasing the difference between loud and soft signals and effectively raising the quieter signals closer to the levels of the louder ones). If this increased average power is within a range that your speaker can still handle, you're cool. But if that increased average rises into a range that the cab can't handle, you run more of a risk of damage than you would with an uncompressed signal, because you're now presenting the speaker with higher power on a more consistent basis, rather than just in the form of an occasional transient peak.
     
  4. endlessbassic

    endlessbassic

    Dec 23, 2004
    A compressor may help, and often does, but it some situations it could actually make things worse. Speakers tend to be kinda forgiving of quick peaks that exceed their rating, but they deal much less well with sustained average levels of power above what they're rated for. The reason a compressor can give you more apparent loudness in some settings is that it increases the average power output (by decreasing the difference between loud and soft signals and effectively raising the quieter signals closer to the levels of the louder ones). If this increased average power is within a range that your speaker can still handle, you're cool. But if that increased average rises into a range that the cab can't handle, you run more of a risk of damage than you would with an uncompressed signal, because you're now presenting the speaker with higher power on a more consistent basis, rather than just in the form of an occasional transient peak.[/QUOTE]

    This is the most well-articulated (and least insulting) advice on this subject i think i've ever read.. anyone (especially those with a natural fear of phrases like "heat dissipation" and "excursion rating") using/purchasing amplification should print this and keep it in their pocket. Hats off..
     
  5. 44me

    44me

    Jun 17, 2002
    Bedford, NH USA
    It’s going to depend on your playing style and expectations. There’s nothing wrong with having clean headroom several times the cab’s RMS rating. If you like to boost the lows you probably are a little more likely to bottom out the drivers and damage them. As long as you are aware of that, and you are using the power go get a good clean sound at moderate volume, you should be OK.

    - John