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Torn - 15" Epifani Surround

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by ElephantTalk, Jan 21, 2006.


  1. ElephantTalk

    ElephantTalk

    Jan 20, 2005
    Indy
    I've got an Epifani 15" driver with a couple of tears in the surround. These tears are perpendicular to the edge of the speaker. One is actually torn from the frame to the cone the other is only partly torn.
    EDIT: It's an NYC

    Can I home remedy this?
    or
    Would I have to ask someone for a re-cone, re-surround?

    -El T
     
  2. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    What material is the surround, cloth or foam/rubber?
     
  3. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    You can fix it with rubber cement and cheesecloth, put the cement over the crack, cover it with a cheesecloth patch, press the patch into the folds of the surround so the cement seeps through the cloth. A better material is silkscreen, if you have a craft supply store in town.
     
  4. ElephantTalk

    ElephantTalk

    Jan 20, 2005
    Indy
    Thanks,Bill.
    I'll give it a try. So should this be done on the outside or the inside of the surround. It'll be a lot easier on the outside.
     
  5. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    Ideally both, but reaching the inside can be more bother than its worth.
     
  6. amper

    amper

    Dec 4, 2002
    US
    I have successfully patched angular tears in the surround with black cloth and clear silicone sealant. I have also successfully patched radial tears in the cone with fiberglass reinforced packaging tape (the extremely heavy duty 3M stuff with fiberglass woven cloth embedded). The repairs, if done well, can last a very long time (haven't had one fail), and probably won't affect the sound enough to be discernable.

    Of course, a properly done reconing job is a better solution, but sometimes you just don't want to/can't spend the money or afford the downtime.
     
  7. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    The fumes from silicone can dissolve some of the adhesives used in drivers, so it's better to stay with a rubber cement.
     
  8. Mongo Slade

    Mongo Slade Supporting Member

    Dec 1, 2005
    Northern New Jersey
    Nick Epifani provides some of the best customer service I have ever encountered, and would have the best solution for you. It might be best to just replace the speaker. I brought him my 2 T112s in and he showed me that even without tearing, the creases were shot from use and underpowering. He replaced both speakers while I waited at a suprisingly low cost, and now my boxes sound better thant they did new.
    I'm not gushing, just reporting.
    Peace
     
  9. amper

    amper

    Dec 4, 2002
    US
    That's good to know, Bill. The drivers I repaired have all been Celestion-made, with no evidence of any damage from the silicone. I thought silicone would be a good choice to repair the surround because of its long-term flexibility, but I never considered rubber cement. The next time I have to attempt to repair a surround, I'll try that.
     
  10. billfitzmaurice

    billfitzmaurice Commercial User

    Sep 15, 2004
    New Hampshire
    Owner, Bill Fitzmaurice Loudspeaker Design
    I haven't had problems with it, but I do know that silicone continues to gas off for a very long time, whereas the solvents in rubber cement dissipate rapidly. I do use silicone but only as a sealant on the outside of the cabinet, not the interior.
     
  11. ElephantTalk

    ElephantTalk

    Jan 20, 2005
    Indy
    Well, I've given it a try.
    I did wind up going with a piece of silk screen on the outside and the inside. I'll test it out tomorrow once it's dry.

    I might just go ahead and buy a replacement speaker just to have on the side.

    -El T
     
  12. ElephantTalk

    ElephantTalk

    Jan 20, 2005
    Indy
    Well all, the patch seems to have worked.
    Bill you're the man!

    I might just go ahead and pick another speaker for later use. Who know how long those patches are going to work?

    -El T
     
  13. ElephantTalk

    ElephantTalk

    Jan 20, 2005
    Indy
    I figured that I would post a follow-up on this problem that I ran into.
    Following the advice on a way to fix the tears in the CLOTH speaker surround on my Epifani T115.

    Materials needed:
    - silkscreen (prefered) or cheesecloth
    - rubber cement
    - scissors
    - toothpick or similar thin sturdy device for tucking material into folds of surround

    I pulled my speaker.
    I then cut pieces of silkscreen(ss) to fit the tears with overlap. Two per tear, so you can attempt front and back sides. I pulled some threads off (frayed) the edges of the ss pieces so that there were hairs sticking out all around the edge. (this helps when glueing the edges down)

    -Wipe off the speaker surround or air-dust it all the way around, front and back. Work on the front side first, then transition to the back once the front has had some time to dry.
    -Apply a scant layer of rubber cement in the area of the tear. This requires scraping the applicator brush on the edge of the can leaving only a little on the brush. Remember, you don't want to glob it on there.
    Try pushing the bristles of the brush into the tear to adhere the edges together.
    -Grab one of your ss pieces, set it on your finger tip and brush it with some cement.
    -Place the patch over the tear.
    At this time I found it easier to start with tucking the patch into the center surround fold (valley). I used the toothpick for this pressing with the shaft of the toothpick, not the tip, and kept blowing on the area as I was gently pressing it down. LEAVE NO AIR BUBBLES under the patch. They will be easy to see.
    -Once you've got that into place, press the patch onto the rest of the surround starting from the valley on inward toward the cone, then outward toward the frame. This will take some patience, because the patch may want to spring up at the edges. NOTE: there may be cement drying to the toothpick. The patch will want to come off with the toothpick, just wipe the cement off with your fingers. It's like rolling up boogers!

    -When you've got the patch into place, add some extra cement with the brush. The brush will also help you iron-out any bubbles under the patch.
    Let it set up for a few minutes, then you can attempt the back if the speaker has enough room behind. A 10" may not leave you much room to manuever.

    Repeat the process from above...
    Remember when intially placing the patch you want to make contact with as much surface area as possible to allow you to press the rest of the patch into place.

    Give the speaker a day to dry. Break it back in slowly.
    Good luck to anyone who may want to try.

    I'll post back up when / if the patch comes undone.

    -El T