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Total wattage and continuous wattage

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by MikeyMicrowave, Aug 28, 2012.


  1. MikeyMicrowave

    MikeyMicrowave

    Aug 26, 2012
    Hey guys,

    Thinking about getting a 2x10 cab to use for gigs as my band only really plays smaller sized venues (250 capacity or less.)

    My question is, the cab is rated at 350 RMS total but has a continuous wattage of only 175. I would be pairing it with an Ampeg SVT CL which is 300 RMS.

    Would this combination work? or would I be distorting the signal after I pushed it to anything above 175 watts?

    I'm kind of confused by this, sorry if it's a silly question but any help would be appreciated

    Thanks!
     
  2. As long as you are careful with your volume, you can play just about any head with any cab.

    Which 210 are you thinking of using? Your SVT really prefers to be paired with a 4 or 2 Ohm load.
     
  3. alexclaber

    alexclaber Commercial User

    Jun 19, 2001
    Brighton, UK
    Director - Barefaced Ltd
    If you're after a clean sound and will be turning down if you hear the amp overdriving or the cab complaining (farting/growling etc) then you'll be ok. But if you're going for anything even moderably dirty or the cab is low sensitivity and you're trying to hang in a rock band, then a toasted voicecoil or two is likely.
     
  4. MikeyMicrowave

    MikeyMicrowave

    Aug 26, 2012
    http://www.gak.co.uk/en/peavey210-tvx-bass-cab/21368

    I was thinking about using this Peavey cab as i've seen it get pretty good reviews and it matches the 4ohm the SVT requires. I'm really looking for something smaller in size (height and depth) but still wide enough for the SVT to sit comfortably on top of.

    I play in a Ramonesy kind of punk band and tend to aim for a trebely punchy tone (Geddy-ish) as opposed to a deep bass tone but am still unsure if this will work the way i'd like it too. It's frustrating trying to find a relatively small amp, in my price range, that runs at 4 ohms!
     
  5. alexclaber

    alexclaber Commercial User

    Jun 19, 2001
    Brighton, UK
    Director - Barefaced Ltd
    That would worry me!
     
  6. MikeyMicrowave

    MikeyMicrowave

    Aug 26, 2012
    That's why i'm asking! It's good to get opinions from people who know more about this kind of stuff than I do, haha.
     
  7. OP, the continuous power rating is RMS (root mean square).
    This is the amount of power the voice coil can absorb from a sine wave before it melts into goo.
    175 watts is approximately 37 volts into an 8 ohm nominal load.

    Music Power or Program Power are marketing terms intended to bolster ratings.
    350w "looks better" than 175w, but it is not entirely marketing B.S.

    With musical content, the power input is frequency dependent.
    The lower the note, the higher the input power.
    This is why you can run a 75 watt tweeter with a 250 watt woofer.
    Until... you decide to run a 250 watt sine wave... which then smokes the tweeter.

    Unlike music, the sine wave power level is not frequency dependent.
    If you spend all day playing sine waves, restrict yourself to 175 watts.
     
  8. Mushroo

    Mushroo Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    Massachusetts, USA
    Peavey cabs are a great deal, especially on the used market! The only thing to keep in mind if you are not familiar with Peavey products is that they are heavy. I use a Peavey 410TX for all my rock gigs and it sounds great. :)
     
  9. It really depends on how loud you plan on being. If you want a small cab, then you need to be aware of its capabilities and not expect any more out of it. In fact a lot of manufacturer's specs are thermal ratings and dont really give you a good picture of how much power a cab can handle before it farts out. Use your ears and some common sense and you will be fine.
     
  10. Mushroo

    Mushroo Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    Massachusetts, USA
    ps I throw 450w into my 4x10 and the power amp farts out before the speakers, based on that I'll estimate the 2x10 can handle at least 225w, all other things being equal. :)
     
  11. MikeyMicrowave

    MikeyMicrowave

    Aug 26, 2012
    True enough! Thanks for your help guys.

    Totally unrelated, but does anyone have any experience with Avatar bass cabs? The 2X10 is more expensive than the Peavey, but also has a much higher power rating depending on which speakers you go with. Maybe i'd be better off to give one of these a go?
     
  12. Any 210 you find is going to be with in a pretty tight range of volume/power handling regardless of specs. To go louder the speakers have to move in and out more (xMax). To do so other considerations have to be met. You may gain 20% or so more volume/power handling, but that isnt a huge jump when you are talking about a 210.

    Think of it this way: You are not going to find a 210 that out performs a 410. If the xMax increased that much, then some other tonal/frequency response/sensitivity consideration would have to be made.

    You want big sound, you need a big cab. A 210 may infact be enough for you. how loud is your band? Do you have PA support where you play?
     
  13. MikeyMicrowave

    MikeyMicrowave

    Aug 26, 2012
    We're a pretty loud band i'd say, even though for the past 5 years i've been playing out of a 100 watt solid state Yorkville amp. I've always managed to cut through and get pretty nice tone with just that, but just barely, and now i've decided it's time for an upgrade to something with a bit better tone and a bit more volume.

    We very rarely have any kind of PA support because we mostly play in dingy bars and basements, haha.
     
  14. Then I would be looking at a 410 minimum.

    What is your budget, and what is available to you used?
     
  15. Mushroo

    Mushroo Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    Massachusetts, USA
    What is the speaker configuration on your Yorkville? That is much more important than the wattage as CL400Peavey eloquently explained above.
     
  16. MikeyMicrowave

    MikeyMicrowave

    Aug 26, 2012
    I've been checking my local classifieds (kijiji) and there's nothing thats jumping out to me. I'd like to spend between 300 and 500 dollars. I just don't want something too bulky. I looked at a 1x15 Peavey black widow and I don't think it would even fit in my trunk or backseat (like a previous user said would happen)
     
  17. MikeyMicrowave

    MikeyMicrowave

    Aug 26, 2012
    That was a single 1X15 speaker (solid state combo) Yorkville XM100 to be exact
     
  18. Mushroo

    Mushroo Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    Massachusetts, USA
    Depending where you live, you can probably find two used 2x10's in your price range (heck you could probably buy 4 Peaveys!!). That would be a very versatile rig, you can bring 1 cab for rehearsals/coffeeshops and 2 for gigs.

    The "x factor" being the ohm restrictions on your tube amp, I honestly know nothing about that topic.
     
  19. Mushroo

    Mushroo Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    Massachusetts, USA
    A 2x10 is probably not going to give you a satisfying boost in volume compared with a 1x15 (all other things being equal, which they never are).

    On the other hand 2x10 PLUS 1x15 is a fairly popular small/medium rig.
     
  20. Well if you are working with transportation constraints all bets are off. Find a 4 Ohm cab you can transport and afford and then be very careful with your volume. Finding something small, powerful, and cheap is going to be very hard.

    If it was my money I would contact SHO Bass and ask about a Bassic loaded with the 4 Ohm Faital Pro. Might have to save and stretch your budget, but it will be one of the few small cabs that has a decent power handling at 4 Ohms.
     

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