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Transcriptions of standards for audition

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Justin V, Apr 15, 2003.


  1. Justin V

    Justin V

    Dec 27, 2000
    Alameda, CA
    (if this is in the wrong forum, I'm sorry, go ahead and move it)

    I need some help here guys. I've got an audition at San Francisco St. on May 8th. On the description of the audition, it says that I need to play the bass lines for one of four standards. The two that I can remember being on the list are "All Blues" and "Equinox". There were two others, but I left the sheet with the description at home.

    Could someone please show me a transcription (standard notation) of one of the songs. I've tried looking on Google, but all I could come up with were sites that were selling transcription books. I don't really have time to order a book.

    Thanks.
    Justin V.
     
  2. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    If you don't have time to order a book, then I doubt you have time to learn how to create lines on the spot, either. Jazz is different from many other styles of music in that you have to bring your cooking skills to the kitchen and create your own meal rather than just sitting down and eating what someone else has already cooked for you.

    If you have a private teacher to help you with this, you might have a chance if you're willing to put some serious work into it.
     
  3. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    They want you to walk and blow on the changes,possibly play a head from memory,no chart!I've done that type of audition,believe me you'll be playing in front of Prof's who know the jazz medium,you can't fake it.Read above what Chris said.That's the deal.
     
  4. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Do a search for member Phil Smith. In his signature is a link to an online real book he created.

    If you're going to school to play music, you should buy a real book anyway. While you may not have time to order it, you're in Pleasanton, and I can guarantee you that you should be able to find one with no more than a 20 minute drive, tops.

    Also, "All Blues" has an ostinato figure that you might want to know. (Listen to the recording for it, it's fairly straight-forward). But, as everyone else has mentioned, you're going to need to improvise a line on the spot.
     
  5. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Nice analogy :) I'll remember that one...
     
  6. Phil Smith

    Phil Smith Mr Sumisu 2 U

    May 30, 2000
    Peoples Republic of Brooklyn
    Creator of: iGigBook for Android/iOS
    I suggest listening to the tunes, if you can get your hand on the "Real Book" the bass line for "Equinox" is there. The main bass line for "All Blues" is G D E D F, if you have the record you can figure out the rest, the rhythm and how it should sound. "Equinox" is easier C C C G Bb C C C, again get the record and you can figure out the rest.
     
  7. Justin V

    Justin V

    Dec 27, 2000
    Alameda, CA
    Thank you to everyone who's posted so far. I really appreciate the help. I guess I worded it wrong in my initial post, but the charts are more of what I was looking for. I'm bassically going to be spending the next three weeks practicing my butt off for the audition (thank God for spring break eh?). I know how to make up lines on the spot fairly well. My teacher tells me that I just have a bad habit of being too notey and losing the chord. That's probably what I'll be working the most on.

    Dumb question. Where would I find a copy of the "Real Book"? Would it be at a music shop or at a book store? I know that's a dumb question, but it would be really helpful.
     
  8. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    If I'm not mistaken, the original Real Book and its brethren are still technically illiegal, but you can still get them "under the table" at certain places. However, Sher music put out three books entitled "The New Real Book" vols. 1-3 which are perfectly legal and can be had at many places, including Lemur and www.jazzbooks.com . If you're into standards, you can't miss with Volume One. Good luck.
     
  9. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    The Sher Real Books also have the advantage of having been approved by the composers themselves (the ones still living that is) - and according to www.shermusic.com - "many of them are from the composer's own lead sheets".

    I think the original Real Book does contain mistakes.
     
  10. Justin V

    Justin V

    Dec 27, 2000
    Alameda, CA
    Thanks for the links guys. I'll probably order "The New Real Book" tonight with rush shipping. Also, Phil, that link in your sig is the coolest thing I've seen on the web in a while.
     
  11. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Anyone here who does have the Sher real book - could you do me a favour and post the chord changes it gives for Dolphin Dance? I wanna compare notes, as it were :)
     
  12. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    Originally posted by BUSTIN' LOOSE

    Dumb question. Where would I find a copy of the "Real Book"? Would it be at a music shop or at a book store? I know that's a dumb question, but it would be really helpful.

    Your local library might have a copy of one, if not, they can order it from another library for you. I ordered The Hal Leonard real jazz standards fake book : over 240 songs from mine and have to pick it up tomorrow.
     
  13. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    C'mon, I know someone's got it :D
     
  14. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I've got all three volumes. Which part of the changes are you curious about? (Dolphin Dance is a long tune....)
     
  15. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    It's not in Volume 1 but I have got two versions of it! So I have a lead sheet given to me by Franc O' Shea who leads his own Jazz quintet and plays this - he plays the melody on bass and also has some neat bass chordal parts.


    The thing I remember is strange number of bars in the sections of the form 38 in total...

    Here's the 2nd version I have which I think is straigher :

    Ebmaj7/Bbmin7/Ebmaj7/Dmin7b5 G7/Cmin7/Ab7/Cmin7/Amin7b5 D7/Gmaj7/Abmin7 Db7/Fmin7/Bb7/Cmin7/Cmin7|Bb/Amin7/D7/Gmaj7/G7sus/G7+11/G7sus/F7sus/F7+11/F7sus/Emin7 A7/Eb7+11/Amin7 D7/Bm7/E7 Dmin7/C#min7/F#7/Bmin7/Amin7|B/Bmin7/Amin7|B/Bbmin7/Ebmaj7+/Abmaj7/Dmin7 G7
     
  16. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    This is what I've got:

    | Ebmaj7 | Bb-7/Eb | Ebmaj7 | D-7b5 G7b9 ||: C-7 | Ab7#11 | C-7 | A-7 D7 |

    | Gmaj7 | Ab-7 Db7 | F-7 | Bb7 | C-7 | C-7 | A-7 | D7 |

    | Gmaj7 | Gsus | A/G | Gsus | Fsus | G/F | Fsus | E-7 A7 |

    | Eb7#5 | A-7 D7 | B-7 | E7 D-7 | C#-7 | F#7 | B-7 | A-7/B | B-7 | A-7/B |

    | Bb-7 | Bb7 | Bbsus | D-7b5 G7b9 :||

    Largely based on the old real book version - with a few changes based on what I thought Herbie was playing.

    How similar is this to the Sher version? I'm thinking that if (like it claims) - the new version is checked by the composer, and possibly even from his lead sheet (seeing as Herbie is still around) - it ought to be accurate.

    I'm not convinced the original real book one is accurate - for example, in bar 4, the original real book had D-7b5 G7. Listen to the head on the version from the Maiden Voyage album. That ain't no straight G7. I think he's voiced it with a #4, #9 and 13 in that instance.

    And yup, Bruce, 38 bars. The first 32 bars are even phrases of two bars - but then he repeats that B-7 A-7 vamp in bars 31-32, before the final 4-bar turnaround (or whatever you want to call it).
     
  17. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    Sher Music is based in the Bay Area. You'd think there's be some local stores that would carry the New Real Books.
     
  18. Richard Lindsey

    Richard Lindsey

    Mar 25, 2000
    Metro NYC
    That's a pretty common practice, not to note all the extensions on dom7 chords. First, because you might well play them differently on successive passes, and second because it can get tedious. I don't mean to say that there aren't often cases where you do have to play a specific chord to get the right sound, just that there's often a good amount of leeway regarding the extensions and alterations you choose to use.
     
  19. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Yes that's true. But you could say that G7 implies Mixolydian harmony, whereas G7b9 implies (half-step/wholestep) diminished scale harmony - which is more accurate.

    But, then again, you could say that's implied by the fact that the G7 is following D-7b5.

    Anyway, I think G7b9 is more helpful for that change.

    The thing is, when doing a lead sheet, how far are you gonna go with leaving out extensions? Take that Ab7#11 chord in bar 6 for example - the original real book simply had Ab7 for that chord. And I'd say the #11 is fairly important, given that the melody is on a D at that point. And specifying Lydian Dominant harmony at that point is far more helpful.
     
  20. ConU

    ConU

    Mar 5, 2003
    La Belle Province
    I think Richard's point,and I'm sure you're well aware of it,we never play the same thing twice(or try to anyway)I'm sure if Herbie is preparing a lead sheet for his band,his extensions are there.Common practice I've found is if someone else does it usually the basic chord is there unless the leader absolutely want's the original voicings, otherwise it's left up to the improviser to decide,given the melody for sure,how he want's to interpret the changes.That's the tradition anyways that I've been exposed too.