Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

transposition problem: major becomes minor

Discussion in 'Music Theory [DB]' started by pippin, Feb 24, 2006.


  1. pippin

    pippin

    Dec 29, 2005
    santa cruz,ca
    As a new bassist I find a lack of old standards' melody lines written in bass clef and in C where it is easier for me, at least, to start. I have gone on line and read about transpositioning and done some key changes and shifting the notes down to the bass clef. I have had some success but often my results come out sounding "minor". Can anyone give me any hints as to what I'm doing worng.

    Or, can anyone give me a website that automatically does these transpositing for me. Chordie does chords ( naturally) but I haven't found anything for straight melody lines. Or is it a copywrite issue?

    thanks
     
  2. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Your best bet is to learn treble clef. Not a hard thing to do.

    I've been meaning to learn tenor clef. I'll make a pact with you -- you learn treble and I'll learn tenor :)
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Welll...the 3rd of the chord is what gives it its minor 'colour' ..so maye you should pay particular attention to these ?? :p
     
  4. SteveS

    SteveS Guest

    "As a new bassist I find a lack of old standards' melody lines written in bass clef and in C where it is easier for me, at least, to start. I have gone on line and read about transpositioning and done some key changes and shifting the notes down to the bass clef. I have had some success but often my results come out sounding "minor". Can anyone give me any hints as to what I'm doing worng."

    Reading treble clef on the bass does not involve transposing (except in octaves), so you don't need to change any keys. Just learn to read treble clef, and as a practical manner, be prepared to shift octaves to make the stuff playable.
    Here is a tip which should help in conceptualizing reading all clefs. There is a grand staff. In general, in piano music, (not always) the grand staff has a bass clef staff, and a treble clef staff. Middle C lies between the two. Any clef just defines where on the Grand Staff the music presented lies, and therefore, where middle C lies. After you realize this, it's just a matter of playing in the clef to make it become easy. Bite the bullet, learn the clef without tricks. This should not be hard when playing melodies you already know, since your ear will tell you if you are correct.
     
  5. NickyBass

    NickyBass Supporting Member

    Nov 28, 2005
    Southern New Jersey
    I agree that reading treble clef, and tenor, is important in the development of a well rounded musician. However, I think that someone who is a beginning bass player may be doing themselves a disservice by trying to learn too much too fast. It is tough enough to get all the mechanics in working order, let alone three or more clefs. I would say this...Try to learn the meldoies by ear. This practise is more important than just learning the tune. It helps devolop many aspects of musicianship. Also, if you can play in C well, then it's time to move through the other keys. If you sound good when you're practising, then your practising the wrong thing. The other thing that I would reccomend is to get a Simandl or other bass method book to develop your reading and technique.
     
  6. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    I agree with the concept of not wasting time practicing what you already know, but THAT seems a bit extreme. So are we supposed to be practicing until it sounds "not quite sh*tty anymore" and then move onto something else?

    Hey, I'm practicing for my audition at UoT. So since I already sound pretty decent on St. Thomas and Body and Soul, should I just put those away and start whole new ones, moving onto soloing before I even know the changes or have the head in time and in tune? Or maybe I should start trying to warm up with advanced bow exercises on three octave F# and B scales, instead of those ones that I know I can tune properly.

    Back on topic...just learn treble clef. It's actually VERY useful. To be honest, even though I get my string bass parts in class every day, I'm still reading WAY more treble clef than bass clef lately. Take the plunge! :)
     
  7. NickyBass

    NickyBass Supporting Member

    Nov 28, 2005
    Southern New Jersey
    No, I didn't say practice until it sounds "not quite sh*tty anymore", so why the quotes? What I meant was that people sometimes practice something because it sounds good, you know...instant gratification. I also said that he shouldn't learn treble clef until he's comfortable with bass clef. Why would he learn bass clef until it sounds "not quite sh*tty anymore", and move onto treble clef.
     
  8. Aaron Saunders

    Aaron Saunders

    Apr 27, 2002
    Ontario
    True. I agree with your point, but I was just illustrating that saying that you shouldn't sound good while practicing is a pretty poor way of communicating that partciular idea idea.
     
  9. NickyBass

    NickyBass Supporting Member

    Nov 28, 2005
    Southern New Jersey
    Perhaps you're right in the wording. I didn't mean that literally. It's just something that I say to myself when I feel that I'm relying on the same licks or ideas.