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Triads

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Garrett Mireles, Oct 21, 2003.


  1. Cmaj triad:

    G-----0-
    D---2---
    A-3-----

    If I take the 3rd an octave lower,

    G------0---
    D----------
    A-3--------
    E---0------

    ..does it remain a Cmaj triad?

    Also, what do you name a triad with a sharp 3rd? And if it has a sharp 3rd and 5th? It looks like an inversion..only it's not.

    Thanks. :bassist:
     
  2. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    yep, still a triad. One of my favorite voicings for a triad is the third on the bottom with the root and then the fifth on the top. It gives it a more ambiguous texture.

    Thirds are never sharp, they are either flat (minor) or natural (major). A sharp 3rd would be a perfect 4th.

    Root 4th 5th is a sus chord.
     
  3. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    if the major 3rd is raised a semitone, so you have C, F (or E#, if you're so inclined) & G, you'd call it a suspended 4th triad

    the 'sharp 3rd & 5th' scenario would give you C, E# and G#, enharmonically: C, F & Ab... which you'd normally call an F minor triad (2nd inversion if the C is at the bottom)
     
  4. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    As the others have said, you don't. Didn't you ask about this #3 #5 thing once before? Or was that someone else? Anyway the other guys summed it up - when the 4th replaces the 3rd, it's a sus4 chord, but there isn't a #3 #5 chord - in this case, it's just F Minor in 2nd inversion.
     
  5. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    When you change the order around completely (i.e. 3rd - root - fifth), do you just call it by the name of the inversion that has the same interval as the bass note (first inversion in this case)?
     
  6. Cool...I've always wondered about that.

    btw what is the second inversion notated as?

    Cheers,

    Craigles

    EDIT: I'm assuming it's C/G ???
     
  7. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    That would be a slash chord, with the root first and the bass note second.

    For instance, as GUACAMOLEY said, a Cmaj in its first inversion would be C/E. If you were referring to the triad, you'd just call it "Cmaj triad in 1st inversion".

    Same thing applies to second inversions.
     
  8. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    The inversion goes by the bass note. 3rd in the bass = 1st inversion, 5th in the bass = 2nd inversion.
     
  9. moley

    moley

    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    You got it.
     
  10. Aaron

    Aaron

    Jun 2, 2001
    Bellingham, WA
    I was just asking if a triad voiced 3rd-root-fifth would have a different name as a triad voiced 3rd-fifth-root. I believe moley stated that they would both be C maj in first inversion or C/E.
     
  11. sunburstbasser

    sunburstbasser

    Oct 18, 2003
    Raising a Major Third in a triad will give a fourth or it can also be called an augmented third.