Trouble hearing walk to next chord

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by rydin4lifebass, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Odd question here..but I recently came across the song "The Stroll" by The Diamonds from 1957/58. It's a 12 bar blues progression in F using F, Bb, and C. For the first verse, I hear just the straight progression. On the second verse, I hear the first 3 bars of F and the fourth bar sounds like a walk to Bb but I can't make it out (around :48 mark). Also, at the beginning of the 3rd verse, the first bar sounds like another "walk style" but staying on F (1:09 mark).

    I uploaded the song here:
    THE STROLL

    NOW...the only bad thing about that is that plays in quicktime in the browser (for me anyway) and you can't see the time. I found a version on YouTube but it features a burlesque dancer sporting pasties. All the other versions I've found have a heavy sax in them so the bass isn't as clear. I know a lot of people here are pretty strict so I wasn't sure if I could post that link or not...if you go to youtube and search "diamonds the stroll", it's the second video to show titled "The Diamonds - The Stroll (re-recording) featuring Candy Barr"
     
  2. Ah yes, Candy Barr. Now that takes me back a few years. Seem to remember she went to prison for something. Dallas and Jack Ruby come to mind, but, it's fuzzy.

    Not sure what was done in the song. I'd use a chromatic three note walk to the next chord. Target the next root - miss it by 3 frets (same string) then walk to it one fret at a time and be on the root for the chord change. Timing when to leave so you can get the chromatic walk in and be on the next root for the chord change is the trick.

    Let the lyrics help with when to leave on your walk. Try three lyric words before the chord change see if that works out.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    It's a simple 1 b7 6 5 to the 1 of the 4 chord.

    Walking chromatically to a chord can work, but it's not very common in this type of music - diatonic is much less jarring on the ears.
     
  4. Malcolm - I was going to go the chromatic route and use F-G-G#-A and land on Bb for the 1 of the IV chord which sounds ok to me.

    Pacman - So you're saying F - Eb - D - C and Bb as beat 1 of the IV chord? This seems to be the same chromatic movement Malcolm mentioned but "backwards"...is that common in certain styles above others?

    Any thoughts on what I hear as the "walk/run" staying in F for the 3rd verse, or do my ears deceive me?
     
  5. Another quick questions:

    let's say I have a song in they key of D. If I walk from the I chord (D) to the V chord (A) and use the notes D-D-C#-B and land on A as beat 1, would the D-D-C#-B movement be referred to as 1-1-7-6-5 (since that's how they appear in the key of D)?

    Also, a walk from D to G in the key of D could use D-D-E-F# . Would I refer to that as a 1-1-2-3-4(G). That seems right but want to make sure I'm using the numbers correctly.
     
  6. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Far more common would be to play F-F-G-A and then land on the Bb for the 1 of the IV chord.

    Chromatic = movement by half steps.
    Diatonic = movement within the key
    Scalar = movement within a scale.

    Chromatic decending (not backwards) from the F would be F-E-Eb-D. So it's not the same at all.
     
  7. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification

    They deceive you. The bassist plays the Bb every time. He sometimes plays a line descending from the F as a pentatonic (F-D-C-A) to approach the Bb from a half step below.

    These approaches are all pretty similar in country and early rock and roll. Chromaticism (outside of the key) is not appreciated too much in these styles, if at all.
     
  8. I think I follow you.

    Chromatic - I could move from F to Bb by going F-C#-C-B and then Bb on the 1 beat.

    Diatonic - The 1-b7-6-5 you mentioned (F-Eb-D-C). Is this still considered diatonic since the Eb isn't in the key of F? Would the true diatonic be F-E-D-C ?

    Also, could you explain the difference between a diatonic and scalar movement?

    Thanks all for the help, as always...
     
  9. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Correct, *IF* the song is in F major. We talk about this song as if it's a pure F major, but it's actually an F blues. So all the chords are dominant (F7, Bb7 and C7).

    If this were a true major 1 chord, you'd diatonically walk F-E-D-C, but since it's a blues, the Eb is appropriate.

    Sort of like above. But maybe I've got a chord change outside a diatonic progression. In that case a scale relating to the chord at hand wouldn't be diatonic, but still scalar.
     
  10. Thanks for the explanation. Excuse my ignorance but if I understand correctly, there are multiple possibilities available to walk from the F to the Bb but you would you say that they're all "ok" to use but that there is definitely a "best" option (that being F-Eb-D-C) ?
     
  11. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    Maybe not a "best" option, but "better." And that being said, for old rock and roll and traditional country, that title would probably go to the walk up (F-F-G-A). literally thousands of tunes have that transition to the IV chord. But they're all shades of the same paint. Get to know, and be able to use, all of them. They're just more arrows in your quiver.
     
  12. Excellent...and was hoping that would be your answer. I definitely want to know my available options and what a "better" situation might be to use them. I assumed the transition was an F-F-G-A or something along those lines but I didn't hear that, hence why I asked the question. Again, thanks for the assistance and helping me add some "arrows"...
     
  13. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    You're more than welcome!
     
  14. Art Araya

    Art Araya

    May 29, 2006
    Palm Coast, FL
    "Best" in this case being defined as most appropriate for a given genre of music.

    I remember when I first learned the whole tone scale. And then I discovered that it could be played over a dominant seventh chord. Man I played it everywhere. I was in an old time rock and roll band and so when the solo bass section of Brown Eyed Girl came around, I used my newly learned whole tone scale. Well it "worked" in a theoretical way but it didn't fit the song and the genre at all.