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True ghost notes?

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by CrawlingEye, Mar 10, 2002.


  1. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    I've noticed that when you play ghost notes, it sounds differently depending on where on the neck you play it.

    Isn't the definition of a ghost note to be for rhythm, but playing a note with no real definition, or fitting into any keys (or fitting into all?)

    I've been thinking about that, and wondering about that at the same time.

    Is it just a difference in sustain that I'm hearing, because when you play it lower it allows more sustain?
     
  2. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    I guess it's just a different mixture of overtones.
     
  3. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    That's what I was thinking... wouldn't that then make it delicate to where played, though?
     
  4. Mr_Pink

    Mr_Pink

    Nov 30, 2000
    Belgium
    I don't think so. I often play ghostnotes and never have problems.

    I compare it with the drums.
     
  5. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    I'm aware of what ghost notes are used as, and that they're supposed to work for anything.

    My point is, if you ghost a note higher on the neck, it sounds different than lower on the neck.

    My question is, is this a difference in sustain that I'm hearing, or is this a difference in the actual note?

    I mean, it sounds as if it could be the note, and it doesn't seem unlikely.
     
  6. hujo

    hujo

    Apr 18, 2001
    Stockholm, Sweden
    I would think of it more as a different timbre. If you play a G on the A-string vs the E-string, it's another sound, the same goes for ghostnotes. There's not that much too it really. Like JMX said, different overtones.
     
  7. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    You can utilize those different sounds to a degree, like a more extreme form of muted notes, so-to-speak.
    I usually play deadnotes, e.g. in a staccato funk line, on a fret where I would play an actual note of that line. The overtone signature of that note will also partly be in the deadnote, which will make it blend in a bit more with the rest of the bass line.
    But you can also play a "higher" deadnote, e.g. to give a hihat-like twist or to make it stand out more.
     
  8. hujo

    hujo

    Apr 18, 2001
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Marcus Miller is a great listening tip for very innovative use of ghostnotes.
     
  9. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    Ok, thanks. :)

    I think that pretty much answers everything.
    I'm pretty much hearing a difference in sustain and overtones, and it's in fact not a different note...

    I think this is probably better than what I was thinking, considering it offers more possibilities. :)