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Truss rods

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by cdaniel, Dec 7, 2003.


  1. cdaniel

    cdaniel

    Nov 29, 2003
    Arizona
    I've got a bass with a truss rod that can't get loose enough to get the neck relief I need. What's guy to do?:confused:
     
  2. wombolombo

    wombolombo

    Nov 29, 2003
    Raleigh, NC
    How much relief are you looking for?

    Are you using something to measure the amount of relief?

    What symptoms or noises are you trying to get rid of?

    Did you loosen the strings all the way before turning the truss rod?

    I've found that on a lot of basses you need to let the bass sit for several hours before analyzing the adjustment.
     
  3. cdaniel

    cdaniel

    Nov 29, 2003
    Arizona
    I'm looking for just a little more relief than what I have now. This is new guitar that needs a setup. It was totally unplayable in the store and I had them do what they could before I bought it. It's pretty close but I'm still getting a little buzz on the G string. This is with the action set around 3/32 at the 17th fret. When I adjusted it the neck was real flat with no percievable bow. I can adjust the buzz out with the bridge but the action ends up higher than I like.

    I'll give it some time to settle and check it out again
     
  4. wombolombo

    wombolombo

    Nov 29, 2003
    Raleigh, NC
    You should measure the relief (different from the action).

    You measure the relief by fretting the E (or B) string at the 1st and last fret (I use a capo at the 1st fret so that I can do it by myself).

    After that, there's a million different ways to measure it - I use feeler guages. Generally speaking, the amount of relief should be somewhere between .012" and .020".

    I know that Carvin has PDFs of a set-up guide on their web site...

    http://www.carvin.com/manuals/Bass_Care.pdf

    They obviously geared it towards Carvin set-ups, but it doesn't really matter.
     
  5. cdaniel

    cdaniel

    Nov 29, 2003
    Arizona
    I use the same method, capo and a feeler gauge. Recommended by the Fender Mr. Gearhead site. The relief is around .010 right now. Feeler gauges are difficult to get a real accurate reading though. The angle of the gauge to the fret is tough to repeat. But at any rate I'm wanting a little more relief but it's at the end of loose adjustment. I'm going re check after it sits for a while and see what I get.

    :)
     
  6. wombolombo

    wombolombo

    Nov 29, 2003
    Raleigh, NC
    Do you want the relief to be higher than .010, or lower?

    If you can't get more relief than .010, I'd guess that something is wrong somewhere...most folks have trouble getting it down to .010 without getting lots of noises.

    You may want to take it to someone to have a look-see at it...
     
  7. cdaniel

    cdaniel

    Nov 29, 2003
    Arizona
    That's exactly the problem, while I'm not sure what the actual number is, .010 .015 maybe. The current relief with a completely loose truss rod is not quite enough.
     
  8. Chasarms

    Chasarms Casual Observer

    May 24, 2001
    Bettendorf, IA USA
    The only easy fix I can think of is to step up to a little heavier string. The neck may give a little more under the extra tension.

    You might also try tuning the existing strings up a step or two and letting the bass sit. The extra tension may bow the neck a bit. You may want/need to replace the strings after that, but the neck will likely bend a little easier the next time after having been bent once. Sort of like a recurve bow draws a little easier over time.